Standards Framework for the NDT Certification Program

The Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) National Non-Destructive Testing Certification Body (NDTCB) is a Canadian federal government program that issues personnel certifications according to the CAN/CGSB-48.9712 standard, which is developed and approved through the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) standards management process. The current applicable version of the CAN/CGSB-48.9712 standard is the 2014 version, CAN/CGSB-48.9712-2014, along with the associated Rules of Implementation.

The NDTCB is solely responsible for, retains authority for, and does not delegate its decisions relating to certification, including the granting, maintaining, recertification, expansion and reduction of scope, suspension, or withdrawal of certifications.

CGSB and ISO

The Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) manages the standards that affect a variety of processes and industries. It develops standards based on the consensus of its representatives. For non-destructive testing (NDT) certification, CGSB manages the CGSB-48.9712 standard together with the specific 48/2 committee that it coordinates. The 48/2 committee is composed of stakeholders representing NDT and associated industries.

The International Standards Organization (ISO) also manages various standards across different areas. For NDT certification, it manages the ISO 9712 standard through Technical Committee 135 Sub-Committee 7 (TC-135 SC-7).

Clarifying the Recognition of other Certification Schemes (Equivalency)

The NDTCB’s position is that adopting ISO 9712-2012 as CAN/CGSB-48.9712-2014 / (ISO 9712:2012, IDT) synchronizes the published standards for the certification of NDT personnel, but does not provide full harmonization or mutual recognition of various other certification schemes by default.

The scheme and implementation of the standard must also be harmonized and mutually recognized by the certification bodies involved in order to consider equivalency in the certifications being issued. Mutual recognition is provided once an equivalency is confirmed and accepted by the certification bodies involved, and an agreement is established to define the recognition.

Program information

Payment of fees does not complete or guarantee any candidate’s application and examination process. Each candidate is responsible for ensuring they have met all requisites/requirements prior to examination or final certification. Submitting training, prerequisites or visual acuity results after certification examinations is considered non-compliant, and may result in exam results being voided. Certification status will not be granted until full completion, verification, and NRCan NDTCB approval of application, required fees and requisites. Any misrepresentation or falsification of any of the required documents may result in Code of Conduct violations.

NDTCB understands the importance of impartiality in carrying out its certification activities. Processes are in place to manage any potential conflicts of interest and to ensure the objectivity of all certification activities.

NDTCB makes all reasonable efforts to ensure candidate applications, examination requests and certification submissions are completed as per service standard targets. Despite these efforts, errors, omissions and delays can occur, and NRCan is not responsible for any direct and indirect costs, expenses or delays that may arise.

The transition to a five-year cycle

Our program has been updated to comply with the CAN/CGSB-48.9712-2014 Standard. NDTCB has been transitioning to a five-year period of validity cycle from a three-year period of validity cycle. Here’s what this means for existing or prospective certificate holders:

  • New certifications, subsequent renewals, and re-certifications will be valid for up to five years instead of the previous three.
  • The new period of validity for existing certified personnel will be their birth month up to the fifth year (60 months or less) of certification following renewal.
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