Technology transfer

In a rapidly evolving global economy, Canada has achieved an enviable record of innovation and accomplishment, yet faces increasing competition for international markets and investment.

To succeed in this environment, Canada must continue to develop and to market leading-edge technologies. The effective utilization of technology is a vital component in obtaining a competitive economic advantage.

As a result of the Canadian Forest Service’s (CFS) research work, intellectual property (IP) is created. This IP may be created by the CFS alone or in collaboration with various academic, industry or provincial stakeholders. Although various federal government programs encourage the development of IP, there is an ongoing need to ensure the fullest possible utilization of this property through its transfer to Canadian industry.

IP is an asset of tangible value, and as such is of significant importance to the CFS. As with any other major asset, IP must be carefully managed. The effective control and exploitation of IP are essential elements in the fulfillment of the CFS mandate and the commitment to help Canada increase and maintain its competitive edge.

With the following technology, CFS is looking for partnerships, collaborations and/or licencees to further their development or application.

For assistance with technology transfer and IP issues in the Canadian Forest Service, please contact Kathryn Buchanan.


Biocontrol method for reedgrass

This method, based on the discovery of microbes that can suppress the growth of marsh reedgrass (Calamagrostis canadensis) is available for commercialization. The method involves the inundative use of endemic (native) pathogens to suppress reedgrass in reforestation areas, allowing conifers to reach the "free-to-grow"stage by reducing competition and snow press caused by the grass.

Main use

  • Regeneration of boreal forests.
  • Grass control along irrigation canals, roadsides, etc.
  • Spin-off technology applicable to control of other grass weeds.
  • Spin-off technology applicable to straw degradation/removal.

Main advantage

  • Can be used in situations where chemical herbicides are not desired.
  • Environmentally safe.
  • Effective in high-straw areas where chemicals perform poorly.
  • Does not injure the tree crop, as herbicides sometimes do.

Technology transfer strategy

The "Know-How" for this technology is availabe. Licensing is available internationally.

Patent information

  • USA 5,472,690
  • Canadian patent is pending

Contacts

Business aspects: Kathryn Buchanan

Technical aspects: Dr. Richard Winder


Drift-free pesticide atomizer

Drift-free pesticide atomizer

Drift-free pesticide atomizer

This new spray technology provides sprays without a small drop component, allowing essentially drift-free pesticide applications either from the air or the ground thus avoiding environmental side-effects and product waste.

Main use

Pesticides are widely used in agriculture, forestry and right-of-way management. However, the users and the public are concerned about the side-effects of pesticide use, and one area of concern is spray drift from ground-based and aerial pesticide spray applications. This occurs when part of the spray cloud is carried by the wind to locations outside the pesticide treatment area, where it can cause unwanted environmental impact. This problem is largely caused by the presence of small drops in the spray cloud. Various means have been devised to control spray drift including the development of new atomizers and tank-mix additives designed to reduce the small drop component. To date these efforts have met with partial success, and there is still a need for an atomization device that provides better control of the small drop fraction of the cloud, to reduce or eliminate off-target deposit from ground-based and aerial pesticide applications. The novel atomizer technology developed at CFS Sault Ste. Marie provides sprays without a small drop component, allowing essentially drift-free pesticide applications either from the air or the ground.

Main advantages

  • More environmentally friendly pesticide applications, with reduced environmental impact
  • Increased pesticide application efficiency, by reducing the amount of active ingredient wasted through spray drift
  • Suitable for use in agricultural, forestry or right-of-way pesticide applications, from the air or ground
  • Compatible with existing boom and nozzle dispersal systems
  • Applicable to other industrial processes for small drop control

Technology transfer strategy

This technology is available for license Worldwide.

Patent information

  • USA 5,246,166
  • Australia 663,892
  • PCT (Canada pending)

Contacts

Business aspects: Kathryn L. Buchanan

Technical aspects: Dr. Nick Payne


LUMINOC® insect trap

LUMINOC®, a portable luminous trap for nocturnal insects, is the result of 5 years of extensive research at the Canadian Forest Service, Laurentian Forestry Centre.

Main use

LUMINOC® insect trap

LUMINOC® insect trap

Its small size and long operation life make the LUMINOC® trap an ideal tool for monitoring insect populations in order to characterize forest biodiversity or to survey pests. The trap is also useful for controlling insects in closed or limited areas. It may be used in either forestry or agriculture. Collectors will equally appreciate the LUMINOC®'s versatility as it can also be used as a pit-light trap to survey ground fauna.

Main advantage

Environmentally friendly, the LUMINOC® is safe to use and easy to operate.

Technology transfer strategy

LUMINOC® has undergone extensive field testing by CFS and has proven itself in exacting research applications. LUMINOC® is a registered trademark.

The technology is currently licensed to Comlab Inc. for manufacture and sale. Other licensing opportunities are available for companies that would be able to manufacture and market LUMINOC®. The company would possess the necessary electronic and plastic capabilities to efficiently manufacture the product. 

A license agreement for manufacture and sale will be negotiated with an acceptable company.

Supplementary information

Publications

Contacts

Business aspects: Kathryn Buchanan

Technical aspects: Dr. Christian Hébert