What does the EnerGuide label mean?

EnerGuide labels help you compare

The familiar black-and-white EnerGuide label shows how much energy a product uses and how it compares to similar models. It helps you make informed decisions about the energy-using products you buy – from big-ticket items like dishwashers to simple light bulbs.

The EnerGuide label on some regulated products – such as major appliances, heating and cooling equipment, and windows, doors and skylights – may include an ENERGY STAR® logo. This symbol is reserved for the most energy-efficient models in each product class.

Learn more about the ENERGY STAR® initiative in Canada.

EnerGuide for appliances

Choose energy-efficient major appliances to add value to your home, keep your family comfortable and healthy, and save money on energy. The EnerGuide label helps consumers compare models and make smart choices.

Canadian versus American labels

Some major appliances may have both a Canadian EnerGuide (black and white) label and an American EnergyGuide label (black and yellow). Canada and the United States use similar methods to rate energy efficiency. However, the scales may differ due to the number and types of models available in each country.

Canada's EnerGuide label
 

The Canadian EnerGuide label shows

  • annual energy consumption in kilowatt hours (kWh)
  • an arrow indicating the model’s performance compared with the most and least efficient models in the same class
  • the type and capacity of models in the same class
  • the model number
  • an ENERGY STAR® logo, if applicable
United States EnergyGuide label
 

The American EnergyGuide label shows

  • key features
  • make, model and size
  • estimated cost of operation based on average electricity use
  • annual energy consumption in kilowatt hours (kWh)
  • an ENERGY STAR® logo, if applicable

Mandatory vs. voluntary labels

The EnerGuide label is mandatory for

The EnerGuide label is voluntary for:

Label types and languages

Mandatory EnerGuide labels are printed on stickers or hanging tags. These labels must provide information in both English and French.

Voluntary EnerGuide labels are usually printed as graphics in the product literature. These labels may be unilingual.