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Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) For the years ending March 31, 2013 and 2014

Statement of Management Responsibility

Departmental management is responsible for these future-oriented financial statements, including responsibility for the appropriateness of the assumptions on which these statements are prepared.  These statements are based on the best information available and the assumptions adopted as at December 31, 2012 and reflect the plans described in the Report on Plans and Priorities. 

These Future-oriented Financial Statements have not been audited.

 

Natural Resources Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
Liabilities
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 6) 446,639 582,924
Vacation pay and compensatory leave 26,263 25,132
Lease obligation for tangible capital assets (Note 7) 74,012 71,812
Employee future benefits (Note 8) 61,686 58,324
Other liabilities (Note 9) 19,000 16,300
Environmental liabilities (Note 17a) 1,027,028 891,311
Total net liabilities 1,654,628 1,645,803
Financial assets
Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund 401,571 533,161
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 10) 125,122 156,465
Loan receivable (Note 11) 40,000 39,333
Total gross financial assets 566,693 728,959
Financial assets held on behalf of Government
Accounts receivable and advances (Note 10) (123,147) (153,995)
Loan receivable (Note 11) (40,000) (39,333)
Total financial assets held on behalf of Government (163,147) (193,328)
Total net financial assets 403,546 535,631
Departmental net debt 1,251,082 1,110,172
Non-financial assets
Prepayments (Note 12) 7,412 8,946
Inventory (Note 13) 1,727 1,641
Tangible capital assets (Note 14) 236,184 249,055
Total non-financial assets 245,323 259,642
Departmental net financial position (Note 15) (1,005,759) (850,530)

Contractual obligations (Note 16)

Contingent liabilities (Note 17)

Contingent recoveries (Note 18)

Information for the year ending March 31, 2013 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012.          

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

 

Natural Resources Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the year ending March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
Expenses
Statutory Programs - Atlantic Offshore 801,749 1,208,302
Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources 379,843 547,270
Internal Services 267,923 116,206
Responsible Natural Resources Management 245,792 283,300
Technology Innovation 176,871 207,993
Innovation for New Products and Processes 92,999 119,687
Landmass Information 74,090 74,598
Investment in Natural Resource Sectors 73,172 78,594
Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources 65,508 66,203
Market Access and Diversification 52,344 61,742
Total expenses 2,230,291 2,763,895
Revenues
Rights and privileges 1,037,285 1,333,658
Revenue from services of a non-regulatory nature 23,865 25,952
Miscellaneous revenue 4,476 4,579
Proceeds from sales of goods and information products 2,783 2,995
Revenue from services of a regulatory nature 1,968 1,968
Revenues earned on behalf of Government (1,037,246) (1,333,382)
Total revenues 33,131 35,770
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,197,160 2,728,125
Government funding and transfers
Net cash provided by Government 2,773,300 2,699,012
Change in due from Consolidated Revenue Fund (523,615) 131,590
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 19) 60,589 52,752
Transfer of assets to other government departments 308 -
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (113,422) (155,229)
Departmental net financial position - Beginning of year (1,119,181) (1,005,759)
Departmental net financial position - End of year (1,005,759) (850,530)

Information for the year ending March 31, 2013 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. 

Segmented information (Note 20)

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Natural Resources Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Change in Departmental Net Debt (Unaudited)
For the year ending March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
Net cost of operations after government funding and transfers (113,422) (155,229)
Change due to tangible capital assets
Acquisition of tangible capital assets 31,038 31,228
Amortization of tangible capital assets (17,270) (17,807)
Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (465) (517)
Net (loss) or gain on disposal of tangible capital assets including adjustments 1,180 (33)
Transfer of assets to other government departments 308 -
Total change due to tangible capital assets 14,791 12,871
Change due to inventories (91) (86)
Change due to prepayment (82,948) 1,534
Net increase (decrease) in departmental net debt (181,670) (140,910)
Departmental net debt - Beginning of year 1,432,752 1,251,082
Departmental net debt - End of year 1,251,082 1,110,172

Information for the year ending March 31, 2013 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. 

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Natural Resources Canada
Future-oriented Statement of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
For the year ending March 31
(In thousands of dollars)
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
Operating activities
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers: 2,197,160 2,728,125
Non-cash items:
Amortization of tangible capital assets (17,270) (17,807)
Gain (loss) on disposal and write-offs of tangible capital assets 1,180 (33)
Services provided without charge by other government departments (Note 19) (60,589) (52,752)
Variations in Statement of financial position:
(Decrease) Increase in accounts receivable and advances (1,287) 495
(Decrease) Increase in prepayments (82,949) 1,534
(Decrease) in inventory (91) (86)
Decrease (Increase) in accounts payable and accrued liabilities 644,012 (136,285)
(Increase) Decrease in vacation pay and compensatory leave (2,329) 1,131
Decrease in future employee benefits 5,633 3,362
Decrease in environmental liabilities 57,982 135,717
(Increase) decrease in other liabilities (850) 2,700
Cash used in operating activities 2,740,602 2,666,101
Capital investing activities
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 31,038 31,228
  Proceeds from disposal of tangible capital assets (465) (517)
Cash used in capital investing activities 30,573 30,711
Financing activities
Lease obligation for tangible capital assets (2,593) (2,518)
Lease payments for tangible capital assets 4,718 4,718
Cash used in financing activities 2,125 2,200
Net cash provided by Government of Canada 2,773,300 2,699,012

Information for the year ending March 31, 2013 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2012 to October 31, 2012. 

The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Natural Resources Canada
Notes to the Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1.  Authority and Objectives

The Department of Natural Resources Canada (Natural Resources Canada) was created on June 25, 1993 by the merger of the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources and the Department of Forestry. This organizational change was effected by Order in Council, pending the passage of legislation which occurred in 1994. The Department’s mandate is primarily based on the Department of Natural Resources Act, the Resources and Technical Surveys Act and the Forestry Act.         

Natural Resources Canada’s vision is to improve the quality of life of Canadians by creating a sustainable resource advantage. It seeks to fulfill this vision by working to: improve the competitiveness of the natural resource sectors; enable the sustainable development of Canada’s resources; and enhance the safety and security of citizens.  

Natural Resources Canada delivers on its mandate through the following programs

(a)  Statutory Programs – Atlantic Offshore

This program activity is about monitoring and facilitating payment disbursal agreements and transfer payments under the Atlantic Offshore Accord Acts.

(b)  Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources

Canada’s energy markets are defined by consumption and production decisions; however, consumers and producers do not necessarily make decisions that minimize their impact on the environment due to several barriers including: 1) a lack of awareness of available options and their benefits, 2) insufficient capacity for adoption (e.g. regulatory frameworks, codes and standards, etc.) and 3) financial risk. The objective of this program activity is to address these barriers and encourage and enable energy consumers and producers to adopt cleaner and more efficient technologies, products, services and practices, thereby transforming the market.

This objective is achieved through education and outreach activities, targeted incentives, and regulatory interventions that keep pace with technological changes.

(c)   Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization.

(d)  Responsible Natural Resource Management

Greater knowledge of risks and environmentally-responsible practices could help to prevent and reduce the environmental impacts of natural resource development. The objectives of the program activity are to enable government departments, regulatory bodies and industry to assess these impacts to the environment and develop, monitor and maintain resources or clean-up wastes responsibly. These objectives are achieved through the provision of assessments and knowledge rooted in sound science, and waste management efforts in collaboration with provinces, federal agencies and municipalities.

(e)  Technology Innovation

Solutions to the environmental challenges faced by the natural resource sectors require sustained efforts in research, development and demonstration because the current level of science and technology is inadequate to address these concerns. However, the natural resource sectors neither have all the necessary knowledge nor make the necessary investments in innovation due to the potential poor return on investment. The objective of this program activity is to encourage academia, industry and the public sector to research, develop and demonstrate innovative solutions to environmental challenges encountered in the natural resource sectors. This objective is achieved through the generation and dissemination of scientific knowledge, and the development and demonstration of new technologies.

(f)    Innovation for New Products and Processes

Optimizing the use of Canada's natural resources and the processes by which they are developed would improve the productivity of the natural resources sectors and reduce its dependency on the sale of traditional natural resource products. The objective of this program activity is twofold: to maximize the productivity and to decrease our dependency on the sale of traditional products by encouraging natural resources sectors to adopt new technologies and processes to develop new products. This objective is achieved by conducting science, research, development, and demonstrations on new applications, technologies, processes, and products.

(g)  Landmass Information

Natural Resources Canada provides clearly defined legal boundaries, a robust property system framework, authoritative geographic infrastructure and fundamental geospatial information on Canada’s landmass. Without these frameworks, negative impact will result to the Canadian economy, environment and standard of living. This program activity delivers Canada's regulatory system for Canada-Lands legal surveys, the fundamental geodetic reference system, earth observation and mapping information. Together, these support the Canadian public, other departments and levels of government, the private sector and academia to carry out a variety of decisions founded on location-based information, such as land transactions, commercial/industrial development, transportation and logistics. This fundamental information enables, effective management of Canada’s natural resources and lands including opportunities for collaboration across jurisdictions (i.e. cross-border planning, regulatory efficiency), which advances the interests of Canada’s natural resources sectors, both domestically and at the international level.

(h)  Investment in Natural Resource Sectors

Investing in the development of natural resources is costly and risky due to the uncertainties related to the potential economic viability of natural resources. There are many factors to consider when deciding whether or not to develop a natural resource. In some cases, investors and/or companies lack knowledge on and, thus, are unaware of potential opportunities. The objective of this program activity is to encourage natural resource sector investment by either decreasing the risk of development or increasing knowledge on opportunities. This objective is achieved by providing funding and information on the factors that determine the potential economic viability of natural resources.

(i)    Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources

Natural resource development and military activities, and changes in the environment pose risks to human, natural resource and infrastructure health. Without the appropriate coordination for and knowledge on the management of these risks, the impacts would be severe. The objective of this program activity is to enable other government departments, communities and the private sector to manage these risks to human, natural resource and infrastructure. This objective is achieved by providing regulation and knowledge, fulfilling legislated and regulatory responsibilities, and ensuring capacity.

(j)    Market Access and Diversification

Canada’s natural resource sectors face two key barriers to market access and diversification: 1) trade and policy barriers and 2) lack of awareness of Canada’s natural resource products. The objectives of this program activity are to break down those barriers and support natural resource markets by making information available to Canadians, supporting negotiations to reduce trade barriers, and ensuring that regulations are up-to-date. This helps maintain natural resource sectors’ access to existing markets and increases their access to new market segments.

2. Methodology and significant assumptions

The Future-oriented Financial Statements has been prepared on the basis of the government priorities and the plans of the department as described in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The main assumptions are as follows:

  1. The department's activities are as reflected in the 2012-13 authorities and 2013-14 Main Estimates.
  2. Expenses and revenues, including the determination of amounts internal and external to the government, are based on historical experience, known information, and expert opinions of people with appropriate experience in the department’s activities. Where relevant, the general historical pattern is expected to continue.
  3. Allowances for uncollectibility are based on historical experience.  The general historical pattern is expected to continue.
  4. Estimated year end information for 2012-13 is used as the opening position for the 2013-14 planned results.

These assumptions are adopted as at December 31, 2012.

3.   Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

While every attempt has been made to forecast final results for the remainder of 2012-13 and for 2013-14, the actual results achieved for both years are likely to vary from the forecast information presented and this might be material.

In preparing these future-oriented financial statements, Natural Resources Canada has made estimates and assumptions and they may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Factors that could lead to material differences between the future-oriented and the historical financial statements include:

  1. The timing and amounts of acquisitions and disposals of property, plant and equipment may affect gains/losses and amortization expense. 
  2. Implementation of new collective agreements.     
  3. Economic conditions may affect both the amount of revenue earned and the collectability of the loan receivable.
  4. Interest rates in effect at the time of issue will affect the net present value of the liabilities.  
  5. Further changes to the operating budget through additional new initiatives or technical adjustments later in the year.

Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, Natural Resources Canada will not be updating the forecasts for any changes to appropriations or forecast financial information made in ensuing supplementary estimates. Variances will be explained in the Departmental Performance Report.

4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The future-oriented financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Treasury Board accounting policies and are consistent with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

Significant accounting policies are as follows:

(a)    Parliamentary authorities – Natural Resources Canada is financed by the Government of Canada through Parliamentary authorities. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the department do not parallel financial reporting according to generally accepted accounting principles since authorities are primarily based on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament. Note 5 provide a high-level reconciliation between the bases of reporting.

(b)   Consolidation – these future-oriented financial statements include the accounts of the Geomatics Canada Revolving Fund that is under the control of the Department. The accounts of this sub-entity have been consolidated with those of the Department and all inter-organizational balances and transactions have been eliminated. 

(c)    Net cash provided by Government – Natural Resources Canada operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada.  All cash received is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements are paid from the CRF.  The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions made by Natural Resources Canada within the federal Government.

(d)   Amounts due from/to the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the department is entitled to draw from the CRF without further Parliamentary expenditure authorities to discharge its liabilities.

(e)    Revenues - are recognized on an accrual basis:

  • Revenues from regulatory fees are recognized in the accounts based on the services provided in the year.
  • Funds received from external parties for specified purposes are recorded upon receipt as deferred revenue. These revenues are recognized in the period in which the related expenses are incurred.
  • Other revenues are accounted for in the period in which the underlying transaction or event occurred that gave rise to the revenue takes place.
  • Revenues that are non-respendable are not available to discharge the Department’s    liabilities.  While the Deputy Head is expected to maintain accounting control, he or she has no authority regarding the disposition of non-respendable revenues.  As a result, non-respendable revenues are considered to be earned on behalf of the Government of Canada and are therefore presented in reduction of the entity’s gross revenues.

(f)     Expenses - are recognized on an accrual basis:

  • Transfer payments are recorded as expenses when authorization for the payment exists and the recipient has met the eligibility criteria or the entitlements established for the transfer payment program. In situations where payments do not form part of an existing program, transfer payments are recorded as expenses when the Government announces a decision to make a non-recurring transfer, provided the enabling legislation or authorization for payment receives parliamentary approval prior to the completion of the financial statements. Transfer payments that become repayable as a result of conditions specified in the contribution agreement that have come into being are recorded as a reduction to transfer payment expense and as a receivable.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave are expensed as the benefits are earned by employees under their respective terms of employment. 
  • Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, employer’s contributions to the health and dental insurance plans, legal services and workers’ compensation are recorded as operating expenses at their estimated cost.

(g)    Employee future benefits  

  1. Pension benefits: Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer pension plan administered by the Government.  The Department's contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total departmental obligation to the Plan.  The Department’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.
  2.  Severance benefits:  Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment earn these benefits as services necessary to earn them are rendered. The obligation relating to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

(h)    Accounts and loans receivable are stated at the lower of cost and net recoverable value. However, when the terms of the loans are concessionary, such as those provided with a low or no interest clause, they are recorded at their estimated present value. A portion of the unamortized discount is recorded as revenue each year to reflect the change in the present value of the loans outstanding. Transfer payments that are unconditionally repayable are recognized as loans receivable. A valuation allowance is recorded for accounts and loans receivable where recovery is considered uncertain.

(i)      Repayable contributions are contributions where the recipient is expected to repay the amount advanced.  Depending on their nature, they are classified as either unconditionally repayable or conditionally repayable and are accounted for accordingly.

  1. Unconditionally repayable contributions are contributions that must be repaid without qualification.  Normally, these contributions are provided with a low or no interest clause. Due to their concessionary nature, they are recorded on the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position as loans at their estimated present value. A portion of this unamortized discount is recognized as revenue each year to reflect the change in the present value of the contributions outstanding.  An estimated allowance for uncollectibility is established where appropriate.
  2.  Conditionally repayable contributions are contributions that, all or part of which, become repayable, if conditions specified in the contribution agreement come into effect.  Accordingly, they are not recorded in the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position until such time as the conditions specified in the agreement come into effect, at which time they are recorded as a receivable and a reduction in transfer payment expenses. An estimated allowance for uncollectibility is established where appropriate.

(j)     Contingent liabilities – Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded.  If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the future-oriented financial statements. 

(k)   Environmental liabilities – Environmental liabilities reflect the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of environmentally contaminated sites.  Based on management’s best estimates, a liability is accrued and an expense recorded when the contamination occurs or when the department becomes aware of the contamination and is obligated, or likely to be obligated, to incur such costs.  If the likelihood of the department’s obligation to incur these costs is not determinable, or if an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the costs are disclosed as contingent liabilities in the notes to the future-oriented financial statements. 

(l)      Inventory – Inventory consists of parts, material and supplies held for future program delivery and not intended for resale. Inventory is valued at cost using the average cost method. If there is no longer any service potential, inventory is valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

(m)   Foreign currency transactions – Transactions involving foreign currencies are translated into Canadian dollar equivalents using rates of exchange in effect at the time of those transactions. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated into Canadian dollars using the rate of exchange in effect at year end. Gains and losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position and in Note 21 under Operating expenses – Other.

(n)    Tangible capital assets – All tangible capital assets and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $10,000 or more ($1,000 or more for the Geomatics Canada Revolving Fund) are recorded at their acquisition cost.  The department does not capitalize intangibles, works of art and historical treasures that have cultural, aesthetic or historical value, assets located on Indian Reserves and museum collections.Amortization of tangible capital assets is done on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

Asset Class Amortization period
Buildings 15 to 40 years
Machinery and equipment 5 to 15 years
Vehicles 3 to 10 years
Leasehold improvements Lesser of the remaining term of lease or useful life of the improvement
Leased tangible capital assets Over term of lease/useful life
Assets under construction Once in service, in accordance with asset class

Assets under construction are recorded in the applicable capital asset class in the year that they become available for use and are not amortized until they become available for use.

(o)   Measurement uncertainty – The preparation of these future-oriented financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the future-oriented financial statements. At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable.  The most significant items where estimates are used are contingent liabilities, environmental liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits, the useful life of tangible capital assets, and the allowance for doubtful accounts. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the future-oriented financial statements in the year they become known.

5. Parliamentary Authorities

The department receives most of its funding through expenditure authorities provided by Parliament. Items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years.  Accordingly, the Department has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis.  The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

Reconciliation of net cost of operations to requested authorities:
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 2,197,160 2,728,125
Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities:
Add (Less):
Refunds of prior years expenditures 7,837 11,460
Services provided without charge by other government departments (60,589) (52,752)
Adjustment for prepaid expenses (82,949) 1,534
Allowance for environmental liabilities 57,982 129,518
Amortization of tangible capital assets (17,270) (17,807)
Decrease in employee future benefits 5,633 3,362
Adjustments of prior year accounts payable 5,296 7,565
Amortization of unamortized discount loans 3,333 3,333
Adjustments of previous years inventory 91 86
Vacation pay and compensatory leave (2,329) 1,131
Other adjustments (31,687) (35,436)
  (114,652) 51,994
Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities:
Add (Less):
Acquisitions of tangible capital assets 31,038 31,228
Decrease  in lease obligations for tangible capital assets 2,593 2,519
Total items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities 33,631 33,747
Forecast authorities available 2,116,139 2,813,866

 

b)    Authorities Requested
  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(In thousands of dollars)
Vote 1 - Operating expenditures 825,706 834,173
Vote 5 - Capital expenditures 31,957 25,632
Vote 10 - Transfer payments 742,019 638,924
Statutory amounts 863,220 1,315,137
Less:
Lapsed - Operating (67,200)  
Lapsed - Capital (1,363)  
Lapsed - Transfer payment (278,200)  
Forecast authorities available 2,116,139 2,813,866

Authorities presented reflect current forecasts of statutory items, approved initiatives included and expected to be included in Estimates documents and, when reasonable estimates can be made, estimates of amounts to be allocated from Treasury Board central votes. 

6.  Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities

The following table presents details of the Department’s accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results     2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Accounts payable to other government departments and agencies 19,500 19,469
Accounts payable to external parties 422,039 558,355
  441,539 577,824
Accrued liabilities 5,100 5,100
Total 446,639 582,924

7.  Lease Obligation for Tangible Capital Assets

The department has entered into an agreement to lease a building under capital lease with a cost of $90.9 million and accumulated amortization of $ 8.7 million as at March 31, 2013. The obligations for the upcoming years include the following:

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results 2014
(in thousands of dollars)
2014 4,718  
2015 4,718 4,718
2016 4,718 4,718
2017 4,718 4,718
2018 and thereafter 87,830 87,830
Total future minimum lease payments 106,702 101,984
Less: imputed interest (3.45%) (32,690) (30,172)
Balance of obligation 74,012 71,812

8. Employee Future Benefits

(a)   Pension benefits

The department's employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government of Canada. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension Plans benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

Both the employees and the department contribute to the cost of the Plan. The forecast expenses are estimated at $ 60.6 million in 2012-13 and planned at $59.9 million in 2013-14, representing approximately 1.8 times the contributions of employees.

The department's responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the financial statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan's sponsor.

(b)   Severance benefits

The department provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future authorities. Information about the severance benefits, estimated as at the date of these statements, is as follows:

As part of the collective agreement negotiations with certain employee groups, and changes to conditions of employment for executives and certain non-represented employees, the accumulation of severance benefits under the employee severance pay program ceased for these employees commencing in 2012.  Employees subject to these changes have been given the option to be immediately paid the full or partial value of benefits earned to date or collect the full or remaining value of benefits on termination from the public service.  These changes have been reflected in the calculation of the outstanding severance benefit obligation.

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year 67,319 61,686
Expense for the year 5,633 3,361
Benefits paid during the year (11,266) (6,723)
Accrued benefit obligation, end of year 61,686 58,324

9. Other Liabilities

  Estimated Results
2013
Receipts Payments Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Guarantee deposits - Oil and gas 5,143 1,500 (2,231) 4,412
Shared-costs projects 4,545 2,000 (2,646) 3,899
Market development incentive payments – Alberta 4,640 600 (1,260) 3,980
Shared-costs agreements  - Research 4,672 - (663) 4,009
Total 19,000 4,100 (6,800) 16,300

Guarantee deposits – Oil and gas: This account was established to record securities in the form of cash, promissory notes, and bonds which are required to be issued to, and held by the Government of Canada pursuant to an Exploration License in accordance with section 24 of the Canada Petroleum Resources Act.  These securities are a performance guarantee that the agreed exploration will be performed in the manner and time frame specified.  Interest is not paid on these deposits.

Shared-cost projects -This account was established to facilitate the retention and disbursement of moneys received from private organizations and other governments for cost-sharing scientific projects.

Market development incentive payments – Alberta: This account records money received from the Government of Alberta, to encourage the expansion of natural gas market in Alberta and provinces to the East, in accordance with an agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of Alberta dated September 1, 1981 and pursuant to section 39 of the Energy Administration Act.  The original term of the agreement was from November 1, 1981 to January 31, 1987.  As a result of the Western Accord of March 25, 1985, payments from the Government of Alberta terminated as at April 30, 1986, however, payments are being made from the account for selected programs which encourage the use of natural gas for vehicles.

Shared-cost agreements – Research: This account was established to facilitate the retention and disbursement of moneys received from private industries and other governments for joint projects or shared-cost research agreements.

10.  Accounts Receivable and Advances

The following table presents details of the Department’s accounts receivable and advances balances.

   Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Receivables from external parties 118,156 149,676
Receivables from other federal government departments and agencies 7,500 7,500
Employee advances 85 85
  125,741 157,261
Less:  Allowance for doubtful accounts on external receivables (619) (796)
Gross accounts receivable and advances 125,122 156,465
Accounts receivable held on behalf of the Government (123,147) (153,995)
Net accounts receivable and advances 1,975 2,470

11. Loan Receivable

The following table presents details of the Department’s loan receivable balance.

   Estimated Results 2013 Planned Results     2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Loan to Nordion International Inc. 50,000 46,000
Unamortized discounts (10,000) (6,667)
Gross Loan balance - Nordion 40,000 39,333
Loan receivable held on behalf of Government (40,000) (39,333)
Loan balance - Nordion - -

Nordion International Inc. (loan)

Interest free loan agreement: to be repaid over 30 semi-annual payments commencing October 1, 2000; fully secured by a financial instrument in Canada’s name which guarantees that the loan will be repaid.  The balance remaining as of March 31, 2013 is estimated at $50 million.  Due to the concessionary terms of this loan, the estimated present value was $40 million as at March 31, 2013.

12.  Prepayments

The following table presents details of the Department’s prepayments.

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results     2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Prepayments 7,412 8,946

13. Inventory

The following table presents details of the inventory, measured at cost using the average cost method.

  Estimated Results 2013 Planned Results     2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Inventory held for consumption 1,727 1,641

14. Tangible Capital Assets

(In thousands of dollars)
  Planned Results 2014 Estimated Results
2013
Cost Accumulated Amortization Net Book Value Net Book Value
Capital Asset Class Opening Balance Acquisi-
tions
 Adjust-
ments
Disposal, write-off and others Closing Balance Opening Balance Amortiza-
tion
 Adjust-
ments
Disposal, write-off and others Closing Balance As at
31-Mar-14
As at
31-Mar-13
Land 11,127 - - - 11,127 - - - - - 11,127 11,127
Buildings 198,778 3,950  - - 202,728 140,171 3,746 - - 143,917 58,811 58,607
Machinery & Equipment 237,063 12,307 18,535 (5,000) 262,905 192,524 9,307 - (4,500) 197,331 65,574 44,539
Vehicles 11,786 738 - (500) 12,024 7,964 1,116 - (450) 8,630 3,394 3,822
Leasehold Improvements 371 - - - 371 - - -   - - 371 371
Leased Tangible Capital Assets 90,953 - - - 90,953 8,676 3,638 - - 12,314 78,639 82,277
Assets under Construction 35,441 14,233 (18,535) - 31,139 - - - - - 31,139 35,441
Total 585,519 31,228 - (5,500) 611,247 349,335 17,807 - (4,950) 362,192 249,055 236,184

Disposals of assets under construction represent assets that are put into use and transferred to other capital asset classes in the year as applicable. 

15.  Departmental net financial position

A portion of the Department’s net financial position is used for a specific purpose.  Related revenues and expenses are included in the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position. 

The Environmental Studies Research Fund account was established pursuant to subsection 76(1) of the Canada Petroleum Resources Act.  The purpose of the fund is to finance environmental and social studies pertaining to the manner in which, and the terms and conditions under which, exploration development and production activities on frontier land, authorized under this Act or any other Act of Parliament, should be conducted.  Legislation required that the revenues of these accounts to be earmarked and that related payments and expenses be charged against such revenues.  The transactions do not represent liabilities to third parties but are internally restricted for specified purposes. 

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Environmental Studies Research Fund – Restricted Departmental net financial position
Balance, beginning of year – Restricted 2,804 2,239
Revenues 135 135
Expenses (700) (700)
Balance, end of year – Restricted 2,239 1,674
Unrestricted Departmental net financial position (1,003,520) (848,856)
Departmental net financial position – End of year (1,005,759) (850,530)

16.  Contractual Obligations

The nature of the department’s activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby the department will be obligated to make future payments when the services/goods are received.  Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

  2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 and thereafter TOTAL
(In thousands of dollars)
Transfer payments 323,280 298,401 257,274 165,210 453,687 1,497,852

17.  Contingent Liabilities

Contingent liabilities arise in the normal course of operations and their ultimate disposition is unknown. They are grouped into two categories as follows:

(a)   Contaminated sites

Liabilities are accrued to record the estimated costs related to the management and remediation of contaminated sites where the department is obligated or likely to be obligated to incur such costs. As at the date of the preparation of these future-oriented financial statements, the department had identified approximately 6 sites where such action is possible and for which a liability of $1,027 million in 2012-13 has been recorded.  Additional new sites, changes in the remediation approach or material changes in amounts accrued or not accrued are not forecasted for the future years presented in these statements.  However, the department’s ongoing efforts to assess contaminated sites may result in additional environmental liabilities related to newly identified sites, or changes in the assessments or intended use of existing sites; these liabilities will be accrued by the department in the year in which they become likely and can be reasonably estimated.

(b)   Claims and litigation

Claims have been made against the department in the normal course of operations. These claims include items with pleading amounts and others for which no amount is specified. Based on the Department’s assessment, legal proceedings for claims estimated at $17.4 million were pending at March 31, 2012. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  To the extent that future events is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the financial statements.

18.   Contingent Recoveries

Natural Resources Canada issues conditionally repayable contributions that become repayable if conditions specified in the contribution agreement come into effect. 

Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader- Canada sold its interests in the Lloydminster Bi-Provincial Upgrader to Husky Oil in 1995.  The terms of sale included an upside interest provision whereby Canada would be eligible to receive additional payments for a period of up to 20 years if the differential between light and heavy crude oil reached a certain threshold.  As a result of the increase in oil prices since the date of sale, the upside interest provision was triggered and eligible payments to Canada have increased. Canada's eligibility for upside interest payments ends in 2015.

Vancouver Island Pipeline Contribution- Canada provided $50 million in support of the construction of Vancouver Island Pipeline in the early 1990's.  This support was provided in the form of a repayable contribution.  Repayment was contingent upon the proponent meeting certain financial conditions.  Full repayment is expected to be received by 2014.

The Ethanol Expansion Program (EBP) was launched in August 2003 with a budget of $100 million, as part of the budget 2003 Climate Change measures. The purpose of the EBP was to contribute to the expansion of ethanol production and use in Canada and the reduction of transportation greenhouse gas emissions. Incentives were provided to enable the construction of new ethanol facilities or the expansion of existing ones. The support was provided in the form of repayable contributions. Repayments are to be made over a seven year period or until Canada has received repayments totaling an amount equal to the contribution, whichever comes first. Repayment is contingent upon the proponents meeting certain financial conditions. The final repayment reports will be received in 2017.

Other contingent recoveries relate to agreements entered into with proponents for early stage research and development (R&D) activities.  Recoveries are contingent upon the successful commercialization of products generated by the R&D activities.

The department has estimated the contingent recoverable amounts as $28.1 million.  Contingent recoveries are not recorded in the financial statements. 

19.  Related Party Transactions

The department is related, as a result of common ownership, to all Government of Canada departments, agencies, and Crown corporations.  The department enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

(a)  Common services provided without charge by other government departments

During the year the Department receives services without charge from certain common service organizations, related to accommodation, legal services, the employer's contribution to the health and dental insurance plans and workers' compensation coverage. These services provided without charge have been recorded in the department's Future-oriented Statement of Operations as follows:

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans 41,825 34,060
Accommodation 17,307 17,332
Legal services 1,213 1,128
Workers’ compensation 244 232
Total 60,589 52,752

The Government has centralized some of its administrative activities for efficiency and cost-effectiveness purposes and economic delivery of programs to the public. As a result, the Government uses central agencies and common service organizations so that one department performs services for all other departments and agencies without charge. The costs of these services, such as the payroll and cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and audit services provided by the Office of the Auditor General, are not included in the Department's Future-oriented Financial Statements.

(b)   Other transactions with related parties:

  Estimated Results
2013
Planned Results
2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Accounts receivable - Other government departments and agencies 7,500 7,500
Accounts payable - Other government departments and agencies 19,500 19,469
Expenses - Other government departments and agencies 119,014 129,550
Revenues - Other government departments and agencies 3,792 4,854

Expenses and revenues disclosed in (b) exclude common services provided without charge, which is already disclosed in (a).

20. Segmented Information

       (In thousands of dollars)

  Statutory Programs - Atlantic Offshore Energy-efficient Practices and Lower-carbon Energy Sources Internal Services Responsible Natural Resources Management Technology Innovation Innovation for New Products and Processes Landmass Information Investment in natural Resources Sectors Protection for Canadians and Natural Resources Market Access and Diversification Total Planned Results
2014
Total Estimated Results
2013
Expenses
Transfer Payments
Industry 243,338 99,015 172 1,926 14,367 15,614 166 1,396 94 5,360 381,448 253,104
International 854 349 1 7 50     55 1 5 - 19 1,341 889
Non-profit organization 38,451 15,646 27 304 2,270 2,467 26 221 15 847 60,274 39,994
Other levels of government 831,482 338,331 586  6,582 49,091 53,353 567 4,770 322 18,316 1,303,400 864,850
Individuals 94,177 38,321 66 745 5,561 6,043 64 540 36 2,075 147,628 97,956
Total transfer payments 1,208,302 491,662 852  9,564 71,339 77,532 824 6,932 467 26,617 1,894,091 1,256,793
Operating expenses
Salaries and employee benefits - 35,105 108,673 32,372 68,881 31,884 39,641 42,356 51,089 23,469 433,470 461,095
Environmental expenses - - (129,518) - - - - - - - (129,518) (57,982)
Information - 366 2,282 3,400 1,205 171 253 472 230 171 8,550 7,083
Professional and special services - 13,170 95,810 176,691 43,380 6,137 16,295 19,532 8,250 6,153 385,418 319,594
Rentals - 2,161 10,460 6,426 5,020 1,703 2,121 2,634 2,653 1,326 34,504 31,533
Transportation - 1,583 10,713 18,505 5,214 738 1,597 2,220 992 740 42,302 35,047
Utilities, material and supplies - 1,037 6,535 9,358 3,414 484 680 1,325 650 485 23,968 19,877
Purchased repairs and upkeep - 303 1,879 2,759 999 141 202 389 190 141  7,003 5,802
Acquisitions - 1,514 11,493 20,545 7,331 723 12,691 2,245 1,447 2,468 60,457 59,446
Amortization - - 17,807 - - - - - - - 17,807 17,270
Other - 369 (20,780) 3,680 1,210 174 294 489 235 172 (14,157) 74,733
Total operating expenses - 55,608 115,354 273,736 136,654 42,155 73,774 71,662 65,736 35,125 869,804 973,498
Total expenses 1,208,302 547,270 116,206 283,300 207,993 119,687 74,598 78,594 66,203 61,742 2,763,895 2,230,291
Revenues
Rights and privileges 1,051,049 71 - 129 3,008 227 245 98 823 278,008 1,333,658 1,037,285
Revenue from services of a non-regulatory nature - 440 375 802 16,926 1,404 281 610 5,099 15 25,952 23,865
Miscellaneous revenue - 13 3,851 23 482 40 8 17 145 - 4,579 4,476
Proceeds from sales of goods and information products - 52 - 94 1,982 164 33 71 597 2 2,995 2,783
Revenue from services of a regulatory nature - - - - - - 1,968 - - - 1,968 1,968
Revenue earned on behalf of Government (1,051,049) - (3,851) - (276) - (200) - - (278,006) (1,333,382) (1,037,246)
Total revenues - 576 375 1,048 22,122 1,835 2,335 796 6,664 19 35,770 33,131
Net cost from continuing operations 1,208,302 546,694 115,831 282,252 185,871 117,852 72,263 77,798 59,539 61,723 2,728,125 2,197,160

21.  Accounting Change

The Department has adopted the Public Sector Accounting Board Standard 3410-Transfer Payments which became effective April 1, 2012 and had to be applied prospectively.  This resulted in expensing prepaid transfer payments in the amount of $85 million in 2012-2013.

 
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