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Affecting

Scrap Metal (and Other) Recycling Facilities

FOREWORD

With support from the Government of Canada Action Plan 2000 on Climate Change, the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries (CARI) decided to update and revise its files on environmental legislation across Canada. This 2004 undertaking focussed on regulations and guidelines at the federal and provincial levels dealing with environmental protection, human health and worker safety. All related government contacts are identified as well.

The objective of this effort is to provide the regulatory context for the scrap metal recycling industry in Canada and to help it establish and implement environmental practices and procedures that address the need for environmental stewardship. Much of this information will also be beneficial to recycling facilities that process nonmetallic materials as well. This valuable information is posted on the Recycling in Canada web site so that facility managers can ensure that their operations are in compliance.

Caveat: In light of the dynamic nature of regulation, the attached summaries should be regarded as indicative only. Browsers are encouraged to consult the relevant web sites of federal and provincial environment ministries and the Queen's Printer frequently for new policies and regulations, as well as amendments to those included on these pages. Contact information may change over time as well.

OVERVIEW OF RELEVANT ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION

INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL AGREEMENTS

Over the last decade, various modifications to Canada's international obligations on transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials have emerged. The following provides an overview of the main international agreements relating to wastes and recyclable materials to which Canada in a Party.

BASEL CONVENTION ON THE CONTROL OF TRANSBOUNDARY MOVEMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTES AND THEIR DISPOSAL, 1989

International concern about the transboundary movement and disposal of hazardous wastes heightened during the late 70's and early 80's. The key area of concern was the issue of wastes being exported from industrialized nations for cheap disposal in inadequately prepared sites in developing countries. This concern led to a new urgency for developing and implementing international controls. It culminated in the landmark global convention under the United Nations to control the transboundary movement of hazardous wastes and their disposal, commonly called the Basel Convention. Canada participated in the development of the Convention and was one of the original signatories on March 22, 1989.

In 1992, Canada ratified the Basel Convention, which controls the transboundary movement of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials, and promotes their environmentally sound management, and introduced new Export and Import of Hazardous Waste Regulations (EIHWR). The main objectives of the Basel Convention are to:

  • ensure the generation of hazardous waste is reduced to a minimum;
  • dispose of hazardous wastes in the country of their generation, to the extent possible;
  • establish enhanced controls on exports and imports of hazardous waste;
  • prohibit shipments of hazardous wastes to countries lacking the legal, administrative and technical capacity to manage and dispose of them in an environmentally sound manner; and,
  • cooperate on the exchange of information, technology transfer, and harmonization of standards, codes and guidelines.

In February 1998, Parties to the Convention adopted an amendment to add two new detailed wastes lists to the Convention: the hazardous waste list (Annex VIII) and the non-hazardous waste list (Annex IX), which entered into force on February 27, 1999.

OECD DECISION CONTROLLING TRANSBOUNDARY MOVEMENTS OF WASTES DESTINED FOR RECOVERY OPERATIONS, C(2001)/107/Final

In effect since March 1992, governing the transboundary movements of hazardous wastes destined for recycling, the OECD Decision provides a framework to control transboundary movement of hazardous recyclable materials among Member Countries in an environmentally sound and economically efficient manner. It was introduced in response to adoption of the new waste Annexes under Basel and represents a risk-based approach to determining levels of controls for hazardous recyclables, while the Basel Convention is based on hazardous characteristics.

Risk-Based Control Recyclable materials that pose negligible risks for the environment and human health during transboundary movement within the OECD area do not need to be controlled while in transit. However, if these same recyclables are contaminated by others in a way that increases environmental risks or prevents their recycling (in an environmentally sound manner), they are subject to the same controls for recyclable materials listed as hazardous when crossing national borders.

In addition, under the Decision, all recyclable materials, including those that are not controlled, must be recycled at an authorized facility.

CANADA-U.S. AGREEMENT CONCERNING THE TRANSBOUNDARY MOVEMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTES, 1999

In effect since 1986 and amended in 1992, the Canada-USA Agreement is intended to ensure that the movement of hazardous waste and municipal solid waste destined for final disposal crossing the Canada-U.S. border is consistent with domestic law and its provisions. It confirms basic principles recognized by both countries in this area and includes a prior informed consent regime.

Note: Also of interest to recyclers is work initiated by the OECD and Basel on the definition of "environmentally sound manner" and "environmentally sound management (ESM)." In 1999, the OECD started working toward the development of an international Environmentally Sound Management (ESM) Guideline to improve and harmonize the environmental practices of hazardous waste management facilities in OECD countries. Workshops were held in order to elaborate on and develop the elements of an ESM framework. This work was the basis to develop the criteria in the proposed Regulations, through which the Minister can refuse to issue a permit if he or she is of the opinion that the hazardous waste or hazardous recyclable material will not be managed in a manner that will protect the environment and human health.


FEDERAL LEGISLATION

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (CEPA)

The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) has been in force since 1988. A revised version of the Act came into force in 1999. A substantial portion of the 1988 Act dealt with the identification, control and/or prevention of toxic substances in the environment, and the promotion of life?cycle management of toxic substances. CEPA 1999 takes this approach a step further, acknowledging the need to eradicate essentially all persistent and bioaccumulative substances from the environment. CEPA 1999 maintains additional legal objectives, which include reducing pollution caused by the dispersal of nutrients in Canadian waters and addressing the inconsistencies in environmental regulations applicable to federal works or undertakings on federal lands. CEPA also fulfills Canada's international and national commitments with respect to regulating air pollution and ocean dumping.

1999 CEPA Amendments Revisions to CEPA in March 1999 introduced new authorities with respect to hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials, including the authority to:

  • prohibit exports, imports or transits of wastes and recyclable materials where required by Canada's international obligations;
  • develop criteria to assess the ESM of transboundary wastes and recyclable materials, and to refuse permits for exports, imports or transits if these criteria are not met;
  • issue permits for the "equivalent level of environmental safety," allowing for variances from the regulations under specific conditions; and
  • require the preparation and implementation of plans to reduce or phase out exports of wastes destined for final disposal.

National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) Under CEPA 99, companies are required to report annually on pollution they release to the environment. Reporting applies to facilities that meet certain requirements. The Act establishes authority to impose environmental protection measures on businesses that are subject to federal legislative control (such as interprovincial carriers) or that operate on federal lands. Restrictions may also be imposed on operations that discharge contaminants into the air resulting in transboundary air pollution.

TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS ACT (TDGA)

Applies "to all handling, offering to transport, whether or not for hire or reward and whether or not the goods originate from or are destined for any place or places in Canada." Passed in 1980, the TDGA promotes public safety before, during, and after the transportation of dangerous goods including hazardous wastes. The transboundary movement of wastes and recyclable materials is controlled domestically by the Act. The TDGA is administered by Transport Canada, with technical support from Environment Canada, on matters related to hazardous waste. The key features of the Act include the classification of dangerous goods, requirements for documentation, marking (placards) and packaging, emergency response procedures, training, notification and inspections.

Prior to 2002, the Act also included tracking requirements for the transportation of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials (e.g., manifests and prior notification). The administration of that portion of the Act has now been delegated to Environment Canada, and the enabling legislation can be found under CEPA. The Canadian Emergency Transportation Centre (CANUTEC) has been set up to deal with transportation emergencies.

Note: The introduction in CEPA 1999 of a new authority to control the movement of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable material led to the removal, in August 2002, of the manifest-tracking requirements from the TDGR. Simultaneously with this repeal, amendments to the EIHWR with respect to the tracking of exports and imports of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials through the use of a manifest system came into force.

Shipment of Goods Originating Outside Canada The Canadian Transportation of Dangerous Goods regulations (TDGR) permit most shipments of dangerous goods originating outside Canada to be prepared in accordance with other regulations. TDG regulations must be consulted for conditions and limitations. Shipments of dangerous goods by air are regulated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Marine shipments are covered by the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code. Road and rail shipments originating in the United States can be prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Hazardous Materials regulations. The 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Regulations have similar provisions for road and rail shipments originating in Canada that are destined to the United States. The 49 CFR must be consulted for the conditions and limitations.

EXPORT AND IMPORT OF HAZARDOUS WASTES AND RECYCLABLES Proposed.

Domestic responsibility for setting controls to manage hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials resides at both the federal and provincial levels. The federal government regulates the transboundary movements of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable materials (i.e., exports from and imports into Canada as well as interprovincial/territorial movements).

Provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the licensing of hazardous wastes and hazardous recyclable material generators, carriers and treatment facilities and for regulating intraprovincial movements. Both levels of government are concerned with ensuring that hazardous wastes and recyclable materials are handled safely and in a manner that protects the environment and human health.

Canada's evolving international obligations, as well as the broader scope of the export, import and transit provisions of CEPA 1999, led Environment Canada to develop the proposed Regulations for the Export and Import of Hazardous Wastes and Hazardous Recyclable Materials. In March 2004, Environment Canada published new regulations under CEPA 99 to replace the Export and Import of Hazardous Wastes regulation.

In line with the revised OECD Decision, the definition of "hazardous recyclable material" in the proposed Regulations excludes four streams of recyclable materials that are not controlled within the OECD. These four streams of recyclable materials are controlled, however, if they are contaminated by other materials to an extent that increases risks to the environment or prevents the recycling of the materials in an environmentally sound manner.

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ACT (CEAA)

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act is designed to ensure that projects that are carried out, funded, permitted or licensed by the federal government are properly scrutinized by authorities and demonstrate a solid commitment to sustainable development and the promotion of a healthy economy and environment. The Act is also intended to prevent any projects associated with the federal government from having any adverse environmental effects outside the jurisdictions in which they are undertaken. The Act is binding on all federal departments, agencies and Crown corporations.

The Act is administered by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA), an independent agency that reports to the Minister directly. The success of the Act since its implementation five years ago is currently being reviewed.

Environmental assessment acts at the provincial level have not been listed in this Appendix. At the time of researching the provincial legislation, it appeared that scrap metal recycling projects did not meet the criteria for assessment in most provinces. The assessment acts were consequently omitted. The reader should, nonetheless, be informed of the existence of this important environmental legislation in many provinces and territories. The provincial conditions may change subsequent to the operational review of the Act at the federal level or through other developments in environmental law.

CANADA WATER ACT

The Canada Water Act is divided into four parts. Part I, Comprehensive Water Resource Management, authorizes the Minister of the Environment to establish consultative arrangements and to finalize agreements with the provinces respecting waters that are of significant national interest. Part II, Water Quality Management, allows the Minister to conclude agreements with provincial jurisdictions in designating certain areas as "water quality management areas" when the water quality therein has become a matter of urgent national concern. Part III, nutrients, which contains provisions concerning allowable concentrations of nutrients in water treatment processes, was incorporated into CEPA by proclamation in 1988. Guidelines originally issued under this part of the Act are now listed under CEPA. These include the Canadian Drinking Water Quality Guidelines and the Guidelines For Effluent and Waste Water Treatment at Federal Establishments. Part IV deals with administration and enforcement of the Act.

Part II, Section 9, covers the unlicensed dumping of wastes into the water of a water quality management area. It further forbids dumping wastes in any place, or under any conditions, such that the waste or the derivatives of that waste might flow into the waters of the protected area.

FISHERIES ACT

This Act is designed to protect fish, shellfish, crustaceans and marine animals in Canadian fishing zones, all Canadian territorial seas and all internal Canadian waters. The Fisheries Act contains more stringent prohibitions against pollution of Canadian waters than does the Canada Water Act. Under the Canada Water Act, an operator cannot allow waste, either directly or indirectly, to enter specified regions of sensitive water. Under the Fisheries Act it is an offence to carry on undertakings that result in the harmful alteration, disruption or destruction of fish habitat, or to deposit or cause or permit the deposit of material or substances that are detrimental to fish in water that is frequented by fish. The owner of the pollutant and/or anyone who causes or contributes to the spill must report the spill and immediately take any action necessary to respond to and clean up the spill. Regulations have been established allowing certain specific deposits of deleterious substances for specific contaminants.

Determination of Jurisdiction It is important to determine which form of government has primary responsibility in particular circumstances. In non?coastal provinces federal authority concerning aspects of fisheries administration has been delegated to the province. Accordingly, a company discharging effluent into a municipal drainage system that could affect fish would normally be the concern of the province or municipal authorities. If there is inconsistency between different requirements, the general practical approach to follow is to comply with the most stringent requirement.

NUCLEAR SAFETY AND CONTROL ACT

The Nuclear Safety and Control Act is intended to limit the risks to national security, public health and the environment inherent in generating nuclear energy and handling radioactive substances. The act also ensures that Canada upholds its international agreements relating to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.

There are two sections of potential interest for the scrap metal recycling industry. Section 26 prohibits any unlicensed person from transporting, possessing, storing, transferring, importing, exporting, disposing, using or abandoning a nuclear substance. Section 45 states that any person who has reasonable grounds for believing that an event threatening irradiation of people or of the environment beyond certain thresholds must immediately report the circumstances and location of the event to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission or another appropriate local authority. Failure to do so constitutes a federal offence.

PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL LEGISLATION

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

All provinces and territories have established Environmental Acts which tend to have broad applicability to industry. They usually contain requirements related to a wide range of activities, including:

  • release of substances which have an adverse effect on the environment;
  • establishment of waste management systems, including: collection, transportation, handling, storage, treatment, use, diversion, recycling, re-use, recovery, reduction or disposal of waste;
  • air quality management;
  • assessment and remediation of contaminated sites;
  • handling of dangerous goods and waste dangerous goods;
  • registration and review of proposed undertakings (projects) (for their potential environmental impacts); and,
  • the issuing of Certificates of Approval for certain types of facilities and/or activities.

Each Act is accompanied by a different array of specific regulations which give meaning to the broad objectives and above requirements stated in the Act and provide the regulatory context with which the operator of a scrap metal recycling facility must be familiar. Some of the more common types of regulation at the provincial level address issues such as:

  • air quality
  • approvals/appeals
  • contaminated sites
  • effluent monitoring
  • emergency response
  • environmental assessment
  • export/import of hazardous waste/recyclables
  • land use/land use planning
  • noise prevention/control
  • nuclear substances/radioactive devices
  • recycling
  • scrap metal recovery/recycling
  • soil conservation
  • spill prevention/cleanup
  • substance release
  • transportation
  • waste management *

* Batteries, beverage containers, gasoline and propane gas storage/handling, paint containers, PCBs, solvents, storage tank handling/maintenance, used oil, used tires, wastewater, water quality

TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS

The provincial Transportation of Dangerous Goods Acts apply to the movement of substances or organisms that are deemed "dangerous" by the Governor in Council, wherein dangerous usually means dangerous to life, health, property or the environment. The classification includes explosives; gases in various volatile states; flammable and combustible liquids or solids; oxidizing substances; poisonous, toxic and infectious substances; corrosives; and other miscellaneous dangerous products, substances or organisms. In some provinces the classification explicitly includes radioactive substances; however, it is safe to assume that in provinces where it does not, the reference is implicit in the miscellaneous part of the schedule.

The Act prohibits anyone from handling or disposing, or causing the handling or disposing, of dangerous or hazardous goods unless it is in compliance with the Act and its regulations. Compliance involves, among other things, the holding of a valid permit, taking appropriate precautions in dealing with the dangerous entity, the conscientious reporting to authorities and diligent recording of any accidents or spills, and making remedial efforts to the extent possible in the case of emergencies.

Regulations under the Acts differ in content from province to province. Some formally state the adoption by the province of the federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act. Others extend the classification criteria for dangerous or hazardous substances, or list fees associated with licensing or spill clean-up. Others require the carrying of appropriate manifests and explain how to fill them out. In one case (Manitoba) the acceptable concentrations of contaminants in automobile shredder residue is recorded. A familiarity with the peculiarities of one's provincial Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act or equivalent is recommended.

SPILL REPORTING

These regulations require that a person who has possession, charge or control of a substance to immediately report a spill to the Province's Emergency Program spill line. (Note that municipalities are generally notified as well.) The regulation divides spilled substances by means of their classification under the federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and provides a schedule setting out certain threshold limits for different classifications. Spills equal to or greater than such limits are to be reported.

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Waste Management Acts authorize the provincial Environment Ministers to make guidelines and regulations pertaining to every person and commercial, industrial or public organization that produces, stores, transports, handles, treats, destroys, discharges, or disposes of wastes and special wastes. They generally override municipal by?laws and permits that conflict with it, and wastes discharged or disposed of must have a permit, approval, order, waste management plan, or be in compliance with the regulations. The Acts deal with licensing of disposal facilities as well as the transportation of wastes.

The definition of waste varies from province to province and sometimes from regulation to regulation within a province. In British Columbia, the Waste Management Act (R.S.B.C. 1996, c.482) covers a host of environmental topics in great detail that in other provinces are dealt with in the Environmental Protection Act. The topics include stewardship programs for beverage containers and used oil, contaminated sites remediation, storage of designated materials, and spill reporting. Similarly, in Ontario, the General Waste Management Regulation (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 347) establishes standards for waste disposal sites and waste management systems, deals with transportation of wastes within and without the province, manifests, refrigerants and leachate quality criteria.

WATER QUALITY

The provincial legislation dealing with water is of importance from a variety of standpoints. In the case of Water Acts that stand alone, the focus is generally on the protection of water resources in terms of diversion and of quantity. Agricultural uses tend to figure prominently, but industrial uses of water supply are also addressed.

Some regulations under Water Acts relate to wells and well-digging. There are provisions in the regulations for proper sanitary maintenance of wells. There are often prohibitions in the acts and regulations, as there are at the federal level, against any depositing of contaminating materials or waste discharges into any provincial waters. To do so without a valid licence constitutes an offence.

Other water regulations can be found under the Environmental Protection Act or its equivalent. These regulations are usually more specifically geared at preventing water quality impairment. They tend to govern most aspects of water quality, including sewage, industrial wastewater treatment and effluents in some detail. Both types of water legislation should be consulted however.

Note: In British Columbia, the Fish Protection Act is included in the list of the Appendix because it contains a provision against pollution of fish-inhabited streams. The situation is analogous to the inclusion of the Fisheries Act at the federal level.

AIR QUALITY

There are many regulations dealing with air quality. They deal with polluting emissions from all kinds of industrial contaminant sources, from incinerators to secondary lead smelters, to the "construction, alteration, demolition, drilling, blasting, crushing or screening of anything so that a contaminant is carried beyond the limits of the property on which the construction, alteration, demolition, drilling, blasting, crushing or screening is being carried out" (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 337).

The regulations often cite allowable concentrations for a variety of airborne contaminant chemicals. The most common air pollutants cited are carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide ground level ozone, and suspended particulates. Controls on air emissions also include thresholds for contaminants such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and lead. Sometimes they will offer specific methods for testing the opacity of stack emissions or making other scientific determinations of air quality. The opacity of emissions tests may be applied to stack emissions of diesel transport trucks also. Permits for emissions and the authority of the minister to place limitations on contaminants for specific operators, as is the case of contaminants in other media, also figure in the regulations.

OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES

Ozone-depleting substances Acts and regulations prohibit the release of ozone-depleting substances used in many solvents, refrigerants and sterilants into the atmosphere and aim to avoid harm or injury caused by substances used to replace ozone-depleting substances. They are frequently found in white goods and fire extinguishers among other appliances and devices. The regulations establish conditions under which devices containing ozone-depleting substances may be used, with the objective of gradually eliminating the use of all such substances. It is an offence to release an ozone-depleting substance into the environment.

Ozone-depleting substance regulations are usually found under the Environmental Protection Act of a given province, although in the case of Manitoba, there is an Act dedicated to these substances alone. Some regulations may prohibit landfills or dumps from accepting waste that is labeled as having contained an ozone-depleting substance.

CONTAMINATED SITES

The Contaminated Sites Acts and their regulations are intended to provide a system for the improved environmental quality, or remediation, of sites that are contaminated. Contaminated, in reference to a site, means degraded by the presence of a product, substance or organism that is foreign or exceeds the natural constituents of the environment at the site and has the potential to harm the natural, physical, chemical or biological quality of the environment or pose a threat to the health or safety of a person.

Where restoration is impracticable, the aim is simply to mitigate the risks that the contaminated site poses to human health or the environment. The Acts and regulations are consistent with the principles of sustainable development and encourage stewardship. The "polluter pays" principle may apply.

CANADA-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS (CWS)

Under the Canada-Wide Environmental Standards Sub-Agreement, the federal, provincial and territorial Environment Ministers (except for Quebec) have agreed to work together to develop appropriate Canada-wide standards for environmental contaminants or issues of national concern. Provinces have been involved through the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) in the development and implementation of Canada-wide Standards for a selected group of pollutants including: particulate matter, ozone, mercury (emissions from base-metal smelters and incinerators), dioxins and furans (incinerators, electric arc furnaces, iron sintering), petroleum hydrocarbons in soil, and benzene. Information on the Canada-wide Standards is also available on the CCME web site at www.ccme.ca.

MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS

The sheer number of municipalities in which CARI members operate prohibits a detailed review of requirements at that level. However, all owners and managers of scrap metal recycling facilities must be cognizant of what municipal permits may be required to facilitate their operations and what type of constraints municipal by-laws may place on their activities. Some of the controls placed on scrap metal recycling facilities at the municipal level include:

Sewer Use These by?laws control industrial wastes and the monitoring of sanitary, storm and combined sewer wastewater. They authorize the issuing of waste discharge permits as well as inspection and monitoring of discharges. Smaller municipalities and rural areas may use provincial standards, which generally concur with municipal by-law limits.

Noise Noise by?laws apply to noise levels generated by industrial plants and equipment. Maximum level limits are set for site perimeter noise readings. Provincial Guidelines are used in those instances where municipal by-laws do not exist.

Air Pollution Municipal controls on air emissions are not common. Where they do exist, they may require permits for the installation and operation of works that produce air pollution and establish emission criteria for opacity and air contaminant concentrations for fine particulates, sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and trace metals. Air pollution control by?laws may also require access for testing and include offences and penalties for non-compliance.

Lists of Relevant Legislation

FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL ACTS AND REGULATIONS

CANADA WATER ACT (R.S.C. 1985, c. C-11)

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ACT (S.C. 1992, c. 37)
· Comprehensive Study List Regulations (SOR/94-638)
· Exclusion List Regulations (SOR/94-639)
· Inclusion List Regulations (SOR/94-637)

CEPA-CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (1999, c. 33)
· Chlorobiphenyls Regulations (SOR/91-152)
· Enforcement and Compliance Policy
· Environmental Code of Practice for Aboveground Storage Tank Systems Containing Petroleum Products (CCME-EPC-LST-71E)
· Environmental Code of Practice for Underground Storage Tank Systems Containing Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products (CCME-EPC-LST-61E)
· Environmental Code of Practice on Halons (Code of Practice EPS 1/RA/3E)
· Environmental Emergency Regulations (SOR/2003-307)
· Export and Import of Hazardous Wastes Regulations (SOR/92-637)
· Export Control List Notification Regulations (SOR/2000-108)
· Export of Substances Under the Rotterdam Convention Regulations (SOR/2002-317)
· Federal Aboveground Storage Tank Technical Guidelines (P.C. 1996-1233)
· Federal Halocarbon Regulations (SOR-2003-289)
· Federal Underground Storage Tank Technical Guidelines
· Interprovincial Movement of Hazardous Waste Regulations (SOR/2002-301)
· List of Hazardous Waste Authorities (SOR/92-636)
· List of Toxic Substances Authorities (SOR/94-162)
· National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines (CCME-EPC/AITG-49E)
· Non-Domestic Substances List (Canada Gazette, Part I, Supplement, January 31, 1998)
· Notice With Respect to Substances in the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 1999 (Canada Gazette, Part I, February 13, 1999)
· Notice With Respect to Substances in the National Pollutant Release Inventory for 2000 (Canada Gazette, Part I, December. 25, 1999)
· Ozone-Depleting Substances Regulations, 1998 (SOR/99-7)
· Prohibition of Certain Toxic Substances Regulations, 2003 (SOR/2003-99)
· PCB Waste Export Regulations, 1996 (SOR/97-109)
· On-Road Vehicle and Engine Emission Regulations (SOR/2003-2)
· Registration of Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products on Federal Lands Regulations (SOR/97-10)
· Secondary Lead Smelter Release Regulations (SOR/91-155)
· Solvent Degreasing Regulations (SOR/2003-283)
· Storage of PCB Material Regulations (SOR/92-507)
· Vinyl Chloride Release Regulations, 1992 (SOR/92-631)
· Export and Import of Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Recyclable Material Regulations (Proposed, March 20, 2004)

FISHERIES ACT (R.S.C. 1985, c. F-14)

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES WATERS ACT (S.C. 1992, c. 39)

· Northwest Territories Waters Regulations (SOR/93-303)

NUCLEAR SAFETY AND CONTROL ACT (S.C. 1997, c. 9)

· General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations (SOR/2000-202)
· Nuclear Substances and Radiation Devices Regulations (SOR/2000-207)
· Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations (SOR/2000-208)

NUNAVUT WATERS AND NUNAVUT SURFACE RIGHTS TRIBUNAL ACT
(2002, C. 10)

TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS ACT, 1992 (S.C. 1992, c. 34)

· TDG Clear Language Regulations, 2002


PROVINCIAL/TERRITORIAL ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION

ALBERTA

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND ENHANCEMENT ACT (R.S.A. 2000,
c. E-12)
· Activities Designation Regulation (Alta. Reg. 276/2003)
· Administrative Penalty Regulation (Alta. Reg. 23/2003)
· Alberta Ambient Air Quality Guidelines
· Alberta Ambient Surface Water Quality Interim Guidelines
· Alberta Stack Sampling Code
· Approvals and Registrations Procedure Regulation (Alta. Reg. 113/1993)
· Beverage Container Recycling Regulation (Alta. Reg. 101/1997)
· Code of Practice for Foundries
· Code of Practice for Landfills
· Conservation Easement Registration Regulation (Alta. Reg. 215/1996)
· Conservation and Reclamation Regulation (Alta. Reg. 115/93)
· Disclosure of Information Regulation (Alta. Reg. 116/93)
· Environmental Protection and Enhancement (Miscellaneous) Regulation (Alta. Reg. 118/93)
· Guide to Content of Industrial Approval Applications
· Guidelines for Industrial Landfills
· Lubricating Oil Material Environmental Handling Charge By-Law (Alta. Reg. 228/2002)
· Lubricating Oil Material Recycling and Management By-Law (Alta. Reg. 227/2002)
· Lubricating Oil Material Recycling and Management Regulation (Alta. Reg. 82/97)
· Ozone-Depleting Substances and Halocarbons Regulation (Alta. Reg. 181/2000)
· Potable Water Regulation (Alta. Reg. 277/2003)
· Release Reporting Guidelines
· Release Reporting Regulation (Alta. Reg. 117/93)
· Substance Release Regulation (Alta. Reg. 124/93)
· Surface Water Quality Guidelines for Use in Alberta
· Tire Recycling and Management Regulation (Alta. Reg. 206/96)
· Waste Control Regulations (Alta. Reg.192/96)
· Wastewater and Storm Drainage (Ministerial) Regulation (Alta. Reg. 120/93)
· Wastewater and Storm Drainage Regulation (Alta. Reg. 119/93)
· Water Quality Based Effluent Limits Procedures Manual

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION AND HANDLING ACT (R.S.A. 2000,
c. D-4)

· Dangerous Goods Transportation and Handling Regulation (Alta. Reg. 157/97)

SOIL CONSERVATION ACT (R.S.A. 2000, c. S-15)

· Soil Conservation Notice Regulation (Alta. Reg. 272/98)

WATER ACT (R.S.A. 2000, c. W-3)

· Water (Ministerial) Regulation (Alta. Reg. 205/98)
· Water (Offences and Penalties) Regulation (Alta. Reg. 193/98)

BRITISH COLUMBIA

ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT ACT (R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 118)

· Environmental Appeal Board Procedure Regulation (B.C. Reg. 1/82)
· Environmental Data Quality Assurance Regulation (B.C. Reg. 301/90)
· Environmental Impact Assessment Regulation (B.C. Reg. 330/81)
· Air Monitoring Guidelines: Volume I Particulate Non-Continuous
· Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Dissolved Oxygen
· British Columbia Water Quality Index
· Guidelines For Industry Emergency Response Contingency Plans
· Persistent Toxic Substance Definition
· Source Testing Code for the Visual Measurement of the Opacity of Emissions From Stationary Sources
· Stationary Emission Testing Code
· Summary of Environmental Standards and Guidelines for Fuel Handling, Transportation and Storage

FISH PROTECTION ACT [SBC 1997] CHAPTER 21

· Sensitive Streams Designation and Licensing Regulation (B.C. Reg. 89/2000)
· Streamside Protection Regulation (B.C. Reg. 10/2001)

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS ACT (R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 458)

· Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulation (B.C. Reg. 203/85)

WASTE MANAGEMENT ACT (R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 482)

· Beverage Container Stewardship Program Regulation (B.C. Reg. 406/97)
· Contaminated Sites Regulation (B.C. Reg. 375/96)
· Ozone Depleting Substances and Other Halocarbons Regulation (B.C. Reg. 387/99)
· Ozone Depleting Substances Regulation Compliance Guide
· Pollution Control Objectives for Municipal Type Waste Discharges in British Columbia
· Pollution Control Objectives for the Mining, Smelting, and Related Industries of British Columbia
· Post-Consumer Residual Stewardship Program Regulation (B.C. Reg. 111/97)
· Public Notification Regulation (B.C. Reg. 202/94)
· Return of Used Lubricating Oil Regulation (B.C. Reg. 64/92)
· Storage of Recyclable Material Regulation (B.C. Reg. 133/92)
· Special Waste Regulation (B.C. Reg. 63/88)
· Spill Cost Recovery Regulation (B.C. Reg. 250/98)
· Spill Reporting Regulation (B.C. Reg. 263/90)
· Waste Management Permit Fees Regulation (B.C. Reg. 299/92)

WATER ACT (R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 483)

· Water Regulation (B.C. Reg. 204/88)

SASKATCHEWAN

CLEAN AIR ACT (S.S. 1986-87-88, c. C-12.1)

· Clean Air Regulations (R.S.S., c. C-12.1, r.1)

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.S. 1984-85-86, c. D-1.2)

· Dangerous Goods Transportation Regulations (R.R.S., C. D-1.2, r. 1)

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION ACT (R.S.S. 1983-84,
c. E-10.2)

· Scrap Tire Management Regulations (R.R.S., c. E-10.2, r. 9)
· Used Oil Collection Regulations (R.R.S., c. E-10.2, r. 8)
· Environmental Spill Control Regulations (R.R.S., c. D-14, r. 1)
· Hazardous Substances and Waste Dangerous Goods Regulations (R.R.S., c. E-10.2,
r. 3)
· PCB Waste Storage Regulations (R.R.S., c. E-10.2, r. 6)
· Water Regulations, 2002 (R.R.S., c. E-10.21, r. 1)

OZONE-DEPLETING SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT, 1993 (R.S.S. 1993, Chapter
O-8.1)

· Ozone-Depleting Substances Control Regulations (R.R.S., c. O-8.1, r. 1)

MANITOBA

CONTAMINATED SITES REMEDIATION ACT (S.M. 1996, c. 40
(C.C.S.M. c. C205))

· Contaminated Sites Remediation Regulation (Man. Reg. 105/97)

DANGEROUS GOODS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.M. 1987, c. D12)

· Environmental Accident Reporting Regulation (Man. Reg. 439/87)
· Classification Criteria for Products, Substances and Organisms Regulation (Man. Reg. 282/87)
· Dangerous Goods Handling and Transportation Fees Regulation (Man. Reg. 164/2001)
· Dangerous Goods Handling and Transportation Regulation (Man. Reg. 55/2003)
· Generator Registration and Carrier Licensing Regulation (Man. Reg. 175/87)
· Manifest Regulation (Man. Reg. 139/88)
· PCB Storage Site Regulation (Man. Reg. 474/88)
· Special Waste (Shredder Residue) Regulation (Man. Reg. 113/2003)
· Storage and Handling of Petroleum Products and Allied Products Regulation (Man. Reg. 188/2001)

ENVIRONMENT ACT (S.M. 1987-88, c. 26 (C.C.S.M. c. E125))

· Classes of Development Regulation (Man. Reg. 164/88)
· Environment Act Fees Regulation (Man. Reg. 168/96)
· Licensing Procedures Regulation (Man. Reg. 163/88)
· Manitoba Surface Water Quality Objectives
· Objectives and Guidelines for Various Air Pollutants
· Onsite Wastewater Management Systems Regulation (Man. Reg. 83/2003)
· Waste Disposal Grounds Regulation (Man. Reg. 150/91)
· Water and Wastewater Facilities Regulation (Man. Reg. 77/2003)

OZONE DEPLETING SUBSTANCES ACT (C.C.S.M. 1990, c. O80)

· Ozone Depleting Substances Regulation (Man. Reg. 103/94)

PUBLIC HEALTH ACT (R.S.M. 1987, c. P210)

· Atmospheric Pollution Regulation (Man. Reg. 320/88 R)
· Collection and Disposal of Wastes Regulation (Man. Reg. 321/88 R)
· Insanitary Conditions Regulations (Man. Reg. 325/88)
· Protection of Water Sources Regulation (Man. Reg. 326/88)
· Sanitary Areas Regulation (Man. Reg. 328/88)
· Water Supplies Regulation (Man. Reg. 330/88 R)
· Water Works, Sewerage and Sewage Disposal Regulation (Man. Reg. 331/88 R)

WASTE REDUCTION AND PREVENTION (WRAP) ACT (S.M. 1989-90, c. 60)

· Multi-Material Stewardship (Interim Measures) Regulation (Man. Reg. 39/95)
· Tire Stewardship Regulation (Man. Reg. 33/95)
· Used Oil, Oil Filters and Containers Stewardship Regulation (Man. Reg. 86/97)

ONTARIO

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.O. 1990, c. D.1)

· General Regulation (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 261)

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (R.S.O. 1990, c. E.19)

· Air Contaminants From Ferrous Foundries (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 336)
· Airborne Contaminant Discharge Monitoring and Reporting (O. Reg. 127/01)
· Ambient Air Quality Criteria (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 337)
· Annex to Publication LU-131 Noise Assessment Criteria in Land Use Planning (October 1997)
· Application of Approval of a Waste Management System - February 2000
· Approval of Waste Management Systems for Dust Suppression Using a Waste Material (Guideline C-9)
· Approval Responsibilities for Waste Disposal (Guideline C-3)
· Atmospheric Emissions from Stationary Combustion Turbines (Guideline A-5)
· Baghouse Data Sheet
· Basic Comprehensive Certificates of Approval (Air) - User Guide, Fact Sheet, Application
· Certificate of Approval Exemptions - Air (O. Reg. 524/98)
· Classification and Exemption of Spills (O. Reg. 675/98)
· Combustion Equipment Data Sheet
· Compatibility Between Industrial Facilities and Sensitive Land Uses (D-6)
· Containers (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 340)
· Cyclone Data Sheet
· Deriving Receiving Water Based, Point-Source Effluent Requirements for Ontario Waters (Procedure B1-5)
· Determination of Contaminant Limits and Attenuation Zones (Procedure B7-1)
· Determination of Thermal Processes Allowed Under Regulation 555/92 Incineration Ban (Guideline A-6)
· Drinking Water Quality (Guideline B-5)
· Economic Analyses of Control Documents on Private Sector Enterprises and Municipal Projects (GUIDELINE F-14)
· Effluent Monitoring and Effluent Limits -- Iron and Steel Manufacturing Sector
(O. Reg. 214/95)
· Effluent Monitoring and Effluent Limits -- Metal Casting Sector (O. Reg. 562/94)
· Engineered Facilities at Landfills That Receive Municipal and/or Non-Hazardous Waste (Procedure C13-1)
· Engineered Facilities at Landfills That Receive Municipal and/or Non-Hazardous Wastes (Guideline C-13)
· Environmental Assessment (EA) Glossary (Guideline E-5)
· Environmental Assessment (EA) Planning and Approvals (Guideline E-3)
· Environmental Security Account (Guideline G-3)
· General -- Air Pollution (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 346)
· General -- Waste Management (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 347)
· Guide to Waste Audits and Reduction Workplans for Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Sectors
· Guide for Applying for Approval of Waste Disposal Sites - November 1999
· Guidelines for Evaluating Construction Activities Impacting on Water Resources (Guideline B-6)
· Guideline for the Installation and Operation of Continuous Emission Monitoring (Cem) Systems and Their Use for Reporting
· Guideline on Public Access to Reports From External Parties (Guideline H-3)
· Guidelines for Submissions Under Section 17 of the Environmental Protection Act
· Guideline for Use at Contaminated Sites in Ontario (Guideline C-15)
· Handling and Disposal of Selected Wastes from Retail Motor Vehicle Servicing Facilities (Guideline C-11)
· Hazardous Waste Categorization and Review (Guideline C-16)
· Incorporation of the Reasonable Use Concept into MOEE Groundwater Management Activities (Guideline B-7)
· Individual On-Site Sewage Systems: Water Quality Impact Risk Assessment (Procedure D5-4)
· Information to be Submitted for Approval of Stationary Sources of Sound (Publication NPC-233)
· Interim Expansion of Municipal Landfills (Guideline E-4)
· Interim Procedures for Environmental Assessment Planning and Approvals (Procedure E1-1)
· Landfilling Sites (O. Reg. 232/98)
· Land Use Compatibility (Guideline D-1)
· Land Use Compatibility: Definitions (Procedure D1-3)
· Land Use Compatibility: Implementation (Procedure D1-1)
· Land Use Compatibility: Specific Applications (Procedure D1-2)
· Land Use On or Near Landfills and Dumps (Guideline D-4)
· Motor Vehicles (O. Reg. 361/98)
· Noise Assessment Criteria in Land Use Planning (Publication LU-131)
· Noise Assessment Criteria in Land Use Planning: Requirements, Procedures and Implementation (October 1997)
· Opacity Test Diesel Fuelled Heavy Vehicles
· Operation of the API, AQI, and Air Quality Advisory (Guideline A-3)
· Pollution Prevention Planning - Guidance Document and Workbook
· Procedures for Handling and Disposal of Selected Wastes From Retail Motor Vehicle Servicing Facilities (Procedure C11-1)
· Prohibition of Waste Oil for Use as a Dust Suppressant (Guideline C-14)
· Recycling And Composting Of Municipal Waste (O. Reg. 101/94)
· Refrigerants (O. Reg. 189/94)
· Registration on Title of Certificates of Approval for Waste Disposal Sites (Guideline C-5)
· Resolution of Groundwater Interference Problems (Guideline B-9)
· Resolution of Groundwater Quality Interference Problems (Procedure B9-1)
· Role of the Ministry in Spills and Emergencies (Guideline G-1)
· Solvents (O. Reg. 717/94)
· Sound Level Limits for Stationary Sources in Class 1 & 2 Areas (Urban) (Publication NPC-205)
· Sound Level Limits for Stationary Sources in Class 3 Areas (Rural) (Publication NPC-232)
· Spills (O. Reg. 360/90)
· Spill Cleanup Options (Procedure G1-1)
· Spills Action Centre Operations (Guideline G-2)
· Step by Step Guideline for Emission Calculation, Record Keeping and Reporting for Airborne Contaminant Discharge (for O. Reg. 127/01)
· Sterilants (O. Reg. 718/94)
· Stormwater Pollution Prevention Handbook
· Training of Drivers of Liquid Industrial or Hazardous Waste Transportation Vehicles (Guideline C-12)
· Transitional Provisions Relating to the Repeal of Part VIII of the Act (O. Reg. 156/98)
· Use of the "Guidance Manual for Landfill Sites Receiving Municipal Waste" (Guideline C-8)
· Waste Audit Summary (O. Reg. 102/94) - Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Establishments
· Waste Disposal Sites and Waste Management Systems Subject to Approval Under the Environmental Assessment Act (O. Reg. 206/97)
· Waste Management - PCBs (R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 362)
· Waste Reduction Workplan Summary (O. Reg. 102/94) - Industrial, Commercial and Institutional Establishments
· Water Management -- Guidelines and Procedures of the Ministry of Environment and Energy (Guideline B-1)
· Water Management - Policies, Guidelines, Provincial Water Quality Objectives of the Ministry of Environment and Energy (Procedure B-1-2)

ONTARIO WATER RESOURCES ACT (R.S.O. 1990, c. O.40)

· Drinking Water Protection (O. Reg. 459/00)
· Transitional Provisions Relating to the Repeal of Part VIII of the Environmental Protection Act (O. Reg. 155/98)


TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND SAFETY ACT, 2000, S.O. 2000, c. 16

· Propane Storage And Handling (O. Reg. 211/01)

WASTE DIVERSION ACT, 2002, S.O. 2002, c. 6

· Used Oil Material (O. Reg. 85/03)
· Used Tires (O. Reg. 84/03)

QUEBEC

ACT RESPECTING THE ESTABLISHMENT AND ENLARGEMENT OF CERTAIN WASTE ELIMINATION SITES (R.S.Q., c. E-13.1)

ACT TO PROHIBIT THE ESTABLISHMENT OR ENLARGEMENT OF CERTAIN WASTE ELIMINATION SITES (R.S.Q. I-14.1)

BEST PRACTICES GUIDE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF END-OF-LIFE VEHICLES (September 2001)

ENVIRONMENT QUALITY ACT (R.S.Q., c. Q-2)

· Regulation Respecting Hazardous Materials (O.C. 1310-97).
· Regulation Respecting Ozone-Depleting Substances (O.C. 812-93)
· Regulation Respecting Soil Contamination and Rehabilitation (R.Q. c. Q-2, a.31)
· Regulation Respecting the Quality of the Atmosphere (R.R.Q. 1981, c. Q-2, r. 20)
· Regulation Respecting the Recovery and Reclamation of Discarded Paint Containers and Paints (O.C. 655-2000)
· Regulation Respecting Used Tire Storage (O.C. 29-92)

POLICY FOR THE PROTECTION OF SOILS AND REHABILITATION OF CONTAMINATED SITES

HIGHWAY SAFETY CODE (R.S.Q., c. C-24.2)

· Transportation of Dangerous Substances Regulation (c. C-24.2, r. 4.2)

NEW BRUNSWICK

CLEAN AIR ACT (S.N.B. 1997, c. C-5.2)

· Administrative Penalties Regulation - Clean Air Act (N.B. Reg. 98-41)
· Air Quality Regulation - Clean Air Act (N.B. Reg. 97-133)
· Ozone Depleting Substances Regulation - Clean Air Act (N.B. Reg. 97-132)


CLEAN ENVIRONMENT ACT (R.S.N.B. 1973, c. C-6)

· Appeal Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 84-179)
· Environmental Impact Assessment Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 87-83)
· Petroleum Product Storage and Handling Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 87-97)
· Tire Stewardship Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 96-82)
· Used Oil Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 2002-19)
· Water Quality Regulation - Clean Environment Act (N.B. Reg. 82-126)

CLEAN WATER ACT (A.N.B. 1989, c. C-6.1)

· Potable Water Regulation - Clean Water Act (N.B. Reg. 93-203)

TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS ACT (A.N.B. 1988, c. T-11.01)

· General Regulation - Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act (N.B. Reg. 89-67)

NOVA SCOTIA

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.N.S. 1989, c. 119)

· Dangerous Goods Transportation Regulations (N.S. Reg. 105/2002)

ENVIRONMENT ACT (S.N.S. 1995, c. 1)

· Activities Designation Regulations (N.S. Reg. 47/95)
· Air Quality Regulations (N.S. Reg. 55/95)
· Approvals Procedure Regulations (N.S. Reg. 48/95)
· Dangerous Goods Management Regulations (N.S. Reg. 23/02)
· Emergency Spill Regulations (N.S. Reg. 59/95)
· Environmental Assessment Regulations (N.S. Reg. 44/2003)
· On-Site Sewage Disposal Systems Regulations (N.S. Reg. 129/2001)
· Ozone Layer Protection Regulations (N.S. Reg. 54/95)
· PCB Management Regulations (N.S. Reg. 163/97)
· Petroleum Management Regulations (N.S. Reg. 44/2002)
· Solid Waste-Resource Management Regulations (N.S. Reg. 24/2002)
· Used Oil Regulations (N.S. Reg. 179/96)
· Water and Wastewater Facility Regulations (N.S. Reg. 140/2000)


PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

AUTOMOBILE JUNK YARDS ACT (R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. A-25)

DANGEROUS GOODS (TRANSPORTATION) ACT (R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. D-3)

DANGEROUS GOODS (TRANSPORTATION) ACT REGULATIONS (E.C. 319/85)

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. E-9)

· Air Quality Regulations (E.C. 377/92)
· Fees Regulations (E.C. 417/88)
· Lead-Acid Battery Regulations (E.C. 26/93)
· Litter Control Regulations (E.C. 697/91)
· Ozone Depleting Substances and Replacement Regulations (E.C. 619/94)
· Petroleum Storage Tanks Regulations (E.C. 187/90)
· Used Oil Handling Regulations (E.C. 425/92)
· Waste Resource Management Regulations
· Water Quality Certification Regulations (E.C. 583/95)
· Water Well Regulations (E.C. 188/90)

WATER AND SEWERAGE ACT (R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. W-2)

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.N.L. 1990, c. D-1)

· Dangerous Goods Ticket Offences Regulations (C.N.R. 4/96)
· Dangerous Goods Transportation Regulations (C.N.R. 5/96)

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (SNL 2002, c. E-14.2)

· Air Pollution Control Regulations (CNLR 56/03)
· Environmental Assessment Regulations (CNLR 54/03)
· Ozone Depleting Substance Regulations (CNLR 55/03)
· Storage of PCB Wastes Regulations (CNLR 61/03)
· Storage and Handling of Gasoline and Associated Products Regulations (CNLR 61/03)
· Used Oil Control Regulations (82/02)
· Waste Management Regulations (59/03)
· Waste Material Disposal Areas (C.N.R. 998/96)

WATER RESOURCES ACT (SNL 2002, c. W-4.01)

· Environmental Control Water and Sewage Regulations (CNLR 65/03)


NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. E-7)

· Spill Contingency Planning and Reporting Regulations (R-068-93)
· Guide to the Spill Contingency Planning and Reporting Regulations - 6/02
· Spill Report Form - 2002
· Used Oil and Waste Fuel Management Regulations (R-064-2003)
· Plain Language Guide to the Used Oil and Waste Fuel Management Regulations - 11/03
· Asphalt Paving Industry Emission Regulations - 1990
· Guideline for Agriculture Waste - 5/99
· Guideline for Contaminated Site Remediation - 11/03
· Guideline for Dust Suppression - 2/98
· Guideline for Industrial Waste Discharges - 2/98
· Guideline for Ozone Depleting Substances - 2/98
· Guideline for the General Management of Hazardous Waste - 2/98
· Guideline for Waste Solvents - 9/98
· Guideline for Waste Antifreeze - 9/98
· Guideline for Waste Asbestos - 9/98
· Guideline for Waste Batteries - 9/98
· Guideline for Waste Lead and Lead Paint - 11/01
· Guideline for Waste Paint - 9/98
· Guideline for Waste Solvents - 9/98
· Guideline for Ambient Air Quality - 12/02

WASTE REDUCTION AND RECOVERY ACT (December 2003)

TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS ACT, 1990 (S.N.W.T. 1990, c. 36)

· Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, R-049-2002

NUNAVUT

NUNAVUT ACT (S.C. 1993, c. 28)

Act by which Nunavut was brought into being April 1, 1999 (s.3) with provisions (s.29) and duplicating the ordinances (and related laws) of the Northwest Territories. Sections 29 and 76.05 of the Act were amended to allow the GNWT to pass certain kinds of legislation on Nunavut's behalf. These powers were exercised in packages of "Division Legislation" which received Royal Assent December 9th, 1998 (6th Session of the 13th Legislative Assembly) and March 29th, 1999 (7th Session of the 13th Legislative Assembly).

After April 1, 1999, only legislative amendments made by the Nunavut Legislative Assembly apply to legislation inherited from the N.W.T. Amendments to NWT legislation after April 1, 1999 DO NOT APPLY to Nunavut except where specifically indicated."

The Nunavut Legislative Assembly has not yet amended any of the Northwest Territorial legislation that is cited in this document, and no new environmental laws have been developed since 1999. Please refer to the Northwest Territories section of this Appendix for environmental legislation relevant to scrap metal recycling in Nunavut.

YUKON

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION ACT (R.S.Y. 2002, c. 50)

· General (O.I.C. 1986/118)
· Multiple Collection Regulations (O.I.C. 1995/49)

ENVIRONMENT ACT (R.S.Y. 2002, c. 76)

· Administrative Regulations (O.I.C. 1997/29)
· Air Emissions Regulations (O.I.C. 1998/207)
· Beverage Container Regulations (O.I.C. 1992/136)
· Contaminated Sites Regulations (O.I.C. 2002/171)
· Designated Materials (O.I.C. 2003/184)
· Ozone Depleting Substances and Other Halocarbons Regulation (O.I.C. 2000/127)
· Recycling Fund Regulation (O.I.C. 1992/135)
· Solid Waste Regulations (O.I.C. 2000/11)
· Special Waste Regulations (O.I.C. 1995/47)
· Spills Regulations (O.I.C. 1996/93)
· Storage Tank Regulations (O.I.C. 1996/194)

WATERS ACT (S.Y. 2003, c. 19)

· Water Regulation (O.I.C. 2003/58)