Infographic: The climate is changing and so are Canada's forests

See six ways Canada’s forest sector and communities are adapting to climate change in this map.

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Map of Canada about adapting to climate change in Canada’s forests. There are six short descriptions of adaptation actions and each description is represented on the map by an icon: (1) fire-proofing communities represented by a flame that is shown on the map in several regions throughout the country; (2) planting tree species with greater drought tolerance represented by a thermometer all red in a drop of water that is shown on the map in the aspen parkland; (3) planting trees from a wider range of seed sources represented by a seedling shown on the map in different regions throughout the country; (4) adjusting forest harvest schedules to minimize severe insect damage represented by three insects – spruce budworm shown on the map in the east, mountain pine beetle shown on the map in the west, and the gypsy moth shown on the map in the east; (5) reducing damage to forests from wind storms represented by a cloud with wind curl and lightning shown in only one area on the map in the east; (6) finding ways to use wood from dead and damaged trees represented by a pile of wood icon shown on the map mostly in the west and a few in the east.
 
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Map of Canada about adapting to climate change in Canada’s forests. There are six short descriptions of adaptation actions and each description is represented on the map by an icon: (1) fire-proofing communities represented by a flame that is shown on the map in several regions throughout the country; (2) planting tree species with greater drought tolerance represented by a thermometer all red in a drop of water that is shown on the map in the aspen parkland; (3) planting trees from a wider range of seed sources represented by a seedling shown on the map in different regions throughout the country; (4) adjusting forest harvest schedules to minimize severe insect damage represented by three insects – spruce budworm shown on the map in the east, mountain pine beetle shown on the map in the west, and the gypsy moth shown on the map in the east; (5) reducing damage to forests from wind storms represented by a cloud with wind curl and lightning shown in only one area on the map in the east; (6) finding ways to use wood from dead and damaged trees represented by a pile of wood icon shown on the map mostly in the west and a few in the east.