Indicator: Production

In 2016, Canadian production of solid wood products saw strong growth thanks to rising U.S. demand, while production of pulp and paper continued to decline.

  • Production of softwood lumber increased by 6.2% and production of structural panels increased by 9.6% in 2016 over 2015 levels. This is the highest level of production for these two products since 2008, though still below historical peaks.
  • Newsprint production fell by 4%, and production of printing and writing papers and of wood pulp showed small declines, 1.4% and 0.3%, respectively.

Canada is the world’s largest producer of newsprint, the largest producer of northern bleached softwood kraft pulp and the second-largest producer of softwood lumber.

Production of Canadian forest products, 2006–2016
Graph displaying, in millions of tonnes, the production volume of newsprint, printing and writing paper, and wood pulp for each year between 2006 and 2016.
Graph displaying, in millions of cubic metres, the production volume of softwood lumber and structural wood panels for each year between 2006 and 2016.
Graph data
Table displays, in millions of tonnes, the production volume of newsprint, printing and writing paper, and wood pulp for each year between 2006 and 2016.
Year Newsprint Printing and writing paper Wood pulp
2006 7.12 6.11 23.44
2007 6.64 5.95 22.11
2008 5.99 5.27 20.37
2009 4.38 4.43 17.10
2010 4.64 4.07 18.54
2011 4.38 3.77 18.34
2012 3.87 3.31 17.15
2013 3.97 3.47 17.25
2014 4.01 3.26 16.96
2015 3.51 3.04 16.55
2016 3.35 2.99 16.51
 
Table displays, in millions of cubic metres, the production volume of softwood lumber and structural wood panels for each year between 2006 and 2016.
Year Softwood lumber Structural wood panels
2006 79.17 12.39
2007 70.55 10.18
2008 56.00 6.61
2009 44.23 5.39
2010 51.92 5.99
2011 51.94 6.25
2012 54.54 6.70
2013 57.51 7.13
2014 58.16 7.69
2015 62.97 7.97
2016 66.86 8.73

Why is this indicator important?

  • Canada is one of the top manufacturers of forest products in the world.
  • Production is one of the first indicators to respond to economic and market challenges.

What is the outlook?

  • In the short term, fibre supply constraints and the ongoing Canada–U.S. softwood lumber dispute will likely negatively impact the production of softwood lumber and, to a lesser degree, of structural panels.
  • Production of engineered wood products is expected to be positive, although this segment is still very small overall.
  • Production of paper products will continue to vary, with growth in consumer segments (tissue paper and packaging) partially offsetting further declines in newsprint and printing and writing paper.
  • Production of wood pulp is expected to remain stable, as robust demand overseas offsets decreasing domestic consumption.
Sources
Note
  • Data used for lumber production include total softwood production for Canada.