Frequently Asked Questions on Explosives Regulations, 2013 – Parts 11 to 20

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Part 11. Industrial Explosives

This Part deals with the selling, acquiring and storing of explosives used for industrial purposes. Industrial explosives are blasting explosives, as well as perforating explosives used in the oil and gas industry. The explosive types covered are E (high explosives) and I (initiation systems) used in mining, quarrying, construction, or avalanche control.

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

A major change under the Explosives Regulations, 2013 is the elimination of the Purchase and Possession Permit issued by vendors on behalf of the Explosives Regulatory Division. The Explosives Regulations, 2013 formally accept provincial and territorial authorization numbers for users of industrial explosives, in addition to licences and certificates issued under the Explosives Regulations, 2013. Vendors must mark the licence or authorization numbers on all outer packaging. The length of time that records need to be kept will be two years, and the information that needs to be kept in the record has been simplified from previous requirements. The Explosives Regulations, 2013 also address the re-use of packaging.

Q. Why eliminate the Purchase and Possession Permit?

Under the previous Regulations, an explosives vendor could sell up to 75 kilograms and 100 detonators to an individual. That individual could store those explosives for up to 90 days without an explosives magazine. They were generally used by farmers and small quarry operators who were known to the vendor. There were cases where explosives purchased this way were found many years later when clearing out old sheds and barns. Following 9/11, most vendors no longer wanted to assume the liability of selling to someone who did not have a magazine licence and thus would not sell using the Purchase and Possession Permit, even though the Regulations allowed them to do so. For all practical purposes, this permit was no longer used.

Q. Does the seller still have to mark my licence number on cases and reels?

The seller has to mark the purchaser’s licence number in the next available space in the identification “ladder” on the outer package being sold. However, if the outer package is not sealed, then the seller also has to mark the inner packages and things such as the reel-holding detonating cord. If the package is opened after the sale, then it becomes the purchaser’s responsibility to mark the inner packages and reels.

Q. Are there any exceptions to marking numbers on the outer packaging?

The only exceptions to marking the licence, certificate, or provincial or territorial authorization on explosives packages are for intermediate bulk containers or containers holding bulk explosives. No other exceptions apply (e.g., ANFO bags).

Q. What are the requirements for re-using packaging?

To be re-used, packaging must be in good condition, contain no explosive residue, and be used only for the same type of explosive that it previously contained. This will help ensure that the markings are still accurate. However, if a package contained a nitro-glycerine-based explosive (or if a liquid explosive was one of the ingredients), then the package may not be re-used.

Q. Have the procedures for a zone licence changed?

No, but the procedures are now addressed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013 under Part 6.

Q. Does this Part apply to offshore platforms?

Storage on offshore platforms does not need a licence because platforms are covered by a separate regulatory scheme.

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Part 12. Power Device Cartridges

This Part sets out the requirements for selling, acquiring and storing power device cartridges classified as type C.2 as used in industrial power-activated tools such as nail guns.

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

The previous Regulations did not cover power device cartridges, which were regulated as “safety cartridges.” This distinction is important as “safety cartridge” was meant for small arms cartridges and does not apply well to power device cartridges. The previous Regulations use net explosive quantity (mass less the mass of the packaging) to set licensing limits for “safety cartridges” while the Explosives Regulations, 2013 uses the number of “power device cartridges.”

Q. What is the maximum number of power device cartridges that can be stored before a licence is required?

A retailer can store up to 150 000 cartridges that are type C.2 before a licence to sell is required. If the sales establishment is in a dwelling, the maximum number that can be stored is 50 000 cartridges (type C.2). A distributor requires a licence to store and sell any quantity of power device cartridges. Users can store up to 50 000 cartridges (type C.2) before a licence to store is required.

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Part 13. Practical Use Explosives

This Part authorizes the acquisition, storage and sale of special-purpose explosives. These include low-hazard special-purpose explosives such as highway flares, personal distress flares, bird-scaring cartridges, fire extinguisher cartridges, and high-hazard special-purpose explosives such as avalanche air bag systems, explosive bolts, and cable cutters. This Part also deals with the destruction of expired marine flares. A reference to mass in this Part means gross mass (mass including the packaging).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

The major changes to the previous Regulations are:

  • only flares can be displayed for sale;
  • flares displayed for sale need to be inaccessible to the public unless they are in consumer packs, and they must be separated into 25-kilogram lots;
  • all high-hazard practical use explosive sellers must be licensed;
  • records must be kept of all sales of high-hazard practical use explosives and of sales of 100 kilograms or more of low-hazard practical use explosives; and
  • the requirement for distributors of marine flares to collect expired flares, implement a disposal plan, and provide an annual report to the Chief Inspector of Explosives.

Q. What are low-hazard special-purpose explosives?

Low-hazard special-purpose explosives are classified as type S.1 under the new classification system. Examples are highway flares, marine flares, personal distress flares, bird-scaring cartridges, and fire extinguisher cartridges.

Q. What are high-hazard special-purpose explosives?

High-hazard special-purpose explosives are classified as type S.2 under the new classification system. Examples are avalanche air bag systems, explosive bolts, and cable cutters.

Q. Why do distributors of marine flares need to collect and dispose of them?

Marine flares have a life of 48 months as set out by Transport Canada. The disposal of these articles after 48 months has become a problem of collection and actual disposal. Regulations became appropriate to require the distributor selling the marine flares to collect them and dispose of them.

Q. What are the Regulations for disposing of time-expired marine flares?

Distributors of marine flares must submit a disposal plan with their licence application and must follow this plan. Distributors must accept flares that are returned and must dispose of them safely. A yearly report is required on the number of flares collected and disposed of.

Q. What are the licensing limits for low-hazard and high-hazard special-purpose explosives?

All sellers of high-hazard special-purpose explosives, and users storing more than 20 kilograms of high-hazard special-purpose explosives, must be licensed. For low-hazard special-purpose explosives, all distributors must be licensed, as well as any retailer or user who stores more than 1000 kilograms of low-hazard special-purpose explosives.

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Part 14. Small Arms Cartridges, Propellant Powder and Percussion Caps

This Part authorizes the acquisition, storage and sale of small arms cartridges, propellant powder and percussion caps, and includes the requirements for the manufacturing of small arms cartridges and black powder cartouches for personal use. A reference to mass in this Part means the net quantity (mass of the explosives excluding the mass of any packaging, container, shell casing, or projectile).

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

Yes. The changes made are:

  • small arms cartridges defined as up to 19.1 millimetres (.75 calibre) compared to previous 12.7 millimetre (.50 calibre) to harmonize with the United Nations Transport of Dangerous Goods definition;
  • the differentiation of small arms cartridges containing black powder is removed;
  • the quantity of black powder permitted in a detached dwelling is increased to 10 kilograms (consistent with the previous Regulations);
  • the wording on tracer and armour-piercing projectiles is removed;
  • notes added to clarify that the maximum quantity of small arms cartridges refers to 225 kilograms net quantity;
  • clarification that the maximum permitted unlicensed storage of powder in all detached storage units is 75 kilograms at a site, not including the quantity that may be stored in a dwelling; and
  • clarification that secure storage means that persons not authorized are not given unlimited access to small arms cartridges storage areas.

Q. What are the limits on the number of small arms cartridges anyone can purchase and store?

There is no change. The limit is based on the amount of 225 kilograms of explosives in the cartridges. Therefore, the number of cartridges would depend on the calibre, e.g., 2.8 million .22-calibre cartridges or 100 000 12-gauge shot shells. Amounts beyond this would require a magazine licence.

Q. Is there a change in who needs a licence to sell propellant powder?

Under the Explosives Regulations, 2013, an unlicensed seller can keep the same quantities as an unlicensed user in a dwelling and storage unit, but the quantity that can be displayed for sale is 12 kilograms. There is no limit on the number of percussion caps a seller may store or sell provided no more than 10 000 are displayed for sale. There is an added requirement that any unlicensed seller must notify the Chief Inspector of Explosives they are selling. All distributors (those who sell to retailers) will need to be licensed.

Q. Why are there different quantities for storage in a detached dwelling and in other dwellings?

This is a safety issue related to the storage of propellants (including black powder) and the greater risk of exposure to occupants if the propellants are stored in a dwelling other than a detached dwelling rather than in a detached dwelling. In a dwelling other than an attached, a greater number of individuals (and their property) are exposed to a potential incident. Furthermore, individuals in dwellings adjacent to dwellings where propellants are stored are often unaware of their presence and are not aware of the potential risk.

Q. As a retailer, can I store my ammunition on the sales floor?

Full cases of small arms cartridges can be stored on the sales floor during the peak season as long as it is attended when the sales establishment is open for business.

Q. What is acceptable identification?

Acceptable identification is a government-issued photo ID or two pieces of ID, one of which is government issued, that sets out the person’s address.

Q. What is required on the record of sale?

Sellers must keep a record of sale for all propellant powder sold for two years following the date of the sale. The information that must be kept is:

  • the buyer’s name and address, or a licence number issued under the Firearms Act and the expiry date;
  • the type, trade name, size of container, and authorization information;
  • the quantity of powder sold under each trade name; and
  • the date of the sale.

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Part 15. Model and High-Power Rocket Motors

This Part authorizes the acquisition, storage and sale of rocket motors, reloading kits and igniters. It is sub-divided into two divisions. The first part deals with model rocket motors with a maximum total impulse of up to 160 newton-seconds (NFPA alpha designations A to G), while the second part addresses high-power rocket motors (over 160 newton-seconds). The use of high-power rocket motors is regulated under the Aeronautics Act. A reference to mass in this Part means gross mass (mass including packaging).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

There were minimal requirements in the previous Regulations related to rocket motors as they were mostly written before the hobby came into existence. The Explosives Regulations, 2013:

  • introduce controls for high-power motors and motor reloading kits;
  • raise the maximum limit for model rocket motors from 80 to 160 Newton-seconds total impulse (consistent with Transport Canada and the United States);
  • introduce specific controls for high-power rocket motors;
  • introduce provisions for motor reloading kits;
  • introduce age brackets for model rocket motor acquisition (12 years for up to 80 newton-seconds (Class F));
  • introduce a requirement to supply safety information to purchasers of model rocket motors; and
  • address storage requirements for all rocket motors and igniters.

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

Yes. The maximum total impulse permitted for 12- to 17-years-olds was raised from 40 newton-seconds to 80 newton-seconds to harmonize with the United States and Transport Canada, and the requirement to supply safety information was removed.

Q. Why was the total impulse limit raised for model rocket motors?

It was decided to increase the maximum total impulse limit for model rocket motors from 80 newton-seconds to 160 newton-seconds to harmonize with Transport Canada’s definition of high-power rocketry, which begins beyond this limit, and with what has been U.S. practice for many years.

Q. Do the Explosives Regulations, 2013 cover the use of high-power rocket motors?

No, the use of high-power rocket motors and launching of high-power rockets are regulated by Transport Canada.

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Part 16. Consumer Fireworks

Consumer fireworks are fireworks that are designed for recreational use by members of the public. They are different from display fireworks, which are fireworks designed for professional use (these are dealt with in Part 18). This Part sets out the requirements for selling, acquiring, storing and using consumer fireworks. All references to mass in this Part mean gross mass (mass of the article including packaging).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

The key changes made in the Explosives Regulations, 2013 include:

  • requirements for the storage and sale of consumer fireworks in sales establishments;
  • display for sale areas of the retail outlet separated into areas accessible by the public and not accessible by the public;
  • consumer packs that contain only low-level fireworks or aerial-type articles in approved transport packaging may be accessible by the public. Any fireworks not in a consumer pack or approved transport packaging must be behind the sales counter or placed in a locked cabinet;
  • a record of sale is required for purchases of consumer fireworks over 150 kilograms; and
  • retailers must offer purchasers a copy of the table at the end of Part 16 or a document that includes the same information.

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

Yes. Aerial-type articles may now be displayed for sale and accessible by the public provided they are kept in approved transport packaging.

Q. Can I sell consumer fireworks from my house?

It is prohibited to sell consumer fireworks from a dwelling.

Q. Can I sell consumer fireworks from a tent or a trailer?

Consumer fireworks can be sold from a tent or trailer under the Explosives Regulations; 2013; however, they must be located at least 8 metres from any flammable substances, combustible material, sources of ignition, thoroughfares, buildings, or other temporary retail outlet, and at least 3 metres from any vehicle parking area. The fireworks must be attended at all times.

Q. Can I sell consumer fireworks where the public has access?

The Explosives Regulations, 2013 specify how consumer fireworks must be displayed when accessible to the public. These include the requirement that the consumer fireworks must be in consumer packs, and the consumer packs can only contain flares, fountains, snakes, ground spinners, strobe pots, wheels, or ground whistles. Aerial-type articles are also permitted if kept in approved transport packaging. Consumer packs, or articles in approved transport packaging, must be separated into lots of 100 kilograms or less, and each lot must be separated from the other lots. Otherwise, the fireworks must be kept behind a sales counter or locked up (for example, in a cabinet). Fireworks that are not in consumer packs or approved transport packaging must be separated into lots of 25 kilograms or less.

Q. Do I need to keep a record of the sale?

The seller must keep a record for every sale of 150 kilograms or more of consumer fireworks for two years after the date of the sale.

Q. How much consumer fireworks can I store at one time without a licence?

Up to 1000 kilograms of consumer fireworks, including those on display, can be stored in a sales establishment at any one time without a licence. If the sales establishment is located in a building that contains a dwelling, no more than 100 kilograms may be stored in the establishment at any one time, including consumer fireworks that are on display. A sales establishment includes all storage either inside or outside that is used in operating the establishment.

Q. Where do I store the consumer fireworks that are not on display for sale?

For unlicensed storage, consumer fireworks must be stored in a storage unit as specified in the Explosives Regulations, 2013 when not on display for sale. If a licence has been issued, the consumer fireworks must be stored in the magazine specified on the licence.

Q. What is the minimum age to purchase consumer fireworks?

You must be 18 years of age or older to purchase consumer fireworks. A person under the age of 18 may use consumer fireworks if they are directly supervised by a person 18 years or older.

Q. How much consumer fireworks can I store in my house?

A person can store up to 10 kilograms of consumer fireworks in a dwelling at any one time. If storing more than 10 kilograms but less than 1000 kilograms, the consumer fireworks must be stored in a storage unit. If storing over 1000 kilograms, a Magazine licence from the Explosives Regulatory Division is required.

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Part 17. Special Effect Pyrotechnics

This Part sets out the requirements for selling, acquiring, storing and using special effect pyrotechnics. It sets out when a person does or does not need a licence or certificate, and sets out how to obtain a fireworks operator certificate for special effect pyrotechnics. All references to mass in this Part mean gross mass (mass of the article including packaging), except in the case of propellant powder where it is net explosive quantity (mass of the powder excluding the packaging).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

There are minimal references to special effect pyrotechnics in the previous Regulations. The key changes include:

  • introduction of the fireworks operator certificate – pyrotechnician, senior pyrotechnician, and special effects pyrotechnician;
  • specific requirements for the safe handling of special effect pyrotechnics including pre-firing procedures, written plans, and setting up danger zones; and
  • specific requirements for the safe handling of special effect pyrotechnics that do not require a fireworks operator certificate (flash paper, flash string, and sparkle string).

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

Yes. All restrictions on wireless firing units were eliminated and the quantity of black powder with may be stored in a detached dwelling was raised to 10 kilograms. Minor changes to the wording were made to improve the clarity of the Regulations.

Q. When is a licence or fireworks operator certificate not required?

A fireworks operator certificate or a licence is not required to purchase, store, and use up to 200 grams of flash cotton, 1 kilogram of flash paper, 200 grams of flash string, and 200 grams of sparkle string. A licence or certificate is also not required for the use of propellant powder in an activity involving the use of reproduction or original firearms provided that the individual is accompanied by, or under the supervision of, a person who has the written consent of the local authority to carry out the activity and the person has adequate experience in, or has completed a course certified by the Minister of Natural Resources on, the safe use of special effect pyrotechnics and propellant powder in historical re-enactments.

Q. How do I get certified to use pyrotechnics for stage, film and television?

A pyrotechnics safety and legal awareness course offered by the Explosives Regulatory Division, or a course approved by the Minister of Natural Resources, must first be taken. Once the course is successfully completed, the fireworks operator certificate (pyrotechnician) can be applied for.

Q. If I am taking a course on pyrotechnics at college or university, do I need to be certified to use the pyrotechnics?

As part of the course, if a student is under the direct supervision of a holder of a fireworks operator certificate (senior pyrotechnician or special effects pyrotechnician), the student can use the pyrotechnics that the supervisor is authorized to use.

Q. Can I store special effect pyrotechnics in my house?

Special effect pyrotechnics can be stored in a dwelling; however, the quantities stored depend on what is being stored and in what type of dwelling. The maximum quantity of special effect pyrotechnics that can be stored in a dwelling is 25 kilograms and 500 electric matches. If propellant powder is being stored, the maximum quantity is 25 kilograms (10 kilograms if black powder) if being stored in a detached dwelling. If it is a dwelling other than a detached dwelling, the maximum quantity of propellant powder that can be stored is reduced to 20 kilograms (1 kilogram if black powder).

Q. Do I need a licence to sell special effect pyrotechnics?

All sellers of special effect pyrotechnics must be licensed to sell.

Q. Do I need approval to use pyrotechnics in an event?

The written approval of the local authority must be obtained before any event containing special effect pyrotechnics takes place.

Q. If I have the fireworks operator certificate (pyrotechnician), can I work on a film set where special-purpose pyrotechnics such as black powder and gas effects are being used?

If you are under the direct supervision of a holder of a fireworks operator certificate (special effects pyrotechnician), the holder of a fireworks operator certificate (pyrotechnician) can work on any event where special-purpose pyrotechnics are being used.

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Part 18. Display Fireworks

This Part sets out the requirements for selling, acquiring, storing and using display fireworks. It sets out how to obtain a fireworks operator certificate for display fireworks and sets out additional Regulations for firecrackers. All references to mass in this Part mean gross mass (mass of the article including packaging).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

The key changes from the previous Regulations include:

  • introduction of the fireworks operator certificate – assistant, supervisor, and endorsements;
  • specific requirements for the safe handling of display fireworks – pre-firing procedures, written plans, setting up danger zones, etc., and
  • specific requirements for acquiring and using firecrackers.

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

Yes. All restrictions on wireless firing units were eliminated.

Q. Do I need a licence to sell display fireworks?

All sellers of display fireworks must be licensed. A licence means a licence that authorizes the storage of display fireworks and fireworks accessories.

Q. Who can I sell display fireworks to?

Display fireworks can be sold to a person who holds a licence or to a user who holds a fireworks operator certificate (display supervisor) that authorizes them to use the fireworks. The user must provide a copy of the approval of the local authority to hold the display in which the fireworks will be used.

Q. Can I store display fireworks without a licence?

A person with a fireworks operator certificate (display supervisor) in charge of the fireworks display may store up to 125 kilograms of fireworks and 500 electric matches in a storage unit if approval has been obtained from the local authority to do so.

Q. If I want to work on the fireworks crew on Canada Day, do I need to be certified?

Any person handling display fireworks must have a fireworks operator certificate (display assistant or display supervisor). A person holding a fireworks operator certificate (display assistant) may use fireworks in a fireworks display under the direct supervision of the display supervisor in charge. To obtain this certification, a person must first take the display fireworks safety and legal awareness course offered by the Explosives Regulatory Division, or a course approved by the Minister of Natural Resources. Once the course is successfully completed, the person may obtain the fireworks operator certificate (display assistant).

Q. What qualifications do I need to conduct my own fireworks display using display fireworks?

Every person who organizes a fireworks display must ensure that the display is supervised by a display supervisor in charge. The display supervisor in charge must have a fireworks operator certificate (display supervisor). To obtain this certificate, the person must have acted as a display assistant in at least three fireworks displays within the five years after the date on which the applicant completed the display fireworks safety and legal awareness course, or a course approved by the Minister of Natural Resources.

Q. Do I need to be certified to use firecrackers since they are classified as display fireworks?

A fireworks operator certificate is not required to purchase, store and use firecrackers. Anyone can apply for the firecracker use certificate, which allows the holder of this certificate to use the firecrackers at a specific time and location. To obtain this certificate, a person must demonstrate that they are able to safely use firecrackers and that adequate safety precautions have been taken to minimize the likelihood of harm to persons or property created by their use. If a persons holds a fireworks operator certificate (display supervisor), a firecracker use certificate is not required; however, permission from the local authority is still required.

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Part 19. Fees

This Part sets out the fees payable for the issuance of licences, permits and certificates. The fee schedule came into effect on June 1, 2009, as per the User Fees Act (UFA).

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

This part brings forward into the Explosives Regulations, 2013 the fee schedule that came into effect on June 1, 2009. There are no changes.

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Part 20. Restricted Components

This Part regulates the most significant restricted components used to manufacture explosives (ten in total) and contains the Restricted Component Regulations that came into force in June 2008 (ammonium nitrate) and March 2009 (the other nine substances). It describes the security requirements for these materials and sets out the obligations for suppliers. An addition is being introduced to cover sellers who sell products made from restricted components.

Q. What has changed in the Explosives Regulations, 2013?

The separate legislation regulating restricted components that came into force in June 2008 and March 2009 are being integrated into the Explosives Regulations, 2013 for completeness. Once the Explosives Regulations, 2013 come into force, the stand-alone legislation will be superseded. Changes between the previous restricted component legislation and that in the Explosives Regulations, 2013 are:

Administrative modifications:

  • stakeholder name changes from “sellers’’ to “component sellers’’;
  • inclusion of technically pure ammonium nitrate (AN);
  • removal of UN numbers for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric acid (HNO3);
  • triggering concentration for nitric acid (HNO3) sellers has been increased from ‘’≥68%’’ to ‘’≥75%’’;
  • UN number 1499 (potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate mixtures) is now defined as a separate restricted component;
  • addition of further farmer ID options;
  • addition of a dual ID option for stakeholders who cannot provide any of the other ID options;
  • addition of ‘’annual sales’’ on the application form to provide authority to include the consignment type sellers who do not have storage quantities;
  • formalizing the addition of annual sales contracts permitting in order to reduce the frequency of collecting some data in the sales records; and
  • further addition of clarity on the sales record-keeping exception when below threshold level sales.

Operational modifications:

  • for all ammonium nitrate (AN) applications, an indication that a security plan is in place is now a prerequisite of the application itself.

New additions:

  • a new group of stakeholders has been added: product sellers.

Q. Were any changes made as a result of comments from Canada Gazette, Part I?

The only changes made were to correct references and typos.

Q. Are there any implications for currently enrolled sellers?

There are no implications for currently enrolled sellers except that they have additional options for acceptable ID, and for the sellers of nitric acid of a concentration that is less than 75%.

Q. Do the currently enrolled sellers of nitric acid of less than 75% need to de-enrol?

Only sellers who sell nitric acid in concentrations of 75% or higher need to be enrolled. Any seller who sells concentrations of less than 75% will need to de-enrol following the coming into force of the Explosives Regulations, 2013.

Q. What is a product seller?

A product seller means a person or company producing products that contain, or are made from, restricted components. All the requirements of a component seller apply to a product seller with the exception of ID verifications and sales record-keeping. A security plan will be required for product sellers using ammonium nitrate.

Q. Must a copy of the buyer’s ID be kept?

The Regulations do not require that a copy of the buyer’s ID be taken.  For each sale under Part 20 of the Explosives Regulations, 2013, sections 473 and 490 require the buyer to establish their identity by providing one of the documents listed.  Sections 475(1)(d) and 492(1)(d) only require the type of ID provided by recorded along with document’s reference number.  This is either done at the point of sale or by the driver upon delivery.

Q. What documents are acceptable for ID?

Sections 473 and 490 list the acceptable documents to establish a buyer’s ID.

  • The buyer’s explosives manufacturing licence or certificate
  • The buyer’s enrolment number to sell restricted components
  • Government issued ID with a photograph of the buyer
  • The buyer’s provincial pesticide licence
  • The buyer’s Canadian Wheat Board identification number
  • The buyer’s Producteur Agricole number
  • The buyer’s Ontario Federation of Agriculture number
  • The buyer’s business licence or corporate registration
  • Proof of the buyer’s registration under the Controlled Goods Regulations