ARCHIVED - 2012-13 Strategic Environmental Assessments, Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy and the Clean Air Agenda Reporting

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  1. Strategic Environmental Assessment Reporting (SEA)
  2. 2012-13 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS)  & Clean Air Agenda (CAA) Reporting

I. Strategic Environmental Assessment Reporting

The Department uses a tri-level process for conducting Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs), which is outlined on NRCan’s SEA website.  Public statements, issued for proposals which required analysis of potential important negative or positive environmental effects through a Detailed SEA, can also be found at the above link.

In 2012-13, NRCan achieved all of its SEA commitments, including:

  • Continuing to implement updated internal SEA policy, processes and guidance material in support of both the 2010 revised guidelines for implementing the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plans and Program Proposals (the Cabinet Directive), and the Department’s Directive on Environmental Assessment, 2011.  NRCan also updated project-level environmental assessment information and related questions within NRCan’s SEA templates to highlight provisions of the new Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012.
  • Providing briefings and training sessions on SEA to over 55 NRCan staff during the fiscal year. 
  • Working with federal counterparts to discuss approaches on best practices for SEA.  For example, participating in a Health Canada-led meeting on respective departmental SEA processes and regulatory proposals.   

In addition, the rate of NRCan compliance with the Cabinet Directive and its guidelines was found to be fully met (100%).  The rate is based on the number of applicable NRCan-led proposals (Budget, Memoranda to Cabinet, Treasury Board Submission and Regulatory Packages) which were subject to NRCan’s SEA process, divided by the number of such proposals. 

The impacts of proposals on FSDS themes, goals and targets were taken into consideration at each level of the SEA process.  In 2012-13, for proposals subject to NRCan's SEA process, 62% had no impacts or were not applicable to the FSDS, while the remaining 38% directly or indirectly contributed to one or more of the FSDS Themes.  Within SEAs, FSDS Goals and Targets cited most often were: Theme I, Goal 1 "Climate Change", Target 1.1 "Climate Change Mitigation"; Theme III, Goal 6, "Ecosystem Habitat Conservation" and Theme IV, Goal 8, "Green Government Operations".  

II. 2012-13 DSDS & CAA Reporting

SP 1.1.2 - Forest Products Market Access and Development

SP 1.2.2 - Forest Product Innovation

SP 1.3.5 - New Energy Supply

SP 2.1.1 - Renewable Energy Deployment

SP 2.1.2 - Support for Clean Energy Decision-making

SP 2.1.3 - Alternative Transportation Fuels

SP 2.1.4 - Energy Efficiency

SP 2.2.1 - Materials for Energy

SP 2.2.2 - Green Mining

SP 2.2.3 - Clean Energy Science and Technology

SP 2.3.1 - Forest Ecosystem Science and Application

SP 2.3.2 - Groundwater Geoscience

SP 2.3.3 - Environmental Studies and Assessments

SP 2.3.4 - Radioactive Waste Management

SP 3.1.3 - Forest Disturbances Science and Application

SP 3.1.4 - Climate Change Adaptation

SP 3.2.1 - Essential Geographic Information


Sub-program 1.1.2
Forest Products Market Access and Development

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategies: Clean Energy

1.1.55

Support the development and adoption of clean and renewable energy technologies in the forest sector and the use of wood as a green building material in Canada and abroad. (NRCan)

1.1.58

Negotiate international agreement to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. (REDD). (NRCan)

Results

1.1.55

Through the Expanding Market Opportunities (EMO) program, NRCan continued to increase the use of wood in various construction categories (e.g., residential, commercial, and non-residential) both at home and abroad. For instance, the program directly influenced the choice of wood in 109 non-residential building products in Canada and the United States (US), representing $85 million in sales of wood for the wood products sector. NRCan also helped to foster greater awareness and understanding of wood as a green building material among architects, builders, specifiers, and consumers in offshore and North American markets.

NRCan, through the Investments in Forest Industry Transformation (IFIT) program, is also supporting the production of a new cross-laminated timber product that provides a renewable alternative to more traditional, energy-intensive building materials such as concrete. In addition, the program invested in a new manufacturing facility that will prefabricate a novel wood-based panelized housing system that will be highly energy efficient.

1.1.58

Canada’s positions on an international agreement to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD) were reflected in decisions and conclusions at the Doha climate change conference. This included a draft agreement on guidelines and rules for the monitoring, measurement, and reporting of the results of REDD activities and an agreement on a one-year process to address financing issues.

Canada’s interests were also reflected in the products of the global REDD+ Partnership, including improvements to its voluntary reporting database and the decision to continue the Partnership and update the work plan to 2014. Canada’s financial investments in the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility and Carbon Fund were supported with activities advancing practical applications for performance-based incentives for REDD+.

These achievements contribute to advancing Canada’s international forest sector interests through international negotiations.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations1
CAA Theme: International Actions

Expected program results for 2012-13

Through the International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program, NRCan provides strategic policy advice to Government of Canada decision makers on key global climate change developments and other issues related to NRCan’s mandate. The Department supports the development of climate technology policies and positions that are aligned with Canada’s interests. Through the program, NRCan also advances Canada’s international climate change objectives in a range of high-level climate change-related fora, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM). Canada’s engagement in the CEM facilitates clean technology collaboration with major economies, including the US and China. NRCan will lead Canada's participation in international initiatives on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).

NRCan will also work on forest carbon issues by contributing to international negotiations on greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting and reporting rules for forest carbon, conducting analysis of key forest carbon options that contribute to climate change mitigation, and continuing to develop Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System. This system will provide forest-related information for Canada's 2013 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC. NRCan will also engage with domestic stakeholders on forest carbon management and the role of forests in meeting Canada’s mitigation goals under international agreements.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In 2012-13, through this program, NRCan ensured that departmental and broader Government of Canada interests were represented and advanced in international climate change and clean energy-related fora. For instance, the Department was the Government of Canada lead on international technology negotiations under the UNFCCC and in the US-led CEM, including providing overall strategic advice on CCS. Canada secured a seat on the Advisory Board for the Climate Technology Centre and Network under the UNFCCC’s Technology Mechanism, which ensured that Canadian priorities are represented and reflected in programming outcomes. NRCan also worked to facilitate Canadian engagement in international partnerships that leverage private sector investment in clean energy projects in developing countries.

Also in 2012-13, NRCan conducted research and analysis to support the development of Canadian positions on technology and other climate change issues under the UNFCCC. As well, NRCan generated timely strategic policy advice and expertise on key international issues related to clean energy and climate technology. These program achievements support key outcomes for Canada’s approach to international climate change, including the advancement of Canadian climate change and clean energy objectives.

NRCan produced updated forest-related estimates for inclusion in Canada’s 2013 GHG National Inventory Report. Canada’s positions on forest-related issues were reflected in agreements reached at the Doha climate change conference including a technical agreement on how forest information is to be included in the new Biennial Reporting requirement under the UNFCCC. Also, an assessment of the projected contribution of forests to Canada’s 2020 GHG emission reduction target was prepared for Canada’s Emissions Trends 2012 report. Finally, in cooperation with provincial and territorial representatives on the National Forest Sinks Committee, NRCan initiated a refined and expanded assessment of the potential and cost of forest management strategies to reduce emissions and increase removals. Engagement with these committee stakeholders ensures that information and data are available for the National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System, and that the stakeholders participate in and support assessments of forest management strategies for climate change mitigation.

These achievements contribute to the International Theme outcomes of advancement of Canadian objectives in international negotiations, compliance with reporting obligations, and engagement of key domestic stakeholders.

As a whole, NRCan realized that it had to work collaboratively with key interdepartmental partners to maintain lines of communication and to collaborate and capitalize on respective areas of expertise, such as Environment Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada on forest-related information and projections. In addition, NRCan made efforts to build capacity within the Department. NRCan also learned that program achievements are enhanced through ongoing science-policy dialogue and integration so that scientific understanding can inform the development of negotiating positions, and analysis of mitigation options can encompass biophysical, economic and other considerations.

Financial Performance Information
Sub-program Total CAA Program Planned Spending Program’s Actual Spending
2.1.2 $1,109,000 $1,082,664
1.1.2 $1,684,128 $1,713,666
Total $2,793,128 $2,796,330

Sub-program 1.2.2
Forest Sector Innovation

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Forestry

1.1.55

Support the development and adoption of clean and renewable energy technologies in the forest sector and the use of wood as a green building material in Canada and abroad. (NRCan)

1.1.55.1

Investments in Forest Industry Transformation (IFIT): Enable renewal and transformation in the forest sector by supporting advanced clean energy technologies in the forest sector. (NRCan)

1.1.56

Develop multidisciplinary assessments of the risks associated with the new and emerging bio-technology in the forest sectors and the risks they may have on the environment. (NRCan)

Results

1.1.55

Through the IFIT program, NRCan supports the production of a new cross-laminated timber product that provides a renewable alternative to more traditional, energy-intensive building materials such as concrete, as well as a new manufacturing facility that will prefabricate a novel wood-based panelized housing system that will be highly energy efficient.

1.1.55.1

Since 2010-11, the IFIT program has supported the first commercial implementation of three advanced clean energy technologies in the forest sector. These technologies—advanced hybrid anaerobic digestion, small scale waste-heat cogeneration, and torrefaction—can produce green power or new bio-energy products. Once fully operational, these flagship demonstrations will help to lower the risk of further deployment of these technologies across Canada’s forest sector.

1.1.56

Knowledge developed at NRCan, and transferred to regulatory agencies, related to risks associated with new and emerging bio-technology in the forest sectors furthered the Department’s understanding of i) plants with novel traits and their potential impact on forest ecosystems (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) and ii) novel biotechnologies for use in pest control (Pest Management Regulatory Agency).


Sub-program 1.3.5
New Energy Supply

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Air Agenda

1.1.5

Undertake and deliver scientific research and reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modeling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC, HC, NRCan, TC)

Results

NRCan developed and released new geoscience information on the viability of new energy sources (such as a geothermal energy potential evaluation for northern communities) and helped to encourage industry interest, investment and support to policymakers.

Other deliverables included a study on shale gas in a hydrogeological context, which was recognized in Quebec’s shale gas Strategic Environmental Assessment outputs, the development of a North American Carbon Capture and Storage Atlas, and establishment of proof of concept for a gas hydrate reservoir in the Mallik gas hydrate research wells (Northwest Territories) using conventional oil and gas drilling methods.


Sub-program 2.1.1
Renewable Energy Deployment

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

1.1.26

Supply financial aid and develop capacity to reduce GHGs through the adoption of emission reducing technologies and practices. (NRCan)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 2: Air Pollution
Target 2.1: Air Pollutants

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

2.1.16

ecoACTION programs reduce GHG emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, TC, INAC).

Results

Renewable energy projects supported by the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program and the Wind Power Production Incentive program are expected to generate up to 16.9 TWh of clean electricity production per year, which would displace from 7.0 to 7.7 Megatonnes of carbon dioxide emissions per year.

The development of policy framework options and recommendations for administering renewable energy in the federal offshore through the Marine Renewables Energy Enabling Measures Program (MREEM) program could encourage marine renewable energy development, which would contribute to diversifying Canada’s electricity mix towards cleaner generation.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures
CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Expected program results for 2012-13

For 2012-13, NRCan, through the MREEM program, will produce a report on regulatory approaches to offshore renewable energy management in other countries. 

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In 2012-13, through the MREEM program, NRCan produced a report on regulatory approaches to offshore renewable energy management in other countries. NRCan program developed in-depth knowledge of other countries’ marine renewable energy regulatory regimes and experiences as a result of the research carried out to prepare the report.

Through the development of the report and discussions with other national government officials, MREEM program officers have learned several lessons, including:

  1. Understanding a country’s governance structure is necessary in determining how and why different countries’ governments have regulated similar marine renewable energy issues in different manners;
  2. Numerous governments are employing proactive measures to identify existing ocean users and potential environmental constraints before the project application phase, in order to provide regulatory authorities with greater certainty in the project permitting process; and
  3. The degree to which countries issue bundled or separate permitting approvals for marine renewable energy projects is often determined by the degree of centralized government authority within each country.
Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$812,950

Program's actual spending

$303,562


Sub-program 2.1.2
Support for Clean Energy Decision-making

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

1.1.20

Develop climate change strategies aligned with the United States including working collaboratively through the Canada-US Clean Energy Dialogue to advance clean energy priorities. (EC, NRCan)

Results

Within the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Clean Energy R&D working groups of the Clean Energy Dialogue (CED), NRCan provides support by co-chairing the CCS working group, as well as supporting Environment Canada in delivering the R&D work program. NRCan has organized and participated in several bilateral CCS conferences, meetings, and knowledge-sharing engagements on specific research projects with United States (US) stakeholders, including with the US Department of Energy, as well as events held in Mobile, Alabama, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Regina, Saskatchewan, through the CCS working group of the CED.

Implementation Strategy: International Work on Climate Change

1.1.43

Work with international partners to implement commitments in the Copenhagen Accord such as mitigation targets and actions; short and long-term financing; mechanisms for technology and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation; adaptation actions; and provisions for transparency and accountability of climate change actions. (EC, NRCan)

1.1.48.2

Participate in strategic international climate change negotiations and engagement in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including leadership on key issues. (NRCan)

1.1.49.1

Advance Canadian interests in a range of high-level climate change-related international fora, such as the G8, the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate (MEF), including the MEF initiated Clean Energy Ministerial; and the Asia-Pacific Cooperation. (NRCan)

1.1.53

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Participate in a variety of policy and technical multilateral cooperation fora including the Global Institute, the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, the International Energy Agency and the MEF Clean Energy Ministerial Carbon Capture and Storage Action Group. (NRCan)

Results

NRCan's continued involvement in the Government of Canada's approach to international climate change ensured that Canada's natural resource interests, including energy, were represented in UNFCCC negotiations that led to the Doha Gateway in December 2012. Furthermore, the remaining matters related to the UNFCCC Climate Technology Centre and Network were addressed, which will allow the Centre to begin its operations by the end of 2013. Among other decisions, the Centre decided to establish an Advisory Board, on which Canada secured a seat. Representing Canada in the US-led Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM), NRCan also profiled Canada as a leader in clean energy and worked collaboratively with major economies to advance objectives on clean energy and technology.

NRCan has prepared advice and analysis to support its participation, as the Government of Canada's representative, in international fora and initiatives for collaborating, knowledge sharing, and capacity building related to CCS. These fora included the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, the Carbon Capture, Use and Storage Action Group under the Clean Energy Ministerial, the Global CCS Institute, and the International Energy Agency.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: Clean Energy Policy
CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Expected program results for 2012-13

Through the Clean Energy Policy program, NRCan will provide ongoing analysis, advice, recommendations, and coordination on clean energy and environmental issues in support of policy and program development and decision-making. This includes providing advice to senior management and developing information products (such as briefing material and research and analysis) to ensure that decision-makers have access to timely advice and information. Through the program, NRCan will also remain engaged in domestic carbon capture and storage (CCS) policy activities, such as providing technical expertise and policy advice to Alberta's CCS Regulatory Framework Assessment. Through the development and deployment of fact sheets and other outreach tools (such as assessments, best practices), NRCan will provide fact-based information regarding the oil sands, shale gas and other unconventional energy sources to Canadians, key stakeholders and foreign governments.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Through this program, NRCan provided timely and strategic advice on clean energy to senior management, as well as to other government departments and external policy fora. In consultation with federal colleagues, NRCan prepared substantive advice on topics such as energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, clean energy technology, the US approach to regulating GHG emissions, Canada's approach to and provincial and territorial action on GHG regulation, domestic air quality regulation, and the Species at Risk Act. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was also undertaken to investigate the impacts of clean energy policy and market forces on the energy sector.

Collaboration with Environment Canada (EC) on the approach to a regulatory framework for GHG emissions continued in 2012-13. Following previous work on performance standards for coal-fired electricity generation, NRCan engaged extensively with EC on the development of regulations applicable to another sector of key importance to the Department: oil and gas. This work has focused on technical and economic analysis relating to reducing GHG emissions from oil sands, other upstream oil and gas producers, and refineries. Information gained has been used to advise senior management.

The regulatory development process has pointed to the need to combine departments’ relative expertise, for example through harmonizing various elements of sector modelling activities. As a step to achieve this, NRCan aligned its modelling capacity with EC, and the two departments have taken further steps to coordinate efforts in this regard. Additional work has been undertaken to ensure compatible results from modelling and to account for differences when they are identified.

Also, eleven fact sheets on CCS projects were produced and made available publicly. These fact sheets provide information on specific CCS projects including the partners involved, costs, expected outcomes and the amount of CO2 to be stored. A number of shale gas-related fact sheets were also developed including on seismicity and GHG emissions. Further, NRCan continued to provide analysis and advice to senior management and decision-makers regarding efforts to support the development of CCS in Canada through federal policy, regulations and programs. This included:

  • Tracking and analyzing Canada’s overall progress in advancing CCS projects and research, including progress relative to other countries;
  • Monitoring and analyzing the advancement of specific CCS projects with respect to NRCan’s energy research, development and demonstration programs, including the ecoENERGY Technology Initiative and the Clean Energy Fund;
  • Supporting NRCan’s participation in the Alberta CCS Regulatory Framework Assessment, with the Steering Committee having completed its report in November 2012;
  • Providing analysis on CCS as part of NRCan’s input to EC regarding the development of federal air emissions regulations for coal-fired power generation; and
  • Completing the International Energy Agency GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, with the publication of a Best Practices Manual.

These achievements contribute to an increase in clean energy scientific and technological knowledge and stakeholder awareness of related clean energy production, energy efficient and alternative energy technologies, resources, products, services and practices. This program improves the overall effectiveness of Canada’s clean energy actions in response to climate change, clean air and other environmental challenges.

To be able to respond to time-sensitive requests on clean energy, climate change, and environment issues, NRCan has continued efforts to increase its clean energy policy capacity in 2012-13 through proactive recruitment of senior analysts.

Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$2,327,700

Program's actual spending

$1,859,698

Program Name: International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations2
CAA Theme: International Actions

Expected program results for 2012-13

Through the International Climate Change Participation and Negotiations program, NRCan provides strategic policy advice to Government of Canada decision makers on key global climate change developments and other issues related to NRCan’s mandate. The Department supports the development of climate technology policies and positions that are aligned with Canada’s interests. Through the program, NRCan also advances Canada’s international climate change objectives in a range of high-level climate change-related fora, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM). Canada’s engagement in the CEM facilitates clean technology collaboration with major economies, including the US and China. NRCan will lead Canada's participation in international initiatives on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).

NRCan will also work on forest carbon issues by contributing to international negotiations on greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting and reporting rules for forest carbon, conducting analysis of key forest carbon options that contribute to climate change mitigation, and continuing to develop Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System. This system will provide forest-related information for Canada's 2013 National GHG Inventory Report to the UNFCCC. NRCan will also engage with domestic stakeholders on forest carbon management and the role of forests in meeting Canada’s mitigation goals under international agreements.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In 2012-13, through this program, NRCan ensured that departmental and broader Government of Canada interests were represented and advanced in international climate change and clean energy-related fora. For instance, the Department was the Government of Canada lead on international technology negotiations under the UNFCCC and in the US-led CEM, including providing overall strategic advice on CCS. Canada secured a seat on the Advisory Board for the Climate Technology Centre and Network under the UNFCCC’s Technology Mechanism, which ensured that Canadian priorities are represented and reflected in programming outcomes. NRCan also worked to facilitate Canadian engagement in international partnerships that leverage private sector investment in clean energy projects in developing countries.

Also in 2012-13, NRCan conducted research and analysis to support the development of Canadian positions on technology and other climate change issues under the UNFCCC. As well, NRCan generated timely strategic policy advice and expertise on key international issues related to clean energy and climate technology. These program achievements support key outcomes for Canada’s approach to international climate change, including the advancement of Canadian climate change and clean energy objectives.

NRCan produced updated forest-related estimates for inclusion in Canada’s 2013 GHG National Inventory Report. Canada’s positions on forest-related issues were reflected in agreements reached at the Doha climate change conference including a technical agreement on how forest information is to be included in the new Biennial Reporting requirement under the UNFCCC. Also, an assessment of the projected contribution of forests to Canada’s 2020 GHG emission reduction target was prepared for Canada’s Emissions Trends 2012 report. Finally, in cooperation with provincial and territorial representatives on the National Forest Sinks Committee, NRCan initiated a refined and expanded assessment of the potential and cost of forest management strategies to reduce emissions and increase removals. Engagement with these committee stakeholders ensures that information and data are available for the National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System, and that the stakeholders participate in and support assessments of forest management strategies for climate change mitigation.

These achievements contribute to the International Theme outcomes of advancement of Canadian objectives in international negotiations, compliance with reporting obligations, and engagement of key domestic stakeholders.

As a whole, NRCan realized that it had to work collaboratively with key interdepartmental partners to maintain lines of communication and to collaborate and capitalize on respective areas of expertise, such as Environment Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada on forest-related information and projections. In addition, NRCan made efforts to build capacity within the Department. NRCan also learned that program achievements are enhanced through ongoing science-policy dialogue and integration so that scientific understanding can inform the development of negotiating positions, and analysis of mitigation options can encompass biophysical, economic and other considerations.

Financial Performance Information
Sub-program Total CAA Program Planned Spending Program’s Actual Spending
2.1.2 $1,109,000 $1,082,664
1.1.2 $1,684,128 $1,713,666
Total $2,793,128 $2,796,330

Program Name: Clean Energy Dialogue (CED)
CAA Theme: International Actions

Expected program results for 2012-13

Canada and the US are exploring initiatives that could be included in a CED Action Plan Phase II in the following priority areas: carbon capture and storage, the electricity grid, clean energy R&D and energy efficiency.

The CED Secretariat, housed at Environment Canada, works to advance the overall objectives of the CED. It conducts research and analysis to identify opportunities for collaboration with the US in the research, development and deployment of clean energy technologies and to monitor and analyze relevant initiatives to reduce GHG emissions (domestically, continentally and globally). The CED Secretariat also engages with its US counterpart in the Department of Energy and with key stakeholders to identify ways to facilitate and advance the implementation and delivery of CED projects and initiatives. In 2012-13, it will work with the US to develop the Action Plan ll and will prepare and deliver progress reports on the implementation of CED projects and initiatives. SPI is the coordinating office of the CED for all of NRCan.

In 2012-13, the three CED working groups will implement the initiatives included in the CED Action Plan II. It is anticipated that the R&D and Energy Efficiency working group will facilitate collaboration in the following five priority areas: marine energy, advanced biofuels, transportation, buildings and communities and energy efficiency. NRCan will likely focus on the implementation of projects on marine energy, transportation, buildings and communities and energy efficiency.

In 2012-13, the Carbon Capture and Storage working group is expected to continue to build on the initiatives identified in the first phase of the CED and to collaborate on the use of CO2 as a valuable asset for enhanced oil recovery. It is anticipated that NRCan will focus on the implementation of projects related to technical collaboration on research, development and demonstration, dialogue on carbon capture and storage policies and practices, and sharing of best practices on carbon capture and storage communications and public engagement.

In 2012-13, it is anticipated that the Electricity Grid working group will identify key opportunities and barriers associated with advancing an efficient and clean electricity grid within Canada and the US, and to outline recommended steps for bilateral collaboration and dialogue in the second phase of the CED, including further joint projects. NRCan is expected to focus on setting the scene for the deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies, advancing smart grid technologies, realizing the potential of power storage technologies, and increasing opportunities for trade in clean electricity.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In 2012-13, the CED’s CCS working group achieved the following:

  • Collaboration and knowledge sharing opportunities were identified and initiated between federal researchers in NRCan’s CanmetENERGY laboratory and the US National Energy Technology Laboratory;
  • A knowledge sharing event on measuring, monitoring and verification of geologically stored CO2 was held in Mobile, Alabama, in May 2012, and attended by government (federal, provincial, state), industry, and academic stakeholders from both Canada and the US;
  • The Second Bilateral Canada-US CCS Conference was held in Regina, Saskatchewan, in September 2012, to share information and lessons learned regarding the business case for advancing CCS; and
  • NRCan completed a background report on regulations for recognizing the injection of CO2 underground for enhanced oil recovery as a means for geological storage.

On another front, the Electricity Grid working group achieved the following in 2012-13:

  • Continued to implement the actions identified in the CED Action Plan II, an overview of regulatory frameworks for marine renewable energy projects in a number of European countries. Since the completion of this project, Canada and the US have initiated an offshore renewable energy dialogue, aimed at sharing experiences and best practices in the development and administration of offshore renewable energy regulatory frameworks.
  • The working group commissioned a study on utility best practices for engaging consumers on smart grid-related initiatives. Further work is being done to support the development of standards for the smart grid.
  • In the area of energy storage, the working group co-organized a conference in Fall 2012 to examine the state of play of energy storage technologies and the corresponding barriers facing their deployment. An additional study was initiated late in 2012-13 to examine case studies on a regional or cross-border basis that have facilitated the integration of renewable generation. At this stage, all actions identified by the working group in Action Plan II have been, or are being, implemented.

Also in 2012-13, NRCan supported collaboration with the US on four projects in energy efficiency and alternative transportation fuels under the Clean Energy R&D and Energy Efficiency working group3:

  • Working together to strengthen ENERGY STAR® labelling for equipment and appliances, both countries introduced the Most Efficient designation to recognize the most efficient products in the marketplace. Most Efficient ENERGY STAR® criteria for nine products were adopted in early 2013 and promoted through ENERGY STAR® participants;
  • Supporting the introduction of the US ENERGY STAR® Portfolio Manager Building benchmarking tool into Canada, NRCan received design feedback from approximately 250 stakeholders engaged through awareness sessions;
  • A workshop on natural gas use in the transportation sector was organized during the Canada-US Transportation Technologies and Fuels Forum to discuss challenges, set priorities and investigate possible areas of collaboration, pertaining to three broad subjects: research and development, deployment and codes and standards, and further joint activities; and
  • Five companies that operate in the US and Canada participated in pilots for certification under the new ISO 50001 Standard for Energy Management Systems in industry.
Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$1,148,000

Program's actual spending

$1,066,064


Sub-program 2.1.3
Alternative Transportation Fuels

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

1.1.26

Supply financial aid and develop capacity to reduce GHGs through the adoption of emission-reducing technologies and practices. (NRCan)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 2: Air Pollution
Target 2.1: Air Pollutants

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

2.1.16

ecoACTION programs reduce GHG emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, TC, INAC)

Results

Since the launch of its ecoENERGY for Biofuels program, NRCan has signed agreements with producers that represent a built capacity to produce 1,881 ML per year of renewable alternatives to gasoline (ethanol), and 575 ML per year of renewable alternatives to diesel (biodiesel) against targets of 2000ML per year and 500ML per year respectively.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels
CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Expected program results for 2012-13

The ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels program will support two committees that will work on developing and updating codes and standards for natural gas vehicles. As well, the program will initiate international and domestic formal engagements with alternative fuels stakeholders and will put in place two agreements with natural gas local support networks to bring the right decision-making tools to potential markets. Through these efforts, knowledge and collaboration in the area of alternative transportation fuels will be increased.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In 2012-13, NRCan, through the ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels program, undertook the following activities:

  • Supported three technical committees that are developing codes and standards related to natural gas infrastructure and natural gas vehicles;
  • Supported multiple domestic formal engagements (Natural Gas Roadmap Implementation Committee and its working groups) and one international formal engagement with alternative fuel stakeholders;
  • Facilitated the development and launched the “Go with Natural Gas” Website, a resource for Canadian fleets interested in learning more about natural gas for medium to heavy duty vehicles; and
  • Worked towards establishing three natural gas local support networks that will act as information hubs for natural gas end-users (fleets) and other key stakeholders; these networks are expected to be in place in 2013-14.
Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$574,650

Program's actual spending

$386,763


Sub-program 2.1.4
Energy Efficiency

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Goal 2: Air Pollution
Target 2.1: Air Pollutants

Implementation Strategy: Clean Air Agenda, Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA)

1.1.5, 2.1.2

Undertake and deliver scientific research and reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modeling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC, HC, NRCan, TC)

1.1.13, 2.1.11

Enhance energy-efficiency regulations for consumers and commercial products. (NRCan)

Implementation Strategy: Clean Transportation

1.1.40, 2.1.27

Offer information programs and decision-making tools that help Canadians to purchase, drive and maintain their vehicles in a manner that reduces fuel consumption and GHG emissions. (NRCan)

Results

1.1.5, 2.1.2

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program improves energy efficiency in Canada by making the housing, building and equipment stock more energy-efficient, energy performance more visible, and industry and vehicle operations more efficient, and by 2012-13 its activities resulted in more than 12 PJ of energy savings.

1.1.13, 2.1.11

The Energy Efficiency Regulations establish energy efficiency standards for a wide range of energy-using products, with the objective of eliminating the least energy-efficient products from the Canadian market. Work performed in 2012-13 towards the enhancement of the regulations included the completion of 16 market assessments of consumer and commercial products to be regulated. Nine technology assessments were also undertaken.

1.1.40, 2.1.27

In 2012-13, NRCan made improvements to the information and tools that it has developed on fuel efficient driving. For example, a new Auto$mart curriculum for personal vehicle drivers, with added multimedia components, was launched. The curriculum is now available for adoption by provinces and territories, and driver training schools from all provinces have ordered the new Auto$mart materials. The curricula for highway truck drivers and fleet owners were also updated.

In addition, NRCan released the Fuel Consumption Guide 2013, which provides model-specific estimated fuel consumption information on new light-duty vehicles sold in Canada. The Guide was distributed across Canada, and it is also available on the NRCan website.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: ecoENERGY Efficiency
CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Expected program results for 2012-13

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program focuses on activities that increase knowledge, awareness, and capacity in energy efficiency, including training, publications, partnerships and agreements. For example, the program will support training sessions on energy efficient products and practices for more than 170,000 individuals. As well, knowledge and awareness will be increased through Project Reports that identify energy management opportunities for four facilities in the industrial sector and through the introduction of the Most Efficient ENERGY STAR® program in Canada. The program will also support partnerships and collaborations that develop or deliver energy efficient products, practices or services through approximately 25 partnerships and/or collaborative arrangements. Finally, the program will foster the adoption of energy efficient technologies, products, and practices as 12 regional programs will use NRCan-developed housing standards and systems, and two provinces/territories will adopt the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings or equivalent. Together, these activities will lead to an estimated 11 petajoules of energy savings.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program met its expected results for 2012-13. Activities undertaken through the program increased knowledge, awareness, and capacity in energy efficiency. Many of these achievements involved collaboration, and working with stakeholders such as provinces, territories, utilities, and municipalities allowed for significant leveraging of federal funds. The program’s activities also resulted in energy savings through improved energy efficiency, which saves Canadians and businesses money and contributes to Canada’s long-term greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.  

The program exceeded its targets for individuals trained on energy efficient products and practices, with well over 200,000 individuals trained across the transportation, buildings, housing, and industrial sectors.

In addition, NRCan increased the energy efficiency knowledge and awareness of Canadians and businesses by helping to identify energy saving opportunities at 4 industrial plants and through the introduction of the Most Efficient ENERGY STAR® designation in Canada. The program also supported 31 partnerships or collaborative arrangements with organizations that developed or delivered energy efficient products, practices and services.

Furthermore, the targets for the adoption of energy efficient housing and buildings codes and standards were exceeded. Twenty-six provincial, territorial and utility programs, as well as two non-governmental programs, used NRCan-developed energy-efficient housing standards and systems. Four provinces have adopted or taken significant steps towards adopting the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings or its equivalent, and an additional five provinces and territories began technical analysis of the code in 2012-13.

Finally, the ecoENERGY Efficiency program met its 2012-13 target for energy saved through its activities, and it is on track to meet its 2015-16 target.  By 2012-13, the program saved more than 12 petajoules of energy, equivalent to the energy used by 125,000 households each year (not including transportation requirements).

Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$38,008,216

Program's actual spending

$37,833,447


Sub-program 2.2.1
Materials for Energy

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Transportation

1.1.39

Develop improved materials and processes to achieve more energy-efficient, lower-emission vehicles. (NRCan)

Results

Many R&D projects were initiated in 2012-13 to develop new materials, technologies, and processes for next-generation lightweight vehicles. Some examples include:

  • Work with Dana Canada to develop a process technology that reduces the sensitivity of the battery cooler plate shape to the physical design of the component. Control of the plate shape will directly affect the quality of the battery cooler braze operation, increase production yields, and strengthen the structural integrity of the component; and
  • Two research projects were initiated with US Steel: one focused on high-strength steels to maintain or improve vehicle crashworthiness during lightweighting of the body and chassis structures, and the other focused on electrical steel development for improved efficiency of traction motors for electrically driven vehicles.

Sub-program 2.2.2
Green Mining

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

1.1.22

Continue to work with industry stakeholders to encourage and promote the adoption and adaptation of new technologies such as information and communications technologies, biotechnology and clean energy technology. (IC, NRCan)

Results

Three examples of collaborative work with industry stakeholders can be given:

  • Completed studies to utilize waste material to replace Portland cement in mine backfill, which would reduce GHG emissions;
  • Organized workshops and followed up on barriers to adoption of Green Mining technologies; and
  • Developed bioenergy feedstocks on mining lands, which reduces dependence on fossil fuels, reduces GHGs and provides a secondary land use post mining.
Non-PMF Performance Expectations:
Number of underground hybrid equipment used in Canada
Results

To NRCan’s knowledge, there is still no hybrid equipment used in Canada. Even though the technology is promising, it is at an early stage of development and uptake. A demonstration project in an underground mine was, however, successful and work is ongoing with a manufacturer and Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) to develop an upscale version of the Hybrid Scoop.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 2: Air Pollution
Target 2.1: Air Pollutants

Implementation Strategy: Clean Transportation

2.1.23

Undertake research, development and deployment of new technologies to reduce GHG and other air-pollutant emissions. (NRCan)

Results

Promotion of clean-diesel engine and diesel emission-mitigating technology helps to reduce air-borne emissions from underground and open-pit mining operations.*

* Activities related to mine ventilation management research (Ventilation On Demand, alternative energy vehicles and ore sorting), among others, will reduce energy consumption and the mining industry environmental footprint.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate4
CAA Theme: Adaptation Theme

Expected program results for 2012-13

NRCan, through the Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program, will deliver information and share expertise to improve the ability of decision-makers in Canada’s regions and targeted economic sectors to adapt. NRCan’s Earth Sciences Sector (ESS) will establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation actions. In 2012-13, it will establish a series of working groups that will address topics such as coastal management, economic analysis, and measuring progress on adaptation. NRCan’s Minerals and Metals Sector (MMS) will deliver a report and a technical seminar to improve knowledge on the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and effluent treatment in the North and offer practical adaptation technologies. NRCan’s Canadian Forest Service (CFS) will deliver a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts, will develop an initial adaptation toolkit, and will start reporting results of its tracking system. In 2012-13, CFS will also identify the areas of focus and the methodology for its integrated assessment.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Under this program, ESS created a national Adaptation Platform to provide a mechanism to strengthen collaboration between, and across, the public and private sectors in the identification, analysis and implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, launched in March 2012, consists of a 33‑member plenary body and a series of working groups. In 2012-13, ESS co-hosted two plenary meetings at which Canadian and American initiatives in economics, regional adaptation and science assessment were examined.

Eight of the NRCan-led working groups, consisting of 201 members, were supported by the ESS: Coastal Management, Mining, North, Measuring Progress, Science Assessment, Regional Adaptation Collaborative/Tools Synthesis, Energy, and Economics. These working groups carried out an assessment of the state of play of the adaptation issue in their topic areas and identified priority activities to advance adaptation action. They worked on activities collaboratively via the on-line workspace and through contracted work. One early deliverable was a review of mining industry initiatives to identify opportunities to mainstream adaptation within them. Through this program, ESS also provided contribution funding of $785,000 in 2012-13 for 32 multi-year cost-shared projects that supported working group goals and enhanced a regional exchange of insights and expertise among Platform members.

There can be a significant time lag between the completion of research and capacity building activities and their communication and use in implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, however, cuts across institutional and sectoral boundaries to improve the exchange of information, and expertise. For instance, by involving members from governments, academia and the private sector, the Northern working group helped improve knowledge of the range of adaptation-related activities already underway in the North.

Under this program, MMS conducted key research and analysis to produce a number of reports to improve knowledge of the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and mining practices in the North; these include:

  • A report on Yukon Mine Wastes and Climate Change;
  • An internal report which examined the use of biochar for mine reclamation in the North to better manage mine tailings under a changing climate;
  • A technical report on the conversion of arsenic trioxide into more stable compounds as an alternative to manage arsenic trioxide dust stored at the Giant Mine. The currently proposed strategy for the Giant Mine uses permafrost encapsulation to stabilize waste, which may experience risks to performance under a changing climate; and
  • A technical report contracted to Environment Canada on roles of microbes in metal attenuation and transport in a changing climate.

A summary report is also in progress highlighting key information acquired and other observations made since the commencement of the Mine Waste Management in a Changing Climate project in 2011 as well as ongoing and pending work.

Similarly, a number of lessons were also learned in 2012-13:

  1. There is ample evidence that extreme climatic events have already affected mine waste management in the North; climate change scenarios have to be considered and incorporated in mine planning and an environmental impact assessment has to be conducted for any northern resource development project;
  2. A holistic approach is required to devise adaptive measures to tackle climate change impacts on mine waste management; solely engineering-based schemes or simple modification of technologies developed for the South seldom work well in the North;
  3. Laboratory testing informs what may or may not work in the North; field validation is essential to develop practical solutions; and
  4. Collaboration with external partners, particularly northern agencies and organizations, helps to broaden the scope of research and speed up the achievement of project goals; however, initiating collaboration and coordinating subsequent research efforts can be more challenging than anticipated.

Under this program, CFS developed a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts and has described it in a comprehensive report, which has undergone internal review, and is in the final stages of editing before publication and release.

The initial Adaptation Toolkit and Tracking System are now available internally, composed of a small selection of tools and currently reporting on four indicators. The key policy questions driving the Integrated Assessment have been identified, an annotated table of contents has been developed, and leads have been identified for each of the seven elements/chapters of the assessment.

Overall, these activities have led to increased collaboration on adaptation, an immediate outcome of the Adaptation Theme of the Clean Air Agenda.

Financial Performance Information
Sub-program Total CAA Program Planned Spending Actual Spending
3.1.4 (ESS) $4,035,000 $4,001,000
2.2.2 (MMS) $180,950 $179,760
3.1.3 (CFS) $873,256 $839,202
Total $5,089,206 $5,019,962

Sub-program 2.2.3
Clean Energy Science and Technology

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: Clean Air Agenda

1.1.5

Undertake and deliver scientific research and reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modeling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC, HC, NRCan, TC)

Implementation Strategy: Energy

1.1.26

Supply financial aid and develop capacity to reduce GHGs through the adoption of emission reducing technologies and practices. (NRCan)

1.1.27

Use the Program on Energy Research and Development (PERD) to research and develop energy technologies that will reduce GHG emissions. (NRCan)

1.1.28

Use the Clean Energy Fund (CEF) for transitioning the energy sector by developing and demonstrating new technologies that will reduce GHG emissions. (NRCan)

Implementation Strategy: Clean Transportation

1.1.37

Undertake research, development and deployment of new technologies to reduce GHGs. (NRCan)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 2: Air Pollution
Target 2.1: Air Pollutants

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

2.1.16

ecoACTION programs reduce GHG emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, TC, INAC).

Implementation Strategy: Clean Transportation

2.1.23

Undertake research, development and deployment of new technologies to reduce GHG and other air-pollutant emissions. (NRCan)

Results

In 2012-13, NRCan established projects, partnerships, contracts, agreements and memoranda of understanding with academia, industry and other public sector stakeholders for the advancement and demonstration of clean energy technologies. For example:

  • Through PERD, NRCan funded approximately 280 clean energy R&D projects, including research in the environmental aspects of oil sands, clean electricity and renewables, bioenergy, energy distribution, smart grid and storage, and efficient end use (in the buildings industry and the transportation sectors);
  • Through ecoEII, NRCan undertook 123 R&D and demonstration projects in five strategic priority areas: energy efficiency; clean energy and renewable fuels; bioenergy; electrification of transportation, and unconventional oil and gas;
  • The CEF, continued to progress through 19 announced or committed small and large-scale projects. Two CEF wind projects were in the process of commissioning their turbines in 2012-13. These projects will add 10.8MW of Clean Electricity generation at the Wind Energy Institute's research site in Prince Edward Island and at a First Nation community in Saskatchewan. In addition, more than $253 million was leveraged from proponents and collaborators of two large-scale Carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects (Shell Quest and Enhance Energy's Alberta Carbon Trunk Line) in 2012-13. The construction of both projects is progressing as planned. It is expected that about three megatonnes of CO2 will be captured annually, starting in 2015.
  • The International Energy Agency (IEA) GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project was completed, with publication of a Best Practices Manual.

Other successful RD&D projects and accomplishments include:

  • Shell made its final investment decision on its Quest CCS project. The federal government is investing $120 million through the CEF. The project is currently under construction and will capture and store up to 1.2 million tonnes of CO2 per year from an oil sands upgrade, starting in 2015.
  • Two projects that were supported by the CEF have been identified by KPMG as some of the 100 most innovative and inspiring urban infrastructure projects in the world (Infrastructure 100: World Cities Edition, 2012). The two projects are the University of British Columbia’s Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Facility (Vancouver, British Columbia), which will be the world's first biomass fuelled, heat-and-power generation system operating on a scale suitable for communities; and Harvest Power’s Energy Garden (Richmond, British Columbia) which is Canada’s first high-efficiency system for producing renewable energy from food scraps and yard trimmings.
  • DABO, a software tool developed by CanmetENERGY in Varennes for continuous optimization of building operations, has been licensed to a Canadian software company. Benefits of the tool include significantly decreased overall operating costs (25%) through energy savings while maintaining occupant comfort level.
  • Under PERD, an evaluation of the corrosivity of bitumen-derived and conventional crude oils under pipeline operating conditions was conducted. In collaboration with Lincoln Electric, these results were used to contribute to the standardization of protocols for measurement of strength and toughness of pipe welds. These protocols were prepared and submitted to the American Welding Society (AWS) for inclusion in industry standards. Such protocols provides valuable information on pipeline structural integrity and fracture prevention, thereby minimizing potential ruptures and leakages associated with the delivery of hydrocarbon products as well as contributing to the reduction of GHG and other air emissions from the industry.
  • EcoEII supported research conducted by Environment Canada to characterize the emissions from, and fuel efficiency of, medium duty trucks. Emissions characterization covered oxides of nitrogen, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and greenhouse gases. This information supports Environment Canada with its on-going development of GHG regulations for heavy-duty vehicles. Specifically, the results of this program will be used to support validation of a certification tool; the Greenhouse Gas Emission Model.
  • Another highlight was the signature, under the ecoEII, of a contribution agreement with CO2 Solutions Inc. The company will be developing an enzyme-based approach for low-cost carbon dioxide capture from industrial effluent emissions in the Alberta oil sands and elsewhere. CO2 Solutions and its partners will optimize and validate the technology at large bench and pilot scale facilities with a view to capturing 90% of CO2 from oil sands in situ production and upgrading operations. This is expected to result in cost savings of at least 25% compared to conventional carbon capture technology.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative
CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Expected program results for 2012-13

The ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative’s program increases clean energy knowledge and stakeholder awareness through the funding of research and projects that support academia, industry and the public sector in producing and using energy in a more clean and efficient way. Activities funded will be in five strategic priority areas: energy efficiency; clean electricity and renewable fuels; bioenergy; electrification of transportation; and unconventional oil and gas. In 2012-13, funding for ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative projects will be approved for government, academic and private sector research and development projects and for demonstration projects with external public and private stakeholders.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

The ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (ecoEII) program initiated 123 projects in 2012-13.

Sixteen demonstration projects were initiated through signed contribution agreements with external recipients in an effort to integrate clean and renewable technologies into the grid and the building environment. The projects selected are in five technical sub-sectors: (i) marine & hydro energy, (ii) buildings & communities; (iii) bioenergy; (iv) smart grid; and (v) wind energy, energy storage and geothermal energy.

The remaining 107 R&D projects are being carried out in 5 strategic priority areas (energy efficiency, clean electricity and renewable fuels, bioenergy, electrification of transportation, and unconventional oil and gas). 36 of the R&D projects are being carried out by external recipients and 71 are being conducted by federal researchers at NRCan, the National Research Council, Environment Canada, and other departments.

Several additional R&D projects that were initiated in 2011-12 continued through 2012-13. They include R&D work on critical minerals being conducted by NRCan’s Minerals & Metals Sector, as well as the Generation IV Nuclear University Research & Development work being managed through the National Science & Engineering Research Council.

Through the ecoEII program, in accordance with government-wide efforts regarding service management excellence, NRCan has published and started tracking service standards for selected services provided to external clients, including the timeframe to negotiate contribution agreements and answer response times to various requests for program-related information. Data collection is still in its infancy but preliminary results indicate that the service standards can be met and are appropriate.

Financial Performance Information

Total CAA Program Planned Spending

$63,868,500

Program's actual spending

$41,603,582


Sub-program 2.3.1
Forest Ecosystems Science and Application

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation

Implementation Strategy: International Work on Climate Change

1.1.48 United Nations

1.1.48.4

Develop and submit a complete and compliant annual national GHG Inventory Report and Common Reporting Format tables to the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat by April 15, to meet UNFCCC and Kyoto Protocol reporting requirements5.

Results

NRCan provided sound and enhanced forest-related estimates for inclusion in Canada’s annual GHG National Inventory Report published by Environment Canada, as required under the UNFCCC.

Implementation Strategy: Forestry

1.1.54

Support the development and provision of scientific knowledge, modelling, data and tools that inform carbon budgets.

Results

The Department continued to enhance Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System, to allow improved estimation of forest carbon and GHG estimates for use in analysis and reporting. Also, it developed a new and improved version of the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) that includes updates to both model parameters representing updated science and improved code, and improved documentation. Finally, NRCan developed updated information through the National Deforestation Monitoring Program, as deforestation has an impact on carbon budgets.

Theme III: Protecting Nature
Goal 7: Biological Resources
Target 7.3: Sustainable Forest Management

Implementation Strategy: Sustainable Forest Management

7.3.2

Generate and disseminate scientific knowledge related to forest ecosystems

Results

An average of 83.27% of NRCan forest ecosystem publications were cited between 2008 and 2012 overall.  In principle, this scientific work can be used to inform clients and stakeholders on sustainable forest management practices (generating and disseminating scientific knowledge related to forest ecosystems is based on publications that have been peer reviewed).


Sub-program 2.3.2
Groundwater Geoscience

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 3: Water Quality
Target 3.1: Fresh Water Quality

Implementation Strategy: Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes

3.1.9

Manage/deliver Great Lakes results federally-provincially, between the Government of Canada and the Government of Ontario. (EC, NRCan)

Results

A work plan for 2012-2015 was proposed to the International Joint Commission (IJC) and a link was created between NRCan’s Geoscan and the IJC Research Inventory website to enhance information sharing about Great Lakes Research. NRCan provided up-to-date information to a sub-committee of the IJC, the Council of Great Lakes Research Managers (CGLRM), on knowledge gaps and strategic direction for future studies on the Great Lakes; this includes the development of key environmental indicators to monitor the environmental state of the Great Lakes. The list was presented to IJC Commissioners at the bi-annual meeting in April 2013; NRCan was also consulted on the Canada-Ontario agreement for the Great Lakes.

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability
Goal 4: Water Availability
Target 4.1: Water Resource Management and Use

Implementation Strategy: Water Resource Management and Use

4.1.4

Improve the knowledge of water, its nature, extent, availability, sector use and best management practices such as Integrated Watershed Management to Canadians (EC, NRCan)

4.1.5

Provide web and print based information on the science and knowledge of water to Canadians in a comprehensive and timely manner to enable responsible decision. (EC, NRCan)

4.1.9

Continue the development and implementation of Water Availability Indicators. (HC, EC, NRCan)

4.1.10

Complete 15 assessments for Canada’s 30 key regional aquifers and produce a national groundwater inventory to help Canadians better understand and manage underground water resources. (NRCan)

Results

NRCan, through the Groundwater Geoscience Program, has continued the delivery of maps, and assessment and characterization activities relating to seven key interjurisdictional aquifers (namely Nanaimo (BC), Milk River (AB), Spiritwood (Man), Waterloo Moraine (ON), Richelieu-Lake Champlain (QC), Chaudière River (QC) and Saint-Maurice River (QC) aquifers). This information informs our understanding on water, its nature, extent, availability and use, to identify best practices.

Key deliverables achieved in 2012-13 were released and shared in a comprehensive and timely manner, including: field characterization studies, data analyses, and interpretation and production of maps and reports; government reports submitted to provincial partners for revision; publication of two open file geophysical datasets, and three peer-reviewed papers.

Moreover, NRCan contributed to the development of key environmental indicators to monitor the environmental state of the Great Lakes. Indicators relevant to water availability and other characteristics continue to be discussed in the broader context with other GOC partners.

Finally, the department has completed 19 assessments of Canada’s 30 key regional aquifers and has produced a national groundwater inventory that continues to be improved in order to help support the sustainable management of Canada's groundwater resources and environmental responsibility; particularly given the importance of groundwater as a primary source of drinking water and the increasing stressors to groundwater from resource development and a changing climate.


Sub-program 2.3.3
Environmental Studies and Assessment

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme III: Protecting Nature
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection
Target 6.2: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat

Implementation Strategy: Park Protected Habitat

6.1.13

Establish one new national park by March 2013; complete feasibility assessments of five other potential national parks and one proposed expansion. (PC, NRCan)

Results

The Naats'ihch'oh National Park Reserve was created in August 2012, covering 4,850 square kilometres, as a result of the expertise, information and data delivered by NRCan to Parks Canada and other government departments. NRCan continues to provide expertise for feasibility assessment requirements in order to deliver a clear understanding of mineral and energy resource potential and inform decision-making for the establishment of national parks that upholds a balance of environmental protection and resource development opportunity. The Department also continues to support Parks Canada on these initiatives, including the release of the Mineral and Energy Resource Assessment on Lancaster Sound in 2013-14.

Theme III: Protecting Nature
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection
Target 6.3: Marine Ecosystems

Implementation Strategies: Marine Ecosystems

6.3.1

Develop a federal-provincial-territorial network of Marine-Protected Areas. (DFO, NRCan)

6.3.5

Provide advice to decision-makers on potential environmental impacts and ecological risks with specific, high-priority ocean activity. (DFO, EC, NRCan)

6.3.8

Complete feasibility assessments for two potential national marine conservation areas. (PC, NRCan)

Results

NRCan supports the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), which has the lead on the development of a federal-provincial-territorial network of Marine-Protected Areas, by providing advice and guidance on the resource development potential within the areas requested by DFO.


Sub-program 2.3.4
Radioactive waste management

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability|
Goal 3: Water Quality
Target 3.1: Fresh Water Quality

Implementation Strategy - Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes

3.1.5

Advance clean-up of historic radioactive wastes in the Port Hope area, which has been identified as an Area of Concern by the International Joint Commission. (NRCan)

Results

The Port Hope Area Initiative enabling activities are underway. Access roads to the two new long-term waste management facilities have been built and construction of the two new waste water treatment plants has commenced.


Sub-program 3.1.3
Forest Disturbances Science and Application

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme III: Protecting Nature
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection
Target 6.4: Managing Threats to Ecosystems

Implementation Strategy: Alien Invasive Species

6.4.1

Fulfill federal responsibilities related to prevention, detection, rapid response and management of invasive alien species. Key activities are related to governance (including international cooperation legislation/regulation, science and technology, risk analysis, information management and sharing, performance promotion, management and mitigation).

Results

NRCan helped fulfill federal responsibilities related to invasive alien species through a variety of activities in 2012-13. Some highlights include:

  • NRCan completed a risk assessment of the invasive Phytophthora ramorum (SODS) to Canadian larch in collaboration with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), and a comparative genomic analysis of Phytophthora ramorum. NRCan also engaged in collaborative research work between Canadian Forest Service (CFS) Pacific Forestry Centre, Washington State University and the US Forest Service to develop an integrated eradication program for Phytophthora ramorum in southwest Oregon and northern California.
  • NRCan contributed knowledge and expertise to an analysis of emerald ash borer (EAB)'s risk of spread to Manitoba and northern Ontario under the aegis of the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers. This project, involving multiple jurisdictions, resulted in examples of prevention efforts and early actions applicable to any un-infested area in Canada. NRCan also conducted public and government workshops in Montreal, Oakville, Ottawa and Winnipeg to inform and update stakeholders on the status of EAB, and developed a lure to better detect EAB.
  • NRCan addressed market access and non-compliance issues in wood trade by developing molecular detection methods that can differentiate between living and dead pinewood nematode.
  • NRCan finalized its work in Toronto that contributed knowledge and tools to eradicate the Asian Longhorned beetle.
  • NRCan served as the Canadian science authority with CFIA in two tri-lateral meetings involving Canada-US-Japan and Canada-US-Korea to evaluate offshore mitigation measures to reduce the threat of introducing Asian gypsy moth in North American ports. NRCan also participated in a Canada-US science panel convened by the CFIA to evaluate science base for the Asian Gypsy Moth Risk Mitigation Program.
  • NRCan staff represented Canada on international scientific working groups, developing regulations to reduce the threat of invasive pest introductions and market access challenges due to domestic pests. Examples include standards on the use of microwave and radio frequency wood treatments, the importation of certain wood and bamboo commodities, and the trade of Christmas trees.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate6
CAA Theme: Adaptation Theme

Expected program results for 2012-13

NRCan, through the Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program, will deliver information and share expertise to improve the ability of decision-makers in Canada’s regions and targeted economic sectors to adapt. NRCan’s Earth Sciences Sector (ESS) will establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation actions. In 2012-13, it will establish a series of working groups that will address topics such as coastal management, economic analysis, and measuring progress on adaptation. NRCan’s Minerals and Metals Sector (MMS) will deliver a report and a technical seminar to improve knowledge on the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and effluent treatment in the North and offer practical adaptation technologies. NRCan’s Canadian Forest Service (CFS) will deliver a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts, will develop an initial adaptation toolkit, and will start reporting results of its tracking system. In 2012-13, CFS will also identify the areas of focus and the methodology for its integrated assessment.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Under this program, ESS created a national Adaptation Platform to provide a mechanism to strengthen collaboration between, and across, the public and private sectors in the identification, analysis and implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, launched in March 2012, consists of a 33‑member plenary body and a series of working groups. In 2012-13, ESS co-hosted two plenary meetings at which Canadian and American initiatives in economics, regional adaptation and science assessment were examined.

Eight of the NRCan-led working groups, consisting of 201 members, were supported by the ESS: Coastal Management, Mining, North, Measuring Progress, Science Assessment, Regional Adaptation Collaborative/Tools Synthesis, Energy, and Economics. These working groups carried out an assessment of the state of play of the adaptation issue in their topic areas and identified priority activities to advance adaptation action. They worked on activities collaboratively via the on-line workspace and through contracted work. One early deliverable was a review of mining industry initiatives to identify opportunities to mainstream adaptation within them. Through this program, ESS also provided contribution funding of $785,000 in 2012-13 for 32 multi-year cost-shared projects that supported working group goals and enhanced a regional exchange of insights and expertise among Platform members.

There can be a significant time lag between the completion of research and capacity building activities and their communication and use in implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, however, cuts across institutional and sectoral boundaries to improve the exchange of information, and expertise. For instance, by involving members from governments, academia and the private sector, the Northern working group helped improve knowledge of the range of adaptation-related activities already underway in the North.

Under this program, MMS conducted key research and analysis to produce a number of reports to improve knowledge of the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and mining practices in the North; these include:

  • A report on Yukon Mine Wastes and Climate Change;
  • An internal report which examined the use of biochar for mine reclamation in the North to better manage mine tailings under a changing climate;
  • A technical report on the conversion of arsenic trioxide into more stable compounds as an alternative to manage arsenic trioxide dust stored at the Giant Mine. The currently proposed strategy for the Giant Mine uses permafrost encapsulation to stabilize waste, which may experience risks to performance under a changing climate; and
  • A technical report contracted to Environment Canada on roles of microbes in metal attenuation and transport in a changing climate.

A summary report is also in progress highlighting key information acquired and other observations made since the commencement of the Mine Waste Management in a Changing Climate project in 2011 as well as ongoing and pending work.

Similarly, a number of lessons were also learned in 2012-13:

  1. There is ample evidence that extreme climatic events have already affected mine waste management in the North; climate change scenarios have to be considered and incorporated in mine planning and an environmental impact assessment has to be conducted for any northern resource development project;
  2. A holistic approach is required to devise adaptive measures to tackle climate change impacts on mine waste management; solely engineering-based schemes or simple modification of technologies developed for the South seldom work well in the North;
  3. Laboratory testing informs what may or may not work in the North; field validation is essential to develop practical solutions; and
  4. Collaboration with external partners, particularly northern agencies and organizations, helps to broaden the scope of research and speed up the achievement of project goals; however, initiating collaboration and coordinating subsequent research efforts can be more challenging than anticipated.

Under this program, CFS developed a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts and has described it in a comprehensive report, which has undergone internal review, and is in the final stages of editing before publication and release.

The initial Adaptation Toolkit and Tracking System are now available internally, composed of a small selection of tools and currently reporting on four indicators. The key policy questions driving the Integrated Assessment have been identified, an annotated table of contents has been developed, and leads have been identified for each of the seven elements/chapters of the assessment.

Overall, these activities have led to increased collaboration on adaptation, an immediate outcome of the Adaptation Theme of the Clean Air Agenda.

Financial Performance Information
Sub-program Total CAA Program Planned Spending Actual Spending
3.1.4 (ESS) $4,035,000 $4,001,000
2.2.2 (MMS) $180,950 $179,760
3.1.3 (CFS) $873,256 $839,202
Total $5,089,206 $5,019,962

Sub-program 3.1.4
Climate Change Adaptation

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change

Implementation Strategy: Clean Air Agenda

1.1.5

Undertake and deliver scientific research and reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modeling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC, HC, NRCan, TC)

Implementation Strategy: Clean Energy

1.1.31

Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and supporting them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by changing climate. (INAC, NRCan)

Implementation Strategy: International Work on Climate Change

1.1.43

Work with international partners to implement commitments in the Copenhagen Accord such as mitigation targets and actions; short and long-term financing; mechanisms for technology and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation; adaptation actions; and provisions for transparency and accountability of climate change actions. (EC, NRCan)

Results

Through this sub-program, NRCan carried out field campaigns (throughout the Arctic and Northern Cordillera) for the purpose of scientific research, which led to the preparation and publication of various papers. 16 journals were prepared and submitted for publication in total, including the publication on High-Resolution Mapping of Wet Terrain within Discontinuous Permafrost using LiDAR Intensity which demonstrated the ability of light detection to provide greater ability to monitor permafrost conditions. NRCan also delivered its accomplishments to northern forums (e.g. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum) and networks of expertise (e.g. Transport Canada-Network of expertise on permafrost), signed an agreement with Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (e.g. BREA (Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment)), and developed methodologies to assess northern infrastructure (e.g. highways, airport) conditions and behaviour.

One specific project is now underway to develop a better understanding of climate-infrastructure-permafrost interaction, which would help decision-makers with short-term maintenance issues and long-term planning of the Iqaluit Airport. Another project is also underway relating to Highway 3 in Yellowknife, to develop a geoscientific approach for terrain-climatic risk mapping to aid in the maintenance and remediation of existing road infrastructure and land-based options to present winter road corridors.

Clean Air Agenda

Program Name: Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate7
CAA Theme: Adaptation Theme

Expected program results for 2012-13

NRCan, through the Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program, will deliver information and share expertise to improve the ability of decision-makers in Canada’s regions and targeted economic sectors to adapt. NRCan’s Earth Sciences Sector (ESS) will establish an Adaptation Platform to bring together knowledge, capacity and financial resources to efficiently and effectively facilitate adaptation actions. In 2012-13, it will establish a series of working groups that will address topics such as coastal management, economic analysis, and measuring progress on adaptation. NRCan’s Minerals and Metals Sector (MMS) will deliver a report and a technical seminar to improve knowledge on the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and effluent treatment in the North and offer practical adaptation technologies. NRCan’s Canadian Forest Service (CFS) will deliver a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts, will develop an initial adaptation toolkit, and will start reporting results of its tracking system. In 2012-13, CFS will also identify the areas of focus and the methodology for its integrated assessment.

Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Under this program, ESS created a national Adaptation Platform to provide a mechanism to strengthen collaboration between, and across, the public and private sectors in the identification, analysis and implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, launched in March 2012, consists of a 33‑member plenary body and a series of working groups. In 2012-13, ESS co-hosted two plenary meetings at which Canadian and American initiatives in economics, regional adaptation and science assessment were examined.

Eight of the NRCan-led working groups, consisting of 201 members, were supported by the ESS: Coastal Management, Mining, North, Measuring Progress, Science Assessment, Regional Adaptation Collaborative/Tools Synthesis, Energy, and Economics. These working groups carried out an assessment of the state of play of the adaptation issue in their topic areas and identified priority activities to advance adaptation action. They worked on activities collaboratively via the on-line workspace and through contracted work. One early deliverable was a review of mining industry initiatives to identify opportunities to mainstream adaptation within them. Through this program, ESS also provided contribution funding of $785,000 in 2012-13 for 32 multi-year cost-shared projects that supported working group goals and enhanced a regional exchange of insights and expertise among Platform members.

There can be a significant time lag between the completion of research and capacity building activities and their communication and use in implementation of adaptation actions. The Adaptation Platform, however, cuts across institutional and sectoral boundaries to improve the exchange of information, and expertise. For instance, by involving members from governments, academia and the private sector, the Northern working group helped improve knowledge of the range of adaptation-related activities already underway in the North.

Under this program, MMS conducted key research and analysis to produce a number of reports to improve knowledge of the impacts of climate change on mine waste management and mining practices in the North; these include:

  • A report on Yukon Mine Wastes and Climate Change;
  • An internal report which examined the use of biochar for mine reclamation in the North to better manage mine tailings under a changing climate;
  • A technical report on the conversion of arsenic trioxide into more stable compounds as an alternative to manage arsenic trioxide dust stored at the Giant Mine. The currently proposed strategy for the Giant Mine uses permafrost encapsulation to stabilize waste, which may experience risks to performance under a changing climate; and
  • A technical report contracted to Environment Canada on roles of microbes in metal attenuation and transport in a changing climate.

A summary report is also in progress highlighting key information acquired and other observations made since the commencement of the Mine Waste Management in a Changing Climate project in 2011 as well as ongoing and pending work.

Similarly, a number of lessons were also learned in 2012-13:

  1. There is ample evidence that extreme climatic events have already affected mine waste management in the North; climate change scenarios have to be considered and incorporated in mine planning and an environmental impact assessment has to be conducted for any northern resource development project;
  2. A holistic approach is required to devise adaptive measures to tackle climate change impacts on mine waste management; solely engineering-based schemes or simple modification of technologies developed for the South seldom work well in the North;
  3. Laboratory testing informs what may or may not work in the North; field validation is essential to develop practical solutions; and
  4. Collaboration with external partners, particularly northern agencies and organizations, helps to broaden the scope of research and speed up the achievement of project goals; however, initiating collaboration and coordinating subsequent research efforts can be more challenging than anticipated.

Under this program, CFS developed a prioritization framework for indicators of climate change impacts and has described it in a comprehensive report, which has undergone internal review, and is in the final stages of editing before publication and release.

The initial Adaptation Toolkit and Tracking System are now available internally, composed of a small selection of tools and currently reporting on four indicators. The key policy questions driving the Integrated Assessment have been identified, an annotated table of contents has been developed, and leads have been identified for each of the seven elements/chapters of the assessment.

Overall, these activities have led to increased collaboration on adaptation, an immediate outcome of the Adaptation Theme of the Clean Air Agenda.

Financial Performance Information
Sub-program Total CAA Program Planned Spending Actual Spending
3.1.4 (ESS) $4,035,000 $4,001,000
2.2.2 (MMS) $180,950 $179,760
3.1.3 (CFS) $873,256 $839,202
Total $5,089,206 $5,019,962

Sub-program 3.2.1
Essential Geographic Information

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change
Target 1.1: Climate Change

Implementation Strategy: Clean Air Agenda

1.1.5

Undertake and deliver scientific research and reporting in support of regulatory and other programs, including data analysis, inventory development, monitoring, modeling and assessment of the effectiveness of efforts as well as research on options, costs and benefits, and technology assessments. (EC, HC, NRCan, TC)

Results

NRCan ensured the availability of up-to-date, accurate and relevant data and information on Canada’s landmass and waters to the public and private sectors for decision-making though the Geobase, Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure and the Geodetic reference system.

Theme III: Protecting Nature
Goal 6: Ecosystem/Habitat Conservation and Protection
Target 6.4: Managing Threats to Ecosystems

Implementation Strategy: Alien Invasive Species

6.4.1

Fulfill federal responsibilities related to prevention, detection, rapid response and management of invasive alien species. Key activities are related to governance (including international cooperation legislation/regulation, science and technology, risk analysis, information management and sharing, performance promotion, management and mitigation). (EC, NRCan)

Results

In 2012-13, NRCan continued to lead the development and implementation of policies such as those related to the Government of Canada’s Open Data, and to ensure geographic data is created with uniform standards and data frameworks to better support environmental monitoring practices and tools.


[1] This CAA program falls under two Sub-programs, 1.1.2 (Forest Products Market Access and Development) and 2.1.2 (Support for Clean Energy Decision-making).

[2] This CAA program falls under two Sub-programs, 1.1.2 (Forest Products Market Access and Development) and 2.1.2 (Support for Clean Energy Decision-making).

[3] In this working group, NRCan leads the Energy Efficiency projects and Environment Canada leads the Clean Energy R&D projects.

[4] This CAA program falls under three Sub-programs, 2.2.2 (Green Mining), 3.1.3 (Forest Disturbances Science and Application), and 3.1.4 (Climate Change Adaption).

[5] On December 15, 2011, the Government of Canada officially notified the UNFCCC that Canada would exercise its legal right to formally withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol.

[6] This CAA program falls under three Sub-programs, 2.2.2 (Green Mining), 3.1.3 (Forest Disturbances Science and Application), and 3.1.4 (Climate Change Adaption).

[7] This CAA program falls under three Sub-programs, 2.2.2 (Green Mining), 3.1.3 (Forest Disturbances Science and Application), and 3.1.4 (Climate Change Adaption).