Frequently Asked Questions: Regulations

The FAQs below are meant to provide Canadians and businesses with basic information about Natural Resources Canada’s most accessed regulations, which were identified by the number of outbound clicks to regulations from the Justice Canada website.

Explosives Regulations, 2013

  1. What is the purpose of this regulation?

    The Explosives Safety and Security Branch (ESSB) of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is responsible for administering the Explosives Act and Regulations and pursuing the advancement of explosives safety and security technology. The Regulations seek to improve the safety and security of the public and all workers involved in the Canadian explosives industry.  This is done through measures taken to:

    • ensure that explosives are safe to make, transport, store and use;
    • prevent explosives from being used in illegal activities;
    • assess explosives blast hazards, recommend mitigation measures; and,
    • provide an environment that ensures a reliable supply of modern, safe and cost-effective explosives for Canadian industry.
  2. What are the key elements of this regulation?

    The Regulations are sub-divided into 20 Parts with the information organized for ease of reference:

    Part Title
      General Information
    1 Introduction
    2 General Requirements, Prohibitions and Safety Precautions
    3 Authorization and Classification of Explosives
    4 Importing and Exporting Explosives and Transporting Explosives in Transit
    5 Manufacturing Explosives
    6 Magazine Licences and Storage in a Licensed Magazine
    7 Provisions of General Application
    8 Screening
    9 Transporting Explosives
    10 Military Explosives and Law Enforcement Explosives
    11 Industrial Explosives
    12 Power Device Cartridges
    13 Special Purpose Explosives
    14 Small Arms Cartridges, Propellant Powder and Percussion Caps
    15 Model and High-Power Rocket Motors
    16 Consumer Fireworks
    17 Special Effect Pyrotechnics
    18 Display Fireworks
    19 Fees
    20 Restricted Components
     
  3. How does this regulation affect Canadian businesses?

    The Explosives Regulations, 2013 provide the regulatory framework for members of the explosives industry, including manufacturers, transporters, importers, sellers and users of explosives, fireworks, pyrotechnics and restricted components.  Principle activities include:

    • authorization and classification of all commercial explosives used in Canada;
    • issuance of licences and permits for import/export/in-transit, manufacture, storage and sale of explosives;
    • inspection of factories and magazines;
    • use of fireworks;
    • compliance; and,
    • standards and guideline development.
  4. What is the timeline for implementation?

    On February 1, 2014, the amended Explosives Regulations, 2013 came into force with a phased implementation for two requirements:

    • Part 8, Screening will be introduced in two phases. The first phase will affect all manufacturing and explosives vendor magazine licences and will come into force February 1, 2015. The second phase, affecting all other licences and permits, will come into force February 1, 2016; and,
    • Part 4, Export and In-transit permits will come into force February 1, 2015.
  5. Where can I get more information?

    580 Booth Street, 10th Floor
    Ottawa (ON) K1A 0E4
    Tel: 613-948-5200
    Fax: 613-948-5195
    Email: ERDmms@nrcan.gc.ca

    For more information on the Explosives Act and Regulations (including FAQs and guidance materials) please visit our Welcome to Explosives Regulations, 2013 website: www.nrcan.gc.ca/explosives/acts-regulations/9837

Energy Efficiency Regulations

  1. What is the purpose of the Energy Efficiency Act and Regulations?

    The purpose of Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act (Act) and Energy Efficiency Regulations (Regulations) is to ensure that Canadians have access to the most energy efficient products available. This is done by requiring that all regulated products meet energy efficiency standards and/or performance reporting requirements, and that certain products include a label indicating their efficiency performance. Establishing minimum energy performance standards are a cost-effective way to save consumers and businesses money on energy bills. In addition, Canada works with the US when developing energy efficiency standards, to reduce regulatory burden on businesses and ensure a seamless and integrated North American market for the regulated products.

    The Act was first passed in 1992. It was amended in 2009, making it possible to prescribe standards not only for more products that use energy but also for products that affect energy use.

    Regulations have now been established for more than 40 products, including major household appliances, water heaters, heating and air-conditioning equipment, automatic icemakers, dehumidifiers, dry-type transformers, electric motors, commercial refrigeration, home electronics, and some lighting products.

  2. What are the key elements of the Energy Efficiency Regulations?

    The Act and Regulations:

    • identify the energy-using products that NRCan regulates;
    • set minimum energy efficiency standards for regulated products;
    • prohibit the import or the shipment between provinces of energy-using products that do not meet prescribed energy efficiency standards;
    • require people whose businesses manufacture, import, sell or lease energy-using products to file an energy efficiency report with NRCan before importing  them or shipping them from one province to another;
    • require that energy-using products bear an energy efficiency verification mark from a Standards Council of Canada (SCC) accredited certification body to verify their energy efficiency; and
    • require certain types of energy-using products to carry an EnerGuide label or a lamp package label before their first retail sale or lease.
  3. How do the Energy Efficiency Regulations affect Canadian businesses?

    Energy efficiency has important economic benefits. It supports business by reducing operating costs, thereby contributing to Canada's competitiveness in domestic and international markets – which in turn leads to job creation. The energy efficiency industry itself is an important source of jobs and income for Canadians.

  4. What is the timeline for implementation?

    Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations came into effect in February 1995.  Since then, the Regulations have been amended on 13 occasions to keep up with changes in technology. All amendments to the Energy Efficiency Regulations are subject to the World Trade Organization’s six month implementation period following the publication of the amendment in Canada Gazette, Part II.

  5. Where can I get more information?

    For additional information on the Energy Efficiency Regulations and their requirements, please visit our web site: www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/regulations-codes-standards/6845

    Or contact us at:
    Natural Resources Canada
    Office of Energy Efficiency
    Equipment Division
    1 Observatory Crescent
    Building #3
    Ottawa, Ontario 
    K1A 0E4
    Equipment@NRCan-RNCan.gc.ca

  6. Additional FAQs:

    Additional FAQs relating to products regulated by the Energy Efficiency Regulations can be found at: www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/regulations-codes-standards/7287

Export and Import of Rough Diamond Regulations

  1. What is the purpose of this regulation?

    The Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Regulations (the Regulations) enable the implementation of the purposes or provisions of the Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act (the Act). Specifically, the Regulations:

    • set out the requirements for an application for a Canadian Certificate for the export of rough diamonds, as well as for the replacement of a Canadian Certificate;
    • specify the information that the Canadian Certificate for the export of rough diamonds must contain;
    • identify the requirements of the container used to export or import rough diamonds;
    • outline the reporting and record keeping obligations of exporters and importers of rough diamonds; and,
    • state how rough diamonds (and other things) forfeited under the Act may be disposed of by the Minister.
  2. What are the key elements of this regulation?

    An application for a Canadian Certificate for the export of rough diamonds must contain the information required by the Regulations. This includes a declaration signed and dated by the applicant stating that the information contained therein is accurate and, if the diamonds were imported into Canada after January 1, 2003, the serial number of the Kimberley Process Certificate(s) that accompanied the rough diamonds.

    A Canadian Certificate for the export of rough diamonds is valid for a period of 60 days from the date of issue.

    Containers used for the export or import of rough diamonds must meet the requirements set out in the Regulations. For exports, the container must be sealed with a seal that bears a seal number listed on the accompanying Canadian Certificate.

    Exporters must report the export of rough diamonds to the Minister within seven days of export and must keep the records specified in the Regulations for a period of three years.

    Importers must report the import of rough diamonds to the Minister within seven days of import and must keep the records specified in the Regulations for a period of three years.

    Rough diamonds forfeited under the Act that will not re-enter the international rough diamond trade will be disposed of in the manner prescribed by the Regulations.

  3. How does this regulation affect Canadian businesses?

    Businesses seeking to export rough diamonds must submit an application to the Minister containing the information required by the Regulations.

    Exporters and importers must ensure that the containers used for the export or import of rough diamonds meet the requirements set out in the Regulations.

    Exporters and importers of rough diamonds must meet the reporting and record keeping requirements set out in the Regulations.

  4. When was this regulation implemented?

    The Regulations came into force on January 1, 2003, and were last amended on April 20, 2007.

  5. Where can I get more information?

    Kimberley Process Office
    Minerals and Metals Sector
    Natural Resources Canada
    580 Booth Street, 10th floor
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1A 0E4
    Telephone: 613-996-0947
    Toll free: 1-866-539-0766
    Fax: 613-943-2079
    E-mail: kpc-cpk-Canada@nrcan.gc.ca

    For more information on the Kimberley Process (including requirements to export and import rough diamonds), please visit our Kimberley Process for Rough Diamonds website: www.nrcan.gc.ca/mining-materials/kimberley-process/8222

Timber Regulations, 1993

  1. What is the purpose of this regulation?

    The purpose of this Regulation is to outline the terms and conditions that businesses and individuals must comply with when cutting and removing timber from federal lands./p>

  2. What are the key elements of this regulation?

    The key elements include: the process and requirements for permit applicants; the process and requirements for entering into contracts and agreements; and general compliance rules for both permit holders and contractors or operators when cutting and removing timber on federal lands, such as restrictions on road building and timelines for the removal of buildings and other materials from cut sites.

  3. How does this regulation affect Canadian businesses?

    Most of Canada’s forested lands (90%) are owned and managed on behalf of Canadians by provincial and territorial governments (www.nrcan.gc.ca/forests/canada/13169). Federal forested lands include National Parks, Department of National Defence installations, and the Acadian and Petawawa national research forests located in New Brunswick and Ontario, respectively.  Due to this, there is very little commercial forestry taking place on federal lands and thus very little impact of these regulations on Canadian businesses.

  4. What is the timeline for implementation?

    This Regulation is in force.

  5. Where can I get more information?

    Contact us: http://contact-contactez.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/index.cfm?lang=eng&sid=7#

State of Canada’s Forest Regulations

  1. What is the purpose of this regulation?

    This regulation requires the Minister of Natural Resources to prepare, by June 30th of each year, a report that outlines the state of Canada’s forests that includes their contribution to the economy and the environment of Canada and to the social well-being of Canadians.  Annual State of the Forest reports can be found here: http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/series/read/90   

  2. What are the key elements of this regulation?

    The key elements of this regulation are the required date and the required contents of the annual report, such as the ecological and economic contributions of forests.

  3. How does this regulation affect Canadian businesses?

    This regulation has no effect on business as the onus is on the Minister of Natural Resources to produce the annual report. 

  4. What is the timeline for implementation?

    This regulation is in force.

  5. Where can I get more information?

    Contact us: http://contact-contactez.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/index.cfm?lang=eng&sid=7#

National Energy Board Export and Import Reporting Regulations
This regulation is administered by the National Energy Board. For answers to frequently asked questions, please click here.

National Energy Board Act Part IV (Oil and Gas) Regulations
This regulation is administered by the National Energy Board. For answers to frequently asked questions, please click here.

General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations
This regulation is administered by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. For answers to frequently asked questions, please click here.

Toll Information Regulations
This regulation is administered by the National Energy Board. For answers to frequently asked questions, please click here.

Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations
This regulation is administered by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. For answers to frequently asked questions, please click here.

For more information

To learn about upcoming or ongoing consultations on proposed federal regulations, visit the Canada Gazette and Consulting with Canadians websites.