A Preliminary Assessment of Renewable Energy Capacity in Prince George, BC

Authors:

David Flanders, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia
Ellen Pond, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia
Jon Salter, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia
Kristi Tatebe, Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia

Publication Date: March, 2009

Link to External Website: http://calp.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2012/05/CALP_PG_Renewable-Energy-Report_FINAL_REPORT.pdf

Abstract

This report outlines work by the Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning (CALP), University of British Columbia (UBC), to build on and add value to the greenhouse gas (GHG) and renewable energy systems research conducted for the Smart Growth on the Ground (SGOG) process in Prince George, British Colombia in 2008‐2009. Working with the City, SGOG staff and partners, undertook preliminary estimates of potential renewable energy capacity calculated to address the question of the potential renewable energy capacity from the local landscape for the Prince George region. This report presents a framework that is being developed within CALP to assess renewable energy supplies at the community scale. The case study section of this report investigates the potential for renewable energy supply in Prince George, and outlines a method to quantify and spatialize that supply at the community scale exploring biomass potential within the region and solar thermal hot water in the downtown core as examples.

While energy generation potential from biomass and solar thermal are the two focii of this report, the framework for assessing renewable energy supplies at a community scale should be transferable to other sources. Thus, although the work is preliminary and exploratory, it begins to set out a community renewable energy methodology that will provide communities with a better understanding of their local renewable energy supply options. This report also presents an initial review of the social acceptability of alternative energy and carbon reduction measures, looking specifically at barriers and suggesting approaches for addressing them. This report will be useful to local decision‐makers, researchers and citizens in Prince George, and also to energy and carbon mitigation researchers in other communities, as communities strive to reduce GHG emissions and meet the targets necessary to achieve climate stabilization and a livable future.

This work was supported with funding from the Program of Energy Research and Development.