SmartWay Trends and Statistics

SmartWay’s Trends and Statistics regularly provides information and indicators on the freight sector and the current and past performance metrics of the SmartWay program.  All information presented is based on annual aggregated data provided by SmartWay program participants.

Graph 1

Percentage of empty kilometres has been reduced from 2011 to 2015 as capacity utilization increases among SmartWay Truck Partners

Percentage of empty kilometres has been reduced from 2011 to 2015 as capacity utilization increases among SmartWay Truck Partners

This graph shows the percentage of empty kilometres and capacity utilization for SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers. SmartWay truck carriers have increased their trailer capacity utilization which has led to a decrease in their percentage of empty kilometres. We expect this trend to continue as trucking companies strive to optimize their performance and reduce their time spent with empty trailers.

Year Capacity utilization (%) Empty Kilometres (%)
2011 84.7 16.5
2012 86.2 16.5
2013 86.5 16.2
2014 87.1 15.8
2015 87.3 15.7
 
Graph 2

Total fuel use of Class 8b trucks has declined from 2011 to 2015 for SmartWay Truck Partners

Total fuel use of Class 8b trucks has declined from 2011 to 2015 for SmartWay Truck Partners

This graph shows the average total fuel consumption in litres for all SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers. SmartWay truck carriers have significantly reduced their fuel consumption over the five years shown in this graph, with a significant decrease in the year 2015. The overall drop in fuel consumption is 9.7% over the five years which amounts to savings of 1,058,031 L of fuel per year. We expect this trend to continue as trucks are getting newer and more fuel efficient.

Year Total Fuel Use (L)
2011 10,887,553 L
2012 10,850,304 L
2013 10,913,454 L
2014 10,665,725 L
2015 9,829,522 L
 
Graph 3

Total fuel use of Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners has declined in all provinces from 2011 to 2015 for Class 8b diesel trucks

Total fuel use of Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners has declined in all provinces from 2011 to 2015 for Class 8b diesel trucks

This graph shows the average total fuel consumption in litres for SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers in each Canadian province. The variations for each province can be attributed to geography, climate and operational differences. Given those variations, it is difficult to accurately compare, but trends show that the fuel consumption for SmartWay class 8b truck carriers has been reduced since 2011.

Province Total Fuel Use (L)
2011 2015
British Columbia 3,477,789 L 2,161,182 L
Alberta 3,583,156 L 2,616,373 L
Saskatchewan/Manitoba 6,662,193 L 6,367,258 L
Ontario 5,868,150 L 5,102,937 L
Quebec 4,818,525 L 4,198,944 L
Atlantic 8,188,231 L 7,969,423 L
 
Graph 4

Capacity Utilization Percentage in Class 8b diesel trucks has increased from 2011 to 2015 in most provinces for Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners

Capacity Utilization Percentage in Class 8b diesel trucks has increased from 2011 to 2015 in most provinces for Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners

This graph shows the capacity utilization percentage for SmartWay Class 8b diesel trucks in each Canadian province. The capacity utilization percentage has increased for most provinces resulting in increased efficiency. This also coincides with a drop in empty kilometres percentage as shown in graph 1. The only province that has not seen an increase is Alberta which has remained relatively constant and currently stands at an average of 91.3% for 2015 which is the highest capacity utilization percentage of all provinces. The dip of just 0.8% from 2011 is negligible.

Province Capacity Utilization (%)
2011 2015
British Columbia 88.0% 90.8%
Alberta 92.1% 91.3%
Saskatchewan/Manitoba 79.4% 90.1%
Ontario 84.7% 87.1%
Quebec 78.6% 90.4%
Atlantic 82.3% 86.0%
 

Archived SmartWay Trends and Statistics

2008-2015: Carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions of Canadian class 8b truck carriers decrease in companies’ first five years in SmartWay
CO2 and Particle Matter Emissions of Canadian 8b truck carriers decrease in companies’ first five years in SmartWay

This graph shows both the average carbon dioxide (CO2) and particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions in grams/tonne-kilometer (g/tkm) from class 8b truck carriers over the first five years of these companies’ participation in the SmartWay Program. In the graph above, Year 0 is the year a company has joined the program and each subsequent column tracks their progress according to the years passed since they joined. This graph shows that average CO2 and PM2.5 emissions continually decline the longer companies’ are in the program. CO2 emissions were reduced by an average of 12.1% and PM2.5 emissions were reduced by an average of in 59.5% in their first five years. These reductions are a result of fuel savings strategies such as; fuel management plans and training for drivers, aerodynamic truck or trailer technologies, increased capacity utilization (shown in TAB 2) or anti-idling equipment (shown in TAB 3).

Years in SmartWay CO2 Emissions (g/tkm) PM2.5 Emissions (g/tkm)
Year 0 70.97 0.0192
Year 1 70.94 0.0177
Year 2 68.38 0.0141
Year 3 64.60 0.0116
Year 4 65.95 0.0097
Year 5 62.33 0.0078
 
2008-2015: Continuous average capacity utilization improvement of class 8b truck carriers during companies’ first five years in SmartWay
Continuous average capacity utilization improvement of class 8b truck carriers during companies’ first five years in SmartWay

This graph shows the progression of average capacity utilization of Canadian class 8B trucks during their first five years in the SmartWay program. Capacity utilization refers to the percentage of volume or weight capacity of a trailer reached by the current payload. The average capacity utilization grew from 82.4% (when the companies joined SmartWay) to 86.4% during their fifth year in the program. Improving capacity utilization allows transportation of the same amount (in volume or in weight) of goods with fewer trips, therefore reducing emissions and fuel costs. This demonstrates how companies have constantly improved their average capacity utilization strategies during their first years with SmartWay.

Years in SmartWay Capacity Utilization (%)
Year 0 82.4%
Year 1 82.8%
Year 2 84.4%
Year 3 85.2%
Year 4 86.3%
Year 5 86.4%
 
2008-2015: Average idle hours of class 8b truck carriers fluctuates annually during companies’ first five years in SmartWay
Average idle hours of class 8b truck carriers fluctuate during companies’ first five years in SmartWay

This graph shows the average idle hours of class 8b truck carriers during their first five years in the SmartWay program. Since most class 8b trucks are long haul operations, average idle hours are significant and contribute to amount of fuel consumption and thus emissions. There has been a general but small reduction of average idle hours of these truck carriers throughout the first five years since they joined SmartWay. Most notably, within companies’ first year with SmartWay, average idle hours were reduced by 7.3%, suggesting that idling reduction technologies and behaviours may be one of the first improvements made to SmartWay truck carriers.

Years in SmartWay Average Idle Hours
Year 0 765.3
Year 1 709.5
Year 2 692.3
Year 3 708.5
Year 4 731.1
Year 5 714.4
 
2008-2015: Fleet size increases for SmartWay truck carriers during companies’ first five years with the program
SmartWay truck carriers increase in numbers and diversify in type during their first five years with the program

This graph shows the total number of class 8b trucks by trailer body type who have been in the SmartWay program for at least 5 years. Total fleet size increased for companies throughout the first five years in the SmartWay program indicating company expansion. In total, there was a 39% growth rate of total number of trucks over this time.

Years in SmartWay Dry van Reefer Flatbed Tanker Chassis Total
Year 0

6541

2449 960 158 570 10678
Year 1

5910

2802 1931 222 2148 13013
Year 2

7142

3768 1273 233 1027 13443
Year 3

7056

3303 1121 171 986 12637
Year 4

7075

3033 1538 225 936 12807
Year 5

8550

3170 1421 471 1266 14878
 
2008-2015: Average number of trucks by body type increases over first five years for SmartWay partners
By trailer body types, average number of SmartWay class 8b trucks per company increase over first five years

This graph shows the average number of Canadian class 8b trucks per company by their different trailer types. Every trailer body type observed a positive overall growth trend over the first five years since joining SmartWay. Tankers, which represent the smallest portion of 8b trucks, proportionately grew the largest with an average 146% overall increase, while Chassis grew by 84%. This may be from diversification of trailer types within companies after joining SmartWay, or specialized fleets growing faster than the more common dry van fleets. Dry vans, which represent about 55% of all class 8b trucks, on average grew by 8% over the first 5 years.

Truck Type Year 0 Year 5
Dry van 49.2 53.1
Reefer 18.4 19.7
Flatbed 7.2 8.8
Tanker 1.2 2.9
Chassis 4.3 7.9
 
2014: The Amount of Long Haul Activity Varies by Fuel Type (All Truck Classes, 2014)
Across Canada a Majority of Truck Activity is Long Haul (Class 8a and 8b, 2014)

This graph shows Canadian SmartWay partners’ percentages of activity by region that is short haul versus long haul. Across Canada there is a higher percentage of long haul truck activity. Graph 1 helps explain this; since Class 8b trucks represent more than 90% of the Canadian trucks in SmartWay, it is expected that most of the operations across the country would also be long haul. Saskatchewan and Manitoba have the highest percentage of long haul truck activity, 24% more in comparison to BC, who has the smallest percentage. BC’s relatively low rate of long haul activity may be explained by its higher percentage of drayage operations, which as shown in Graph 3, has a larger percentage of short haul activity.

Percentages of activity by region
Region Short Haul (%) Long Haul (%)
BC 44.6 55.4
Alberta 33.2 66.8
Sask/Man 20.5 79.5
Ontario 35.1 64.9
Quebec 30.5 69.5
Atlantic Canada 33.9 66.1
 
2014: Across Canada a Majority of Truck Activity is Long Haul (Class 8a and 8b, 2014)

Across Canada a Majority of Truck Activity is Long Haul (Class 8a and 8b, 2014)

Across Canada a Majority of Truck Activity is Long Haul (Class 8a and 8b, 2014)

This graph shows Canadian SmartWay partners’ percentages of activity by region that is short haul versus long haul. Across Canada there is a higher percentage of long haul truck activity. Graph 1 helps explain this; since Class 8b trucks represent more than 90% of the Canadian trucks in SmartWay, it is expected that most of the operations across the country would also be long haul. Saskatchewan and Manitoba have the highest percentage of long haul truck activity, 24% more in comparison to BC, who has the smallest percentage. BC’s relatively low rate of long haul activity may be explained by its higher percentage of drayage operations, which as shown in Graph 3, has a larger percentage of short haul activity.

Percentages of activity by region
Region Short Haul (%) Long Haul (%)
BC 44.6 55.4
Alberta 33.2 66.8
Sask/Man 20.5 79.5
Ontario 35.1 64.9
Quebec 30.5 69.5
Atlantic Canada 33.9 66.1
 
2014: Truck Activity Varies by Operation Type (All Classes, 2014)

Truck Activity Varies by Operation Type (All Classes, 2014)

Truck Activity Varies by Operation Type (All Classes, 2014)

This graph shows SmartWay partners’ percentages of activity by operation that is short haul versus long haul. There is no clear majority amongst the different truck operation categories; Expedited and Truckload operations have a higher percentage of long haul activity while LTL, Drayage, and Package Delivery have a higher percentage of short haul activity. Package Delivery operations have the smallest percentage of long haul activity while Truckload has the smallest percentage of short haul activity. The distributions for these operations are as expected since LTL, Drayage, and Package Delivery operations generally cover shorter distances, while Truckload and Expedited are more geared towards farther destinations, making them long haul operations.

Truck Activity by Operation
Truck Operation Short Haul (%) Long Haul (%)
Truckload 34.3 65.7
LTL 63.4 36.6
Drayage 77.0 23
Package Delivery 90.2 9.8
Expedited 41.9 58.1
Mixed 49.8 50.2
 
2014: Long Haul Activity is the Majority of Activity in Both Canada and the US (Class 8b Trucks, 2014)

Long Haul Activity is the Majority of Activity in Both Canada and the US (Class 8b Trucks, 2014)

Long Haul Activity is the Majority of Activity in Both Canada and the US (Class 8b Trucks, 2014)

This graph shows Canadian and American SmartWay partners’ percentages of Class 8b activity by country that is short haul versus long haul. There is a slight increase in the percentage of long haul activity in the United States compared to Canada. However, in both countries, long haul activities make up the majority of class 8b truck activity. Again, this is expected as Graph 1 shows that Class 8b truck activity is primarily long haul.

Long Haul Activity
Country Short Haul (%) Long Haul (%)
Canada 34.5 65.5
United States 37.9 62.1
 
2014: The Amount of Long Haul Activity Varies by Fuel Type (All Truck Classes, 2014)
The Amount of Long Haul Activity Varies by Fuel Type (All Truck Classes, 2014)

This graph shows SmartWay partners’ percentages of activity by fuel type that is short haul versus long haul. Diesel is the only fuel type in which long haul makes up the majority of truck activity. With other fuel types, short haul operations make up the largest percentage of truck activity. Notably, electric vehicles have the smallest amount of long haul activity, which can be explained, in part, by the lack of infrastructure (i.e. charging stations) available on long haul routes. The same rationale can also explain the smaller percentages of long haul activity found in LPG (propane) and natural gas vehicles. The majority of class 8b trucks use diesel, which is more likely to be used for long haul routes. Larger vehicles, such as class 8b trucks, require larger engine sizes which require higher torque to be produced at lower speeds, making diesel the optimal fuel choice. This illustrates why diesel has a higher long haul percentage than other fuel types.

Long Haul Activity by Fuel Type
Fuel Type Short Haul (%) Long Haul (%)
CNG 52.3 47.7
Diesel 38.5 61.5
Electric 88.2 11.8
Gasoline 74.2 25.8
Hybrid 77.8 22.3
LNG 58.3 41.7
LPG 86 14
 
2014: Regional Differences in Fuel Economy for Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners (Class 8b diesel trucks, 2014)
Regional Differences in Fuel  Economy for Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners (Class 8b diesel trucks, 2014)

This graph shows average Class 8b diesel fuel economy (litres per 100 km) for SmartWay truck partners across six Canadian regions in 2014. Ontario and Quebec had the lowest relative rate of fuel use by this measure, while the three western regions had the highest rates. While this graph shows differences in fuel use across regions, it does not account for other differences relevant to fuel use such as geography, climate, payload, and operational differences such as fleet and truck type.

Province Average L/100km (Actual)
British Columbia 43.5
Alberta 50.6
Sask/ Man 43.1
Ontario 41.0
Quebec 38.6
Atlantic 42.0
 
2014: Regional Differences in Average Payload Occur for Canadian SmartWay Truck Partners (Class 8b Diesel Trucks, 2014)
As the capacity utilization of Class 8b truck trailers increases, empty kilometres declines

This graph shows the average payload in tonnes for SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers across six Canadian regions in 2014.   SmartWay partners from all regions had an average payload between 17.5 and 22.5 tonnes, with those from Alberta, British Columbia, and Quebec having had the highest average payload.  Western regions tended to have higher average payloads, but differences across regions are moderate. Regional climate, transportation networks, and operational diffrerences such as fleet type and use of long-combination vehicles can impact the average payload in a given region, and may partially explain the differences shown.

Province Average Payload (Metric Tonnes)
British Columbia 22.5
Alberta 20.8
Sask/ Man 19.6
Ontario 19.2
Quebec 20.4
Atlantic 17.5
 
2014: Relative Fuel Economy Performance Differs When Accounting for Average Payload (2014, Class 8b diesel trucks)
Canadian SmartWay truck fleets are decreasing their total kilometres while American SmartWay truck fleets are increasing their total kilometres

This graph shows the average payload-weighted fuel economy for SmartWay carriers across six Canadian regions in 2014.  A tonne-kilometre is the movement of one tonne of freight over a distance of one kilometre. Litres per tonne-kilometre captures the effect of both distance travelled and average payload on fuel consumption. Regional comparisons in fuel economy by this measure are different from what is shown in Graph 1. This can be explained in part by Graph 2, where average payload is shown to differ across regions. For example, Alberta’s fuel economy differed signficantly from that in the Atlantic region in terms of litres per 100 km, but the two regions had a near equal rate of fuel consumption when accounting for payload. This means that as average payload differs across regions, it is important to consider this factor when comparing average regional fuel economy and other performane measures. Differences in geography, climate, transportation networks, and operation type can also have an impact on both average payload and either measure of fuel economy.

Province Litres per tonne km
British Columbia 1.93
Alberta 2.43
Sask/ Man 2.20
Ontario 2.14
Quebec 1.89
 
2014: Average Proportion of Empty Kilometers Varies Across Canadian Regions (Class 8b Diesel Trucks, 2014)
The average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian SmartWay trucks is declining at a faster rate than American SmartWay trucks

This graph shows the average proportion of empty kilometres to total kilometres for SmartWay truck carriers across six Canadian regions in 2014. Quebec and British Columbia are shown to have had the lowest proportion of empty kilometres. This means that truck partners from these regions do relatively well at limiting trips with empty trailers. However, this graph does not capture operational differences across regions that might lead to this outcome. Some operation types such as tanker fleets are required to operate with a higher proportion of empty kilometres (See archived SmartWay Trends and Statistics: “The Percentage of Empty Kilometres Varies Between Truck Body Types.

Province Proportion of Empty Kilometres
British Columbia 8.6%
Alberta 13.4%
Sask/ Man 12.0%
Ontario 14.3%
Quebec 9.2%
Atlantic 13.3%
 
2014: Average Cube Out Percentage Varies Across Regions in Canada (Class 8b Diesel Trucks, 2014)
American SmartWay truck carriers replace a greater percentage of their Class 8b trucks each year than Canadian SmartWay truck carriers

This graph shows the average cube out percentage for SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers across six Canadian regions in 2014. Cube out percentage refers to the proportion of truck loads which reach the volume capacity of a trailer. SmartWay partners from Quebec had the highest average cube out percentage in 2014, while Ontario and Alberta had the lowest. This relates to Graph 4,  showing that those regions with a low average proportion of empty kilometres often had a high average cube out percentage. For example, SmartWay partners from Quebec had a relatively low proportion of empty kilometres, and a relatively high average cube out percentage. While this does not hold for all regions, it suggests that measures for trucking efficiency may be relate to each other in some cases.

Province Average Cube Out Percentage
British Columbia 82%
Alberta 75%
Sask/ Man 80%
Ontario 74%
Quebec 88%
Atlantic 82%
 
2011-2014: SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers are using their trailer space more efficiently
SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers are using their trailer space more efficiently

This graph shows the average cube out percentage and the average payload of SmartWay Class 8b truck carrier trailers. Cube out refers to reaching the volume capacity of a trailer. SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers are increasing the average volume of shipments in their trailers while the payload remains relatively unchanged. This means that SmartWay truck carriers are improving their trailer capacity utilization per shipment.

Year

Average Cube Out (%)

Average Payload (tonnes)

2011

71.1

18.4

2012

71.8

17.8

2013

73.4

17.9

2014

76.3

18.0

 
2011-2014: As the capacity utilization of Class 8b truck trailers increases, empty kilometres declines
As the capacity utilization of Class 8b truck trailers increases, empty kilometres declines

This graph shows the capacity utilization percentage and the percentage of empty kilometres of SmartWay Class 8b truck carriers. SmartWay truck carriers are increasing the capacity utilization of their trailers. An increasing average cube out can help to explain this, as shown in TAB 1. This increase in capacity utilization is also correlated with a decrease in the percentage of empty kilometres.

Year Capacity Utilization (%) Empty Kilometres (%)
2011 84.7% 16.6%
2012 86.3% 16.5%
2013 86.5% 16.3%
2014 87.0% 16.1%

2011-2014: As the capacity utilization of Class 8b truck trailers increases, empty kilometres declines

 
2011-2014: Canadian SmartWay truck fleets are decreasing their total kilometres while American SmartWay truck fleets are increasing their total kilometres
Canadian SmartWay truck fleets are decreasing their total kilometres while American SmartWay truck fleets are increasing their total kilometres

This graph shows the average total kilometres for Canadian SmartWay truck fleets and American SmartWay truck fleets. American SmartWay truck fleets are, on average, much larger than Canadian SmartWay truck fleets, which explains why their total kilometres are higher than Canadian fleets. Total kilometres for Canadian truck fleets are decreasing while total kilometres for American truck fleets are increasing. We would expect this trend to increase as smaller fleets continue to join the SmartWay program in Canada.

Year Average Total Km per Truck Fleet in Canada Average Total Km per Truck Fleet in the US
2011 14,836,707 28,730,725
2012 13,821,602 29,265,288
2013 13,924,330 29,700,861
2014 12,491,391 30,115,541
 
2011-2014: The average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian SmartWay trucks is declining at a faster rate than American SmartWay trucks
The average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian SmartWay trucks is declining at a faster rate than American SmartWay trucks

This graph shows the average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian and American SmartWay truck fleets. Average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian and American SmartWay truck carriers are declining. The average total kilometres per Class 8b truck for Canadian SmartWay trucks is declining at a faster rate than American SmartWay trucks, however the average total kilometres per Class 8b trucks were higher in Canada to begin with. The average total kilometres per Class 8b trucks for Canadian SmartWay truck fleets is starting to converge with American SmartWay truck fleets. A possible explanation for this is SmartWay truck carriers are increasing their trailer utilization per truck, as shown in TAB 1, and reducing the number of delivery trips.

Year Average Total Km per Class 8b Truck in Canada Average Total Km per Class 8b Truck in the US
2011 152,726 144,680
2012 151,936 144,512
2013 146,908 143,687
2014 143,994 141,607
 
2011-2014: American SmartWay truck carriers replace a greater percentage of their Class 8b trucks each year than Canadian SmartWay truck carriers
American SmartWay truck carriers replace a greater percentage of their Class 8b trucks each year than Canadian SmartWay truck carriers

This graph shows the percentage of Class 8b trucks replaced by Canadian versus American SmartWay truck carriers year over year.  American SmartWay truck carriers are replacing their Class 8b trucks at a higher rate than Canadian SmartWay truck carriers. The reasons for this are unclear and merit further research.

Year over Year Trucks Replaced in Canada (%) Trucks Replaced in the US (%)
2011-2012 22% 29%
2012-2013 21% 28%
2013-2014 20% 31%
 
2013: SmartWay shipper companies have lower emissions than SmartWay logistics companies
SmartWay shipper companies have lower emissions than SmartWay logistics companies

These three graphs show a comparison between the overall transportation emissions produced by SmartWay shipper companies versus SmartWay logistics companies in 2013 (data for 2014 is not yet available). They show that shipper companies emitted less carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM2.5), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) than logistics companies.

Long description:

Emission (g/tonne-km) Logistics (2013 results) Shipper (2013 results)
Overall CO2 g/tonne-km 215 125
Overall PM2.5 g/tonne-km 0.08 0.05
Overall NOx g/tonne-km 1.46 0.85
 
2013: Truck fleets hired by SmartWay shippers have lower emissions than truck fleets hired by SmartWay logistics companies
Truck fleets hired by SmartWay shippers have lower emissions than truck fleets hired by SmartWay logistics companies

These three graphs show a comparison between the emissions of truck fleets hired by SmartWay shipper companies versus SmartWay logistics companies in 2013 (data for 2014 is not yet available). Truck fleets hired by SmartWay shippers emitted less carbon dioxide (CO2), particulate matter (PM2.5), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), on average, compared to fleets hired by SmartWay logistics companies. The ratio of truck emissions from shippers to that of logistics companies is generally consistent with their overall emissions for 2013, as shown in TAB 1. SmartWay shipper partners hire a greater percentage of SmartWay truck carriers than logistics partners. SmartWay truck carriers are lower emitting and more fuel efficient than non-SmartWay carriers, which helps explain why shipper companies have lower emissions than logistics companies overall (TAB 1).

To learn more about how to reduce your company’s fuel use, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564

Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Long description:

Emission (g/tonne-km) Logistics (2013 results) Shipper (2013 results)
Truck CO2 g/tonne-km 202 114
Truck PM2.5 g/tonne-km 0.06 0.03
Truck NOx g/tonne-km 1.31 0.61
 
2011-2013: SmartWay shippers are increasing their use of SmartWay multi-modal carriers
SmartWay shippers are increasing their use of SmartWay multi-modal carriers

This graph shows SmartWay shippers’ percent use of SmartWay vs non-SmartWay multi-modal carriers for each reporting year.  Multi-modal refers to the transportation of goods under a single carrier that is performed with at least two different modes of transportation. Since 2011, shippers have increased their use of SmartWay multi-modal carriers.

Long description:

Year Percentage of Multi-modal Carriers
2011 69%
2012 71%
2013 76%
2011-2013: SmartWay shipper partners are reducing their multi-modal CO2 emissions
SmartWay shipper partners are reducing multi-modal CO2 emissions

This graph shows the multi-modal transport CO2 g/tonne-km emissions rate for shippers emitted in each reporting year available. Referring to TAB 3, there is a correlation between SmartWay shippers increasing their use of SmartWay multi-modal carriers and decreasing their multi-modal CO2 g/tonne-km. On average, SmartWay multi-modal carriers are cleaner and more fuel efficient than non-SmartWay multi-modal carriers.

To learn more about how to reduce your company’s fuel use, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Long description:

Year Multi-modal CO2 g/tonne-km
2011 42.7
2012 36.1
2013 35.1
 
2011-2014: Canadian SmartWay logistics partners have higher average truck CO2 emissions rates than American partners
Canadian SmartWay logistics partners have higher average truck CO<sub>2</sub> emissions rates than American partners

This graph shows the average CO2 emissions rates in grams per tonne-kilometre from truck carriers hired by Canadian and American SmartWay logistics partners. A tonne-kilometre is a unit representing the movement of one tonne of freight over a distance of one kilometer. On average, Canadian logistics partners have higher CO2 emissions rates than American partners. For more details, please refer to the graph under Tab 2.

Long description:

Year Average CO2 Emissions Rates
(g/tonne-km)
US Canada
2011 202 240
2012 200 245
2013 203 258
2014 205 241
 
2011-2014: American logistics companies are reducing their truck-related CO2 emissions rates by preferentially hiring SmartWay truck carriers over non-SmartWay truck carriers
American logistics companies are reducing their truck-related CO<sub>2</sub> emissions rates by preferentially hiring SmartWay truck carriers over non-SmartWay truck carriers

Average CO2 emissions rates, shown under Tab 1, are directly related to the average percentage of truck freight (in tonne-kilometres) moved by SmartWay truck carriers, since SmartWay truck carriers generally have lower emissions rates than non-SmartWay carriers. As indicated above, American logistics partners tend to move more freight with SmartWay truck carriers compared to Canadian logistics partners. Consequently, Canadian logistics partners have higher CO2 emissions rates. Canadian logistics partners can improve their truck operations CO2 emissions performance by shipping more with SmartWay truck carriers and/or recruiting their non-SmartWay truck carriers into the program.

For more information on how SmartWay can help you work with your company’s carriers to improve your performance, please contact us.
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: nrcan.smartway.rncan@canada.ca

Long description:


Year
Average % of SmartWay Logistics Partner Truck
Freight Moved by SmartWay Truck Carriers
US Canada
2011 50% 39%
2012 50% 35%
2013 49% 28%
2014 48% 32%
 
2013: Canadian SmartWay logistics partners tend to work with more fuel-efficient truck carriers (those ranked in Bin 1 and Bin 2, which have the best CO2 emissions rates in grams per tonne-kilometre)
Canadian SmartWay logistics partners tend to work with more fuel-efficient truck carriers (those ranked in Bin 1 and Bin 2, which have the best CO<sub>2</sub> emissions rates in grams per tonne-kilometre)

This graph shows the distribution of freight moved on behalf of Canadian SmartWay logistics partners by SmartWay truck carriers, according to the truck carriers’ CO2 emissions rates in grams per tonne-kilometre (g/tonne-km). SmartWay truck carriers are placed in one of five performance bins based on their emissions rates. Each bin represents 20% of the SmartWay truck carriers and Bin 1 represents the best performance. In 2013, over half of all the freight moved by Canadian logistics partners with SmartWay truck carriers was moved with carriers from the top 2 bins. This suggests that Canadian SmartWay logistics partners tend to work with more fuel-efficient truck carriers. Fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions are directly related.

Long description:

Emissions Performance
Category
% Freight Moved by
SmartWay Truck Carriers
Bin 1 21.1%
Bin 2 31.7%
Bin 3 22.4%
Bin 4 12.5%
Bin 5 13.4%
 
2013: Logistics companies can reduce their emissions by switching modes of freight transportation
Logistics companies can reduce their emissions by switching modes of freight transportation

This graph shows average CO2 emissions rates per type of carrier hired by SmartWay logistics partners in 2013. The five types of carriers hired by logistics companies are Truck, Rail, Barge, and Multi-modal. Multi-modal companies include any combination of rail, barge, and truck carriers. Truck is the highest CO2 emitting mode of freight transportation. Switching modes, when possible, from truck to a carrier mode with lower emissions such as rail or barge is one way logistics companies can reduce their emissions.;

Please contact us for more information on how your logistics company can benefit from the SmartWay program.
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: nrcan.smartway.rncan@canada.ca

Long description:

Type of Carrier Hired Average CO2 Emissions Rates
(g/tonne-km)
Rail 14
Barge 21
Multi-modal 58
Truck 287
 
2010-2013: The number of logistics companies registered with SmartWay has increased every year
The number of logistics companies registered with SmartWay has increased every year

This graph shows the number of US and Canadian logistics companies registered in the SmartWay Transport Partnership for each of the past four years. Since 2010, the number of logistics partners has been increasing steadily. A logistics company is a company managing, brokering or forwarding freight for shipper clients. SmartWay helps logistics companies to benchmark operations, track fuel consumption and improve environmental performance annually. Please contact us for more information to register your logistics company with SmartWay.

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Long description
Year Number of Companies
2010 450
2011 501
2012 508
2013 522
 
2013: Majority of SmartWay partners hired by logistics companies are truck carriers
SmartWay logistics companies hire SmartWay truck load/dry van body types most frequently

This graph shows the percentage of trucks hired for each truck body type. The most frequent hired truck body type is Truck Load/Dry Van with 43.4%. The second and third most frequent hired truck body type are Mixed and Refrigerated trucks with 28.2% and 15.0% respectively. The ‘other’ category includes Package, Specialized, Tanker and Truck/Rail truck body types. This order is consistent with the number of fleets of each category registered in SmartWay, with TL/Dry Van, Mixed, and Refrigerated being the three most common truck body types.

Long description
Truck Body Type Percentage Hired
TL/Dry Van 43.4%
Mixed 28.2%
Refrigerated 15.0%
LTL/Dry Van 5.0%
Flatbed 4.4%
Dray 2.2%
Other 1.9%
 
2013: Trucks and logistics carriers moved the highest percentage of total tonne kilometres for SmartWay logistics companies
Trucks and logistics carriers moved the highest percentage of total tonne kilometres for SmartWay logistics companies

This graph shows the percentage of total tonne kilometres moved by carrier mode. Trucks and logistics carriers moved the highest percentage of total tonne kilometres, and together represent 64% of the total tonne kilometres. Multi-model carriers rank second with 25%. Although rail and barge companies represent less than 1% of registered SmartWay carriers (see tab 2), the percentage of total tonne kilometres is much higher: 8% and 4% respectively. This corresponds with the higher average payload that can be moved by rail or barges. Additionally, the energy use of rail and barges is much lower than the energy use of trucks.

Long description
Carrier Mode Percentage Total Tonne KM
Truck 32%
Logistics 32%
Multi-modal 25%
Rail 8%
Barge 4%

As seen in this graph, the average ages of engines were relatively lower in Canada than in the US in both 2012 and 2013. Newer engines are associated with lower nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions (see graph 4).

 
2013: SmartWay logistics companies hire SmartWay truck load/dry van body types most frequently
SmartWay logistics companies hire SmartWay truck load/dry van body types most frequently

This graph shows the percentage of trucks hired for each truck body type. The most frequent hired truck body type is Truck Load/Dry Van with 43.4%. The second and third most frequent hired truck body type are Mixed and Refrigerated trucks with 28.2% and 15.0% respectively. The ‘other’ category includes Package, Specialized, Tanker and Truck/Rail truck body types. This order is consistent with the number of fleets of each category registered in SmartWay, with TL/Dry Van, Mixed, and Refrigerated being the three most common truck body types.

Long description
Truck Body Type Percentage Hired
TL/Dry Van 43.4%
Mixed 28.2%
Refrigerated 15.0%
LTL/Dry Van 5.0%
Flatbed 4.4%
Dray 2.2%
Other 1.9%
 
2009-2013: Average Payload in Canada and the US for Class 8B Trucks Converge in 2013
Average Payload in Canada and the US for Class 8B Trucks Converge in 2013

This graph shows the average payload per truck in Canada and the US for five consecutive years from 2009 to 2013. In Canada, the line graph plateaus and then declines in the more recent years. In the US, the line plateaus and then slightly increases in the last few years. In 2013, both Canada and the US reached a similar level of average payload, where the line graphs converge.

Long description
Average Payload per Truck US CAN
2009 15.9 18.5
2010 17.4 19.2
2011 17.4 19.2
2012 17.0 18.9
2013 17.3 17.2
 
2009-2013: Rate of Carbon dioxide (CO2) Emissions in Canada and the US Fluctuate Over Time for Class 8B Trucks
Rate of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions in Canada and the US Fluctuate Over Time for Class 8B Trucks

This graph shows the rates of carbon dioxide CO2 (g/tkm) for five consecutive years. CO2 emissions are directly related to fuel consumption. Changes in fuel consumption per tonne-km are correlated with changes in average payload. Therefore, the increase in CO2 emissions in Canada in 2013 reflects the lower average payload seen for the same period (graph 1).

Companies can improve their trucks’ performance by implementing more fuel efficient activities. To learn more about fuel efficient activities, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Long description
Year US CAN
2009 69.07 66.61
2010 64.10 62.94
2011 64.95 65.26
2012 65.85 65.76
2013 64.93 68.94
 
2012-2013: Newer Engine Ages in Canada for Class 8B Trucks
Newer Engine Ages in Canada for Class 8B Trucks
Long description
Country Average Engine Age in 2012 Average Engine Age in 2013
US 6.67 5.87
CAN 5.81 5.14

As seen in this graph, the average ages of engines were relatively lower in Canada than in the US in both 2012 and 2013. Newer engines are associated with lower nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions (see graph 4).

 
2013: Influx of New Vehicles in Canada in 2013 Led to Lower Rates of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Emissions
Influx of New Vehicles in Canada in 2013 Led to Lower Rates of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Emissions

This graph shows the 2013 rates of PM2.5 (g/tkm) and NOx (g/tkm) emissions in the US and Canada for class 8B trucks. Two distinct vertical axes are used to represent the levels of PM2.5 and NOx emissions, allowing for better comparison. The blue bar graph represents the amount of NOx emissions, and can be read off of the vertical axis on the right side. The red bar graph represents the amount of PM2.5 emissions and can be read off of the vertical axis on the left side.

Overall, Canada had relatively lower PM2.5 and NOx emissions in 2013, which suggests that a lower average engine age, as was the case for Canadian trucks is related to lower rates of emissions (Graph 3).

Long description
Emissions (g/tkm) US CAN
NOx 0.323418 0.264967
PM2.5 0.010674 0.008521
 
2009-2013: SmartWay Truck Carriers are Reducing Their Empty Kilometres
SmartWay Truck Carriers are reducing their empty kilometres

This graph shows the average percentage of empty kilometres out of total kilometres driven for the past five years for SmartWay truck carrier partners. Empty kilometres are kilometres driven without payload. Since 2009, the average percentage of empty kilometres has been declining steadily. This suggests an increasing number of SmartWay partners are improving their route planning and capacity utilization, which reduces energy use while helping their bottom line.
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Long description
Year Average % of
Empty Kilometres
2009 17.5%
2010 17.2%
2011 16.6%
2012 16.5%
2013 16.3%
 
2013: The Percentage of Empty Kilometres Varies between Truck Body Types
The Percentage of Empty Kilometres Varies between Truck Body Types

This graph shows the average percentage of empty kilometres for each truck body type. Empty kilometres are kilometres driven without payload.  Refrigerated trucks and dry van trucks travel less than 15% of their total kilometres while empty, while body types like heavy haul and tanker travel over 30% of their total kilometres while empty.  The higher percentages for these body types reflect the more specialized nature of their operations that makes finding back haul loads more difficult. The order of the distribution of the body types by percentage of empty kilometres is similar to the distribution of body types based on their average payload.

Long description
Truck Body Type Percentage of Empty Kilometres
Refrigerated 13%
Dry Van 13%
Mixed 18%
Flatbed 18%
Moving 19%
Chassis 24%
Auto 29%
Special Haul 33%
Heavy Haul 35%
Tanker 42%
 
2010-2013: Private Fleets have a Higher Percentage of Empty Kilometres
Private Fleets have a Higher Percentage of Total Empty Kilometres

This graph shows the difference between for-hire fleets and private fleets in their average percentage of empty kilometres. Empty kilometres are kilometres driven without payload. For-hire fleets had a lower percentage of empty kilometres than private fleets in each year between 2010 and 2013. One potential reason for this is that private fleets usually move freight for just one company, making it more difficult to find freight for back-haul trips.

Long description
Reporting Year Percentage of Empty Kilometres
for Private Fleets
Percentage of Empty Kilometres
for For-Hire Fleets
2010 19.0% 16.8%
2011 17.5% 16.3%
2012 17.5% 16.3%
2013 17.7% 16.2%
 
2013: Medium-sized Fleets have the Lowest Percentage of Empty Kilometres
Selecting the Correct Fuel Consumption Metric is Important

This graph shows the total percentage of empty kilometres travelled for fleets of different sizes.  Empty kilometres are kilometres driven without payload. When fleets are divided into five groups of equal size based on the number of trucks in each fleet, it can be seen that the medium-sized fleets have the lowest rate of empty kilometres while the smallest and largest fleets have the highest rate of empty kilometres. This suggests there may be operational challenges facing larger and smaller truck fleets that make reducing their empty kilometres more difficult compared to medium size fleets.

Long description
Fleet size % of Empty Kilometres
Smallest Fleets 17.4%
Small-Medium Fleets 16.3%
Medium Fleets 16.0%
Medium-Large Fleets 15.9%
Largest Fleets 16.5%
 
2013: Average Distance Travelled per Truck Varies Between Vehicle Body Types
Average Distance Travelled per Truck Varies Between Vehicle Body Types

This graph shows the number of kilometres driven by each type of truck. The truck types are shown in the order of least to greatest number of kilometres travelled per truck. Heavy haul trucks travel the most kilometres per truck, while special haul travel the fewest kilometres per truck.

Body Type Average Kilometres Driven per Truck
Special Haul 88,767
Chassis 97,852
Auto 108,025
Tanker 132,387
Dry Van 138,665
Flatbed 140,754
Mixed 141,974
Reefer 151,558
Heavy Haul 164,752
 
2013: Average Payload per Truck Body Type
SmartWay influences truck carriers to engage in fuel efficiency improvement activities

This graph shows the average payload performance for each truck type. Heavy haul trucks are shown to have the highest average payload out of all vehicle body types. A higher average payload is related to a higher average fuel consumption.

Body Type Average Kilometres Driven per Truck
Dry Van 14.7
Reefer 16.1
Auto 18.7
Mixed 19.4
Chassis 19.5
Flatbed 21.1
Tanker 24.7
Special Haul 30.0
Heavy Haul 35.3
 
2013: Average Payload Affects Fuel Consumption
Average Payload Affects Fuel Consumption

This graph shows the fuel consumption (L/100km) for each truck type. The average payload affects the average fuel consumption for vehicles of all body types. In fact, there is a positive relationship between the two factors: the higher the average payload, the higher the fuel consumption.

This relationship can be seen by comparing this graph to the graph in Tab 2. The order of the trucks listed on the two graphs is very similar.

Natural Resources Canada offers free resources, information, and training that can help trucks of all operations reduce their fuel consumption.

To learn more about the effect of idling on fuel consumption, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Body Type L/100km (Diesel Litre Equivalent)
Dry Van 36.9
Mixed 40.3
Reefer 40.9
Auto 43.9
Flatbed 44.2
Chassis 44.6
Tanker 45.1
Special Haul 52.8
Heavy Haul 56.5
 
2013: Selecting the Correct Fuel Consumption Metric is Important
Selecting the Correct Fuel Consumption Metric is Important

This graph shows the fuel consumption (L/tonne-100km) for each truck type. A tonne-kilometre is the movement of one tonne of freight one kilometre. This change in metric causes the order in which the trucks were listed on the graph in Tab 3, to be flipped in this graph.

The body types with the highest fuel consumption per tonne/100-kilometre, for example, dry van and reefer, tend to have lower average payloads (Tab 2), and better L/100km fuel consumption (Tab 3). This explains why dry van and reefer are listed at the top of the graph in Tab 3. It is important for companies such as SmartWay shipper and logistics partners that hire transportation services to consider which fuel consumption metric is best for them when tracking their carriers’ performance.

Body Type L/tonne-100km
Heavy Haul 1.57
Special Haul 1.76
Tanker 1.98
Flatbed 2.17
Mixed 2.2
Chassis 2.28
Auto 2.47
Dry Van 2.59
Reefer 2.61
 
2013: SmartWay influences truck carriers to engage in fuel efficiency improvement activities
SmartWay influences truck carriers to engage in fuel efficiency improvement activities

93% of SmartWay partners undertook at least one fuel efficiency improvement measure in 2013, with the majority of these decisions being influenced by SmartWay participation.  These actions have helped SmartWay-registered Canadian truck carriers reduce their diesel fuel use by over 50 million litres in 2013.

To learn more on fuel efficient activities promoted by SmartWay, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Fuel Efficiency Measure Influenced by SmartWay Not Influenced by SmartWay
Increased use of anti-idling equipment 37% 18%
Improved routing 34% 13%
Increased use of tractor aerodynamics 34% 14%
Increased use of fuel efficient tires 32% 13%
Improved capacity utilization 31% 10%
Increased use of on-board computers 26% 11%
Accelerated turnover of tractors 25% 11%
Increased use of lightweight trailers 25% 9%
Creation of a fuel management plan 12% 5%
Fuel-efficient driver training 10% 5%
Other 10% 4%
Increased use of alternative/bio-fuels 3% 3%
 
2009-2013: For-hire SmartWay truck carriers consume fuel at a lower rate than private/dedicated SmartWay truck carrier fleets
For-hire SmartWay truck carriers consume fuel at a lower rate than private /dedicated SmartWay truck carrier fleets

For-hire SmartWay truck carriers, which account for 81% of trucks registered in SmartWay, consume fuel at a lower rate than private and dedicated carriers (companies whose activity is contracted with a specific shipper).  Natural Resources Canada offers free resources, information, and training that can help truck carriers reduce their fuel consumption. 

To learn more on fuel consumption reporting, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Year L/t100km -For-Hire L/t100km - Private
2009 2.34 2.61
2010 2.20 2.23
2011 2.18 2.39
2012 2.17 2.50
2013 2.14 2.54
 
2008-2013: Class 8b trucks are idling less
Class 8b trucks are idling less

The amount of idling per Class 8b truck has been trending down by about three percent each year over the six years of available program data.  Less idling means lower fuel use, lower emissions, and lower fuel costs for the trucking sector.

To learn more about the effect of idling on fuel consumption, contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Year Average Reported Idle Hours per Truck Trend in Average Reported Idle Hours per Truck
2008 731 714
2009 655 695
2010 700 675
2011 666 655
2012 613 636
2013 626 616
 
2004-2014: SmartWay-registered trucks are getting newer
SmartWay-registered trucks are getting newer

The average age of truck engines in SmartWay is 5.31 years, and 81% of the trucks in SmartWay have an engine model year of 2004 or newer.  Engine age is one of the most important factors contributing to nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and the use of 2007 or newer engine models can significantly reduce a fleet’s NOx and PM emissions. 

To learn more about the emissions benefits of newer engines contact us:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Engine Model Year Number of Trucks
2004 10992
2005 22719
2006 31042
2007 45179
2008 16877
2009 28640
2010 32760
2011 43277
2012 71827
2013 74527
2014 47528
Total 482857
 
2010-2012: Shippers are increasing their usage of SmartWay certified Carriers
Shippers are increasing their usage of SmartWay certified Carriers

SmartWay shippers are increasingly asking for carriers to be SmartWay certified. In 2012, SmartWay Shippers carried out 88.2% of their activity with SmartWay carriers, a 3% increase from 2010.

While filling out the Shipper Tool, Shipper companies report on their SmartWay-registered carriers as well as their non-SmartWay carriers. As a result, SmartWay shippers are noticing how much they are saving by using SmartWay carriers. Shippers can check out the SmartWay’s Partner List to find companies which are committed to reducing their fuel consumption.

To learn more about SmartWay or to join the partnership, contact us:
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Reporting Year % of SmartWay Carrier usage per KM
2010 85.6
2011 87.7
2012 88.2
 
2011-2012: SmartWay helps companies lower their emissions
SmartWay helps companies lower their emissions

SmartWay Shipper Partners are reducing their CO2 emissions using the SmartWay Transport Partnership. In the last year, SmartWay Shippers reduced their emissions by 2% with strategies such as using SmartWay participation and environmental performance as criteria for selecting carriers. Not only did SmartWay Shippers reduce their emissions, but by using less fuel they also helped reduce the transportation costs of moving their goods.

To learn more about SmartWay or to join the partnership, contact us:
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Reporting Year Composite Truck CO2 g/km
2011 1039
2012 1021
 
2011-2012: SmartWay Shipper Partners PM2.5 Emissions Reduction over Time
SmartWay Shipper Partners are Reducing PM2.5 Emissions

SmartWay Shipper Partners reduced the particulate matter (PM) emissions from their transportation activities by 12.5% last year with the help of the SmartWay Transport Partnership. Strategies such as hiring lower emitting carriers helped these companies reduce their harmful PM emissions to this extent.

To learn more on how to save on fuel with the help of SmartWay, contact us:
Telephone: 1-855-322-1564
Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Reporting Year Composite Truck PM2.5 g/tonne-km
2011 0.032
2012 0.028

 

2012: Business Focus of Logistics Partners
 Business Focus of Logistics Partners

In 2012, Canadian and American SmartWay Logistic companies specialized in four supply chain functions, as third party logistics providers, freight forwarders, freight brokers, or truck carriers. Below are definitions of these four supply chain functions:

  • Third-party logistics providers provide multiple, bundled supply chain services such as storage, transportation, material sourcing, etc.;
  • Freight brokers buy and sell transportation services, normally working on behalf of a carrier or shipper;
  • Freight forwarders deal directly with goods that need to be shipped when organizing and executing the transportation of consolidated shipments; and
  • Truck carriers transport goods via on-road vehicles. In SmartWay, truck carriers are considered “logistics partners” if they contract out more than 5% of their goods movement services.

At 61%, freight brokering was the most common business focus of SmartWay Logistics Partners, with 50% of businesses focusing exclusively on brokering.

Logistics companies can check out SmartWay’s Partner List to find thousands of fuel-efficient truck carriers across Canada and the United States that are registered in SmartWay.

To join SmartWay, contact us at:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564

Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

Data as of May 7, 2014
  Logistics Provider Freight Forwarder Freight Broker Truck Carrier
<50 % 95 40 65 49
50-99 % 65 24 93 11
100 % 132 21 158 21
Total Partner count 292 85 316 81
2012: SmartWay Logistics Partners Predominately Use SmartWay Carriers
 SmartWay Logistics Partners Predominately Use SmartWay Carriers

The majority of Canadian and American SmartWay Logistics Partners prefer to use SmartWay carriers for goods movement — 57% of the 1 trillion tonne-kilometres of goods movement in 2012 were carried out with SmartWay carriers.  In 2012, SmartWay Logistics Partners predominately used SmartWay Rail and Truck Partners to move freight (on a weight basis).

Using SmartWay carriers is an effective way to work with the best fuel efficient and environmental performers. Logistics companies can check out SmartWay’s Partner List to find companies which are committed to reducing their fuel consumption.

To join SmartWay, contact us at:

Telephone: 1-855-322-1564

Email: smartway.canada@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

 
Data as of May 7, 2014
SmartWay Category Carrier Percentage
Rail 30%
Truck 18 %
Logistics 5 %
Multi-modal 4%
Non-SmartWay 43%
2012 Truck Tool: How New Are SmartWay Fleets?
Engine Model Year Across Class 8b Trucks

The majority of SmartWay truck carriers operate new and efficient fleets. A new engine contributes greatly to reducing the emissions of harmful pollutants. All engines with model year 2010 or newer are the cleanest and most efficient in terms of emissions reduction.

Long Description:
Pre-1989 542
1989 186
1990 221
1991 269
1992 329
1993 653
1994 1176
1995 2326
1996 2764
1997 4014
1998 5937
1999 9324
2000 12476
2001 10217
2002 9395
2003 11837
2004 15574
2005 28327
2006 38717
2007 53385
2008 17946
2009 32085
2010 41880
2011 42658
2012 76171
2013 51521
2012: The Majority of Canadian SmartWay Truck Carriers are Returning Partners
 The Majority of Canadian SmartWay Truck Carriers are Returning Partners

In 2013, 88% of Canadian Truck Partners participated in the program the year before. Companies who participate in the program for multiple years have access to yearly data to benchmark their operations over time.

SmartWay works with new and returning Partners to become more fuel efficient. Truck carriers interested in becoming part of the SmartWay Transport Partnership may contact SmartWay or complete the 2013 Truck Tool.

Data as of 28 October 2013
  Returning Canadian Partners New Canadian Partners
Number of Partners 218 (88%) 30 (12%)
2012: Most SmartWay Truck Carrier Partners Have fewer than 50 Trucks
 Most SmartWay Truck Carrier Partners Have fewer than 50 Trucks

Canadian and US SmartWay Truck Partners operate a wide variety of fleets, ranging from small fleets with less than 50 trucks to large fleets of over 1000 trucks. The majority of SmartWay fleets are small, with 49% of SmartWay's fleets consisting of less than 50 trucks.

SmartWay accepts truck carriers of any size, with the common goal of improving fleet efficiency. Truck carriers interested in becoming part of the SmartWay Transport Partnership may contact SmartWay or complete the 2013 Truck Tool.

Data as of 12 November 2013
  Number of Fleets Number of Trucks
1-50 Trucks 1270 24881
50-100 Trucks 471 33033
100-500 Trucks 670 136836
500-1000 Trucks 98 70397
1000+ Trucks 94 455167
2012: SmartWay Truck Carrier Fleets are Used in a Wide Range of Operations
 SmartWay truck carrier fleets are used in a wide range of operations

SmartWay Partners are well diversified over a variety of operation and body types. Fleets are compared against other fleets in the same category for benchmarking and emissions ranking to ensure Partners are compared against similar fleets. The largest fleet category is the Truck Load/Dry Van (TL/Dry Van) category, but SmartWay has fleets in all categories.

If you would like to know how your fleet's emissions and operations compare to other fleets registered in SmartWay, contact SmartWay or complete the 2013 Truck Tool.

Data as of 28 October 2013
SmartWay Category Number of Fleets
Truck Load/Dry Van 858
Mixed 530
Refrigerated 474
Flatbed 174
Less Than Truck Load/Dry Van 141
Dray 95
Tanker 82
Expedited 60
Specialized 49
Auto Carrier 38
Moving 35
Package 35
Heavy Haul 20