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Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Mineral and Metal Markets Access and Development

Description

Canadian producers of minerals and metals require access to export markets since domestic production exceeds domestic demand for many commodities. However, tariffs and non-tariff barriers can constrain exports, as can policies and measures that reduce demand for minerals, metals and products containing metals, and certification schemes that discriminate against Canadian producers. Through this Sub-program, NRCan administers the Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act and regulations that implement Canada’s international obligations under the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, ensuring market access for Canadian diamond producers and users.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)

1,601,063

1,464,976

(136,087)

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)

4

9

5

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Rough diamond market access is supported through the efficient implementation of Canada’s international obligations under the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme

Percentage of Kimberley Process export certificates issued within one business day of the receipt of a completed and valid application

97%

Results: 100%

  • The highest possible service standard was maintained through fast and reliable issuance of export certificates.
  • Overall costs related to administering the Export Import Rough Diamonds Act and managing the Kimberley Process program are in line with previous years.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Forest Products Market Access and Development

Description

Canada's forest sector has traditionally relied heavily on exports of wood for residential construction in the United States. To maximize value from its resource, Canada must develop new forest products and end-uses in existing markets, and diversify its geographical markets. To do so, it must reduce barriers to market access posed by trade restrictions, tariffs, regulations and misconceptions of the environmental record of Canada's forest sector and its products. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides financial contributions to Canadian forest industry associations to support initiatives to expand exports to international markets and increase the use of wood in North American non-residential construction. It also provides financial contributions and science-based information to industry partners to support the development and dissemination of information products that promote the environmental reputation of Canada's forest sector in international markets. Also, it provides expertise to other federal departments in support of Canada's international negotiating positions on trade and environmental issues. This Sub-program includes two programs: Expanding Market OpportunitiesFootnote 1 and Implementation of the International Climate Change Strategy and continued engagement and alignment with the U.S., including the Clean Energy Dialogue.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)

2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)

22,403,001

26,698,913

4,295,912

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference (actual minus planned)

67

69

2

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Forest industry has increased sales of Canadian wood products in international markets

Diversity of markets for Canadian wood products

Measure: Using the change in the values of the Herfindahl Index to measure Canada’s success in diversifying its wood product exports away from one core market (i.e., the United States) and towards offshore markets over time

Favourable yearly average (trending towards ‘0’ over the five-year period) against 2011 base yearFootnote ii value of 0.397

The closer the value is to 0, the more a country (i.e. Canada) diversified its exports away from dependency on one key market

Results: 0.556

The Herfindahl index value for 2015 is 0.556, which suggests that markets were less diversified than they were in 2011.

Dollar value of wood product sales in targeted offshore markets (China, Korea, Japan and Europe (EU 27)) and other new emerging markets (e.g., India, Middle East)

10% increase over 2011 base yearFootnote iii value of $3.5 billion for targeted offshore markets and $99.3 million for new emerging markets

Results:

7.3 % (existing markets)

-14.6 % (new emerging markets)

In 2015-16, wood product exports to existing markets such as China, Korea, Japan and EU-27 increased 7.3% above the 2011 base value of $3.5 billion.

The value of wood product exports to new emerging markets, such as India and the Middle East, were 14.6% below the 2011 base year value of $99.3 million.

Forest industry has increased sales of Canadian wood products in new market segments

Dollar value of wood products used in non-residential construction projects built with wood as opposed to traditional means (Canada and US)

10% increase over 2011 base yearFootnote iv value of $130.3 million

Results: 67.7 % increase

Use of wood products in non-residential construction projects in Canada and the US increased 67.7% over the 2011 base year value of $130.3 million.

Stakeholders in targeted international markets have positive perception of Canadian forest practices and products

Percentage of targeted stakeholders who have a positive perception of Canadian forest practices and products

Majority (51%) of targeted stakeholders have positive perceptions

Results: Achieved

64% of targeted stakeholders have positive perceptions of Canadian forest practices and products.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Energy Market Regulation and Information

Description

Canada realizes many benefits as a result of robust energy markets and strong trade in energy resources. Ensuring these benefits continue to contribute to the broader economy requires regular assessment, analysis and monitoring of Canadian energy resources, including infrastructure and regulations, as well as early engagement with Indigenous Peoples. Through this Sub-program, NRCan aims to foster a competitive Canadian energy sector by working with provinces, territories, and other stakeholders, and internationally, to articulate Canada's approach to the management of energy resources. It assesses and updates (when necessary) federal energy legislation and regulations and policies relating to such areas as offshore oil and gas, pipelines, and nuclear; engages domestically and internationally on energy issues; and provides Canadians with information on energy markets. NRCan engages west coast Indigenous communities on issues related to energy infrastructure development and coordinates the activities across multiple Government of Canada departments to increase Indigenous involvement in this development.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

24,680,942

47,763,184

23,082,242

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

168

176

8

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Actions are taken domestically and internationally to diversify Canada’s energy markets

The number of high-level (ADM and above) federal-provincial-territorial engagements and international bilateral and multilateral engagements with countries and organizations in key market regions (i.e. Asia-Pacific, US/Americas and Europe)

15 per year

Results: 24

24 high-level (ADM and above) federal-provincial-territorial engagements and international bilateral and multilateral engagements with countries and organizations were undertaken in key market regions (i.e. Asia-Pacific, US/Americas and Europe).

Actions taken to identify and address non-regulatory issues that are of concern to Aboriginal communities that could be impacted by the development of West Coast energy infrastructure development

Percentage of non-regulatory issues identified across BC First Nations potentially impacted by energy infrastructure development that are being (or have been) addressed through federal actions

30%

Results: 37.6%

Through its engagement efforts, MPMO-West has to date identified roughly 220 community priorities and issues, and addressed 37.6% in collaboration with partner departments.

The Government of Canada's regulatory and legislative frameworks governing Canada’s energy resources (e.g., pipelines, offshore oil and gas) is renewed and continuously improved

Number of assessments and/or updates to energy regulations or legislation and/or Canada's energy regulatory or legislative frameworks

2 per year

Results: 3

NRCan provided policy support related to updates to three energy regulations, and worked to strengthen the pipeline safety regime, the national nuclear liability regime and offshore regulatory initiatives.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Mining Innovation

Description

Increased innovation is needed to improve the productivity and competitiveness of Canadian mines. However, declining university enrolment in mining-related fields and changes in the industry are affecting Canada's capacity for mining innovation. Through this Sub-program, NRCan encourages mining innovation by using a collaborative approach to reduce financial risks for industry partners, and ensuring that program priorities are aligned with business needs. NRCan also conducts coordinated research to address priorities identified by stakeholders, such as technologies to safely and profitably develop and operate deeper mines, and to process ores, concentrates and recyclable materials that cannot be processed with commercially available technologies. As well, it creates opportunities to develop the next generation of professionals, and supplies certified reference materials to service providers and industry analytical laboratories, which rely on such reference materials to ensure the quality of data that inform mineral investment decisions, determine product value, drive process improvement, and improve confidence in environmental monitoring.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

2,128,292

7,569,271

5,440,979

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

30

41

11

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Technology developers increase demonstration of innovative mining and processing technologies

Number of demonstration projects

2 over 5 years by March 31, 2017

Results: On-track

NRCan continued its applied research and development with industry to enhance the productivity and improve the competitiveness of Canadian mines. The department is on track to complete the second demonstration project to replace steel wire ropes with synthetic ropes for hoisting in mine operations. NRCan’s CanmetMINING laboratory is also finalizing the protocol to start an industrial in-situ testing at a Canadian mine site.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Forest Sector Innovation

Description

Canada’s forest sector has experienced a decrease in its market share as a result of changing global and regional demand and increasing competition. To regain its competitive position and compete profitably in a wider array of markets, the sector must focus on innovation (i.e., research, development and deployment) and move towards a more diversified and innovative mix of higher-value specialized products, processes and technologies. Through a forest sector innovation system sector partners can align and pursue common innovation priorities. Through this Sub-program, NRCan brings together various players in the forest sector innovation system – governments, industry, communities (Indigenous and non-Indigenous), and research institutions – to focus on collectively identifying, funding and delivering on the innovation priorities of the sector. NRCan also conducts research with, and provides financial contributions to, FPInnovations, other forest sector research partners, and eligible forest product companies to research, develop and deploy new products, processes and technologies. This Sub-program includes the Canadian Regulatory System for Biotechnology, the Forest Innovation Program, the Forest Research Institutes Initiative, the Investments in Forest Industry Transformation and the Aboriginal Forestry Initiative (AFI).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

72,816,903

75,568,466

2,751,563

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

184

200

16

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Indigenous communities have the knowledge needed to take advantage of emerging economic development opportunities

Number of new economic development projects facilitated, brokered, and/or developed with NRCan knowledge and funding

8 new projects facilitated, brokered, and/or developed with NRCan knowledge and funding

Results: 12

12 new economic development projects in Indigenous communities, were facilitated, brokered and/or developed through the AFI with NRCan knowledge and funding.

Forest sector innovation is accelerated by the endorsement of an annual research plan by the forest sector innovation system

Annual research plan endorsed by the FPInnovations National Research Advisory Committee (NRAC)

1 endorsed research plan

Results: 1

 

The FPInnovations research plan for 2015-16 was approved by the organisation’s National Research Advisory Committee

NRCan, industry, provinces and academia develop new technologies which lead to higher-value Canadian forest products and processes to create a better competitive position for the Canadian forest sector

Number of new higher-value Canadian forest products or processes that are derived from new technologies developed

10 by
March 31, 2017

Results: 9

Nine higher-value Canadian forest products or processes derived from new technologies developed

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Geospatial Innovation

Description

Natural resource sectors, like other public and private sectors, rely on location-based information to make production and business decisions. This Sub-program supports federal, provincial, territorial, and private sector partnerships and collaboration to deliver cost-effective geospatial science, technology, data, policy and applications solutions that are built once and used many times across economic, social and environmental sectors. This Sub-program includes the GeoConnections program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

8,492,806

10,237,496

1,744,690

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

35

72

37

Performance Results

Expected Result

Performance Indicator

Target

Actual Results

Interoperability of geospatial data

Number of public or private sector organizations adopting recognizable standards, policies, tools and frameworks in value-added applications to support their business objectives

10 per year

Results: 10+

Ten federal departments adopted the Federal Geospatial Platform to manage geospatial information assets in a more efficient and coordinated way by using a common platform of technical infrastructure, policies, standards and governance.

Additional partnerships were established domestically and internationally with private sector and government organizations to implement the new business model for NRCan’s satellite station facilities.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Mineral Investment

Description

Canada must compete for mineral investment because capital is mobile and flows to countries that offer attractive, risk-adjusted returns for investors. Mineral exploration creates opportunities for Canadians and can lead to increasing investments and revenue from resources over the medium term. Governments need specific information on mineral exploration and mine development to manage policies that affect mineral investment. Through this Sub-program, NRCan collects and analyses socioeconomic data on mineral exploration, deposit appraisal and mine complex development expenditures, physical output from production facilities, and the value of mineral production as well as the dissemination of trade data. NRCan prepares tax rulings for provisions of the Income Tax Act administered by the Minister, and provides expertise, analysis and support to other departments with a lead responsibility for tax and investment policies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

10,124,002

10,596,051

472,049

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

103

91

(12)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Industry decision-makers and potential investors are provided with timely information on mineral socio-economic data

Number of data sets released

5 per year

Results: 5 data sets

NRCan met the target for this sub-program. Data sets on mineral socio-economic information were released in a timely manner on the NRCan website for industry decision-makers and potential investors including:

  1. Production of Canada's Leading Minerals
  2. Mineral Trade Statistics
  3. Mineral Industry Statistics – Production (annual)
  4. Mineral Production Statistics (preliminary)
  5. Mineral Exploration statistics (preliminary and annual)

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Targeted GeoscienceFootnote 1 Initiative

Description

Mineral resources are one of the principal economic drivers in many rural and remote Canadian communities. New geoscience knowledge and techniques are required to help industry explore more effectively for undiscovered mineral resources in existing and emerging mining areas. Through this Sub-program, NRCan develops an understanding of entire mineral systems and provides industry with innovative ways for deep exploration, thereby maximizing yield. It targets selected mineral districts across Canada to provide the best examples of Canada's major ore systems, and to develop optimal predictive models and techniques for deep exploration. This helps natural resource sectors access viable investment opportunities. This Sub-program includes the Targeted Geoscience Initiative program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

5,181,962

8,112,499

2,930,537

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

47

50

3

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Industry applies NRCan knowledge and/or techniques, enabling more effective exploration for as-yet undiscovered resources

Number of emerging public geoscience knowledge or methodologies relevant to discovery of new mineral resources that have been adopted in industry exploration programs

5 per year

Results: 5

In 2015-16, five mining companies self-identified that they used new TGI knowledge in their exploration program during 2015 along with anecdotal evidence that the exploration industry continues to use and expand upon the 45 TGI innovations identified in an independent report from 2014.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Geo-MappingFootnote 2 for Energy and Minerals

Description

Public geoscience information stimulates industry investment, which might not otherwise occur given the level of uncertainty about exploration opportunities. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides modern geological knowledge of the northern landmass to the private sector to guide exploration investment in the North. It focuses on characterizing the regional geological context to establish whether areas have a high or low likelihood of resource potential. In addition to reducing risk and stimulating exploration investments by industry, this same geological knowledge also informs Northerners' land-use decisions so that they can undertake responsible resource development that does not compromise conservation efforts or other land-use considerations. Through this Sub-program, NRCan promotes exploration and long-term sustainable development for vast and untapped resources in the North. This Sub-program includes the Geo-Mapping for Energy and Minerals program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

34,833,259

38,009,167

3,175,908

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

169

188

19

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Governments and industry have increased geoscience information on Canada's North to help guide development decisions

Percentage of new publication releases accessed (new releases are those released and accessed within a 12-month period)

75%

Results: 81%

Over 80% of the publications of the Geo-Mapping for Energy and Minerals program released online in fiscal year 2015-16 were accessed that same year.

Number of unique NRCan products accessed (e.g., downloaded) annually on Northern geoscience information

50 per year

Results: 140

140 maps, technical reports, and open files from 17 research activities of the Geo-Mapping for Energy and Minerals program were publically released and accessed online in fiscal year 2015-16.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: New Energy Supply

Description

Given increased energy use and global decline in conventional energy resources, the development of new sources of energy is important in addressing Canada's long-term energy requirements. These new sources will support the energy supply mix, which is an important part of sustainable long-term economic growth in Canada. However, Canada's private sector currently lacks geoscience information to enable it to make the best investment decisions. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides the public and private energy sector with strategic assessments, methodologies and information required to make investment decisions on unconventional (shale oil and shale gas) and northern and offshore energy resources, which could increase natural resource investment and support a sustainable energy mix to meet Canada’s future energy demands.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

4,090,891

7,582,980

3,492,089 

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

36

42

6

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Public and private sectors access knowledge products supporting assessment and investment decision-making on new energy exploration basins

Number of unique reports, such as strategic assessments, accessed (e.g., downloaded) annually by stakeholders

25 per year

Results: 33

Eighteen of these items were peer-reviewed publications and other reports and conference proceedings.

Sub-Program 1.3.5: Major Projects Management Office Initiative

Description

Major resource projects represent significant economic investments, creating thousands of jobs and providing important economic development opportunities for communities across Canada. As much as $650 billion is expected to be invested in more than 600 major resource projects across Canada over the next 10 years. Efficient and effective federal project reviews facilitate these investments and capitalize on the potential to stimulate jobs and growth through responsible resource development, while also maintaining strong environmental protection. The objective of the Major Projects Management Office Initiative is to support timely and effective project reviews and to lead government-wide efforts to modernize the regulatory system for major projects. This includes efforts to improve the alignment of federal and provincial regulatory processes and to ensure effective and meaningful consultation with Indigenous peoples.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

0

3,969,465

3,969,465

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

0

28

28

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Timely EA and regulatory decisions for major projects

Timeliness: Percentage of major project EAs that meet legislated timeliness (CEAA, NEB, CNSC reviews)

100% of EAs meet legislated timelines

Results: Achieved

As of March 31, 2016, all 47 projects that completed the environment assessment process under the MPMO Initiative met the target. The average federal time to complete an environmental assessment was 15.6 months.

Integrated and robust advice supports improvements to the major project review process

MPMO Deputies are satisfied or very satisfied with how advice is advanced on horizontal issues

70% of MPMO DMs are satisfied or very satisfied with how advice is advanced on horizontal issues

Results: Achieved

As of March 31, 2016, 80% of MPMO DMs were satisfied or very satisfied with how advice was advanced on horizontal issues. Specifically, DMs or their delegates consistently noted that the decision-making structure supporting the MPMO Initiative was critical to organizing consistent, whole of government advice to an incoming government.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Renewable Energy Deployment

Description

Canada has abundant renewable energy resources. Deployment of renewable energy technologies will diversify Canada’s energy mix and, in the long term, decrease Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions. Through this Sub-program, NRCan is developing a supportive policy framework for administering marine renewable energy measures in the federal offshore through the Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures program. NRCan also supports production from renewable energy projects already deployed through the ecoENERGY for Renewable Power and Wind Power Production Incentive programs. In addition, NRCan will continue to monitor the Federal Loan Guarantee for the Lower Churchill Hydroelectricity Projects.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

156,756,416

142,620,429

(14,135,987)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

6

7

1

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Renewable electricity is produced by the projects supported by NRCan programs

Number of terawatt-hours (TWh) of renewable electricity produced

15.7 TWh

Results: 15.0 TWh

As of March 31, 2016, 18 of 22 projects under the Wind Power Production Incentive program had completed their contribution agreements. These projects remain in operation and are continuing to produce clean electricity; however, the program no longer tracks this electricity production (which accounts for the discrepancy of 0.7TWha).

Federal Government decision makers have information on policy framework for administering marine renewable energy in federal offshore

Production of policy framework

Policy framework

Results: Achieved

In 2015-16, NRCan completed the framework for administering marine renewable energy in federal offshore, which was developed after extensive consultations with provinces and key stakeholders.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Support for Clean Energy Decision-Making

Description

Canada requires an understanding of how clean energy production options can fit within the broader energy system. Public and federal government decision-makers need information to evaluate the effectiveness of solutions to the domestic and international environmental impacts of energy development. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides tools, information and analysis to federal decision makers and the Canadian public regarding energy-related environmental issues (particularly climate change) and clean energy technologies, and supports Canada's international climate change negotiators. This Sub-program includes activities under three Clean Air Agenda programs: the Clean Energy Policy program, the International Negotiations program, and the Clean Energy Dialogue.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,825,600

3,216,411

(609,189)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

21

25

4

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Canadian international climate change objectives are advanced in international meetings

Percentage of Canadian objectives reflected each year in the outcomes of relevant international meetings (e.g., UNFCCC)

80%

Results: 80%

At least 80% of Canadian objectives were reflected in the outcomes of relevant international meetings and all outcomes were within the parameters of the limits and priorities of Canadian positions.

The public and federal government decision-makers have access to information that supports decisions on climate change and clean energy issues

Number of new or updated information products available to the public that aim to advance knowledge of Canada's energy resources and environmental impacts

10

Results: 12

NRCan produced 12 new or updated information products.

Provision of information products (e.g., advice and analysis) to federal decision-makers regarding clean energy and environmental issues in response to requests

95% of requests fulfilled

Results: 95%

95% of requests for information and analysis were fulfilled.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Alternative Transportation Fuels

Description

Alternative fuels (e.g., natural gas, ethanol, biodiesel) have lower carbon content and thus emit fewer greenhouse gases than conventional transportation fuels, such as gasoline and diesel. However, fuel producers and users, vehicle and equipment manufacturers, and policy makers can face barriers to the production and use of alternative transportation fuels. These barriers include lack of market capacity to produce alternative fuels; lack of familiarity by end-users and other stakeholders of the benefits of alternative fuel use; and lack of codes and standards governing alternative vehicles and infrastructure. Through this Sub-program, NRCan is addressing these barriers by increasing production capacity, designing and developing education and outreach materials, and facilitating the design, development and updating of codes and standards. This Sub-program includes the following programs: ecoENERGY for Biofuels and ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

51,010,440

18,080,991

(32,929,449)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

26

20

(6)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Fuel producers have the capacity to produce renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel

Number of litres of renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel that industry has the capacity to produce

Sustain the built production capacity level of December 2012: 1,881 million litres of renewable alternative to gasoline and 555 million litres of renewable to diesel

Results:

145 million litres of renewable alternative to gasoline (ethanol) and 96 million litres of renewable alternative to diesel (biodiesel)

On March 31, 2016, the production capacity for seven contribution agreements (two ethanol and five biodiesel) was 145 million litres/year of renewable alternatives to gasoline (ethanol) and 96 million litres of renewable alternatives to diesel (biodiesel).

Stakeholders (policy makers, end-users, alternative and conventional fuel producers, and vehicle and equipment manufacturers) have increased knowledge of alternative fuel pathways

Percentage of survey respondents reporting increased knowledge of alternative fuel pathways

80%

Results: 80%

80% of survey respondents reported increased knowledge of alternative fuel pathways.

Standards community has increased ability to develop and update codes and standards related to alternative transportation fuels

Number of codes and standards committees actively working on developing and updating the codes and standards

2 by March 31, 2016

Results: Exceeded

NRCan supported 4 technical committees responsible for developing codes and standards for natural gas refueling stations and vehicles.

Sub-Program 2.1.4: Energy Efficiency

Description

Increasing energy efficiency reduces greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental impacts (e.g., those impacting air quality). Many Canadian energy users are unaware of the benefits of adopting energy-efficient technologies and practices. As well, regulations, codes and standards require ongoing stringency improvements because the energy efficiency of housing, buildings, and energy-using products is continually improving. Through this Sub-program, NRCan encourages the adoption of energy-efficient technologies and practices through labelling, information and training, and by making the stock of housing, buildings and energy-using products more efficient through regulation, codes, standards and energy benchmarking activities. It also makes industrial and vehicle operations more energy efficient through energy management standards, practices and training. This Sub-program includes the ecoENERGY Efficiency program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

42,386,005

47,094,592

4,708,587

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

226

212

(14)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Canadians adopt NRCan-targeted energy efficient products and practices

Number of jurisdictions adopting the 2011 National Energy Code for Buildings (NECB)

4-6 provinces and territories adopting NECB or equivalent

Results: Achieved

Five provinces and two cities adopted the NECB or equivalent

Number of provincial, territorial and/or utility programs using NRCan-developed housing standards and systems

12 regional programs using NRCan-developed housing standards and systems

Results: Exceeded

Over 50 provincial, territorial and/or utility programs used NRCan-developed housing standards and systems

Increased energy efficiency resulting from NRCan programs

Petajoules of energy saved through energy efficiency programming

36-44 petajoules

Results: Exceeded

NRCan programs resulted in 52 petajoules of energy saved.
 

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Materials for Energy

Description

Opportunities exist to increase the energy efficiency of Canadian industry through the use of innovative materials technology in such applications as clean power generation, reliable transportation of fossil fuels, and fuel-efficient vehicles. Through this Sub-program, NRCan performs applied research and development that delivers materials and materials-processing innovations, enabling clean energy production, safe and reliable energy distribution, and more efficient use of energy in areas such as transportation, buildings and industry.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,867,568

10,653,846

6,786,278

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

85

64

(21)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Advanced materials technologies for new energy efficient vehicle designs are developed for industry

Number of advanced materials technologies to which NRCan contributed that have an impact on industry stakeholders products or decision making in the manufacture of energy efficient vehicles produced in North America

2 over 3 years

Results: On-track

Since 2015, NRCan has contributed to one advanced materials technology that enables greater vehicle efficiency and thus decreases the emission of greenhouse gases. These efforts have led to the development of medium carbon stainless steels for automotive exhaust components.

New materials technologies in clean power generation and safe and reliable energy distribution are developed for industry

Number of innovative materials technologies developed, contributed to, or validated by NRCan for use in power generation systems powered by nuclear, fossil or renewable energy

2 over 3 years

Results: On-track

To date, two innovative materials technologies were developed or validated by NRCan for use in power generation systems (e.g., nano silicon carbide/Ni composite coating).

New materials technology or standards to transport fossil fuels effectively (safely and efficiently) are developed for industry

Number of proposed projects to transport fossil fuels more effectively (safely and efficiently) using new materials technologies or standards developed or validated by NRCan

3 over 5 years

Results: On-track

Two new technologies or standards has been developed or validated by NRCan to support the effective transport of fossil fuels including a new pipeline fracture toughness test method. 

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Green Mining

Description

The development and commercialization of technologies to reduce the impacts of mining and processing entail significant financial, market and technical risk. Through this Sub-program, NRCan develops and demonstrates innovative mining technologies and practices that eliminate or reduce environmental impacts and financial risks. These technologies and practices also expand domestic and international business opportunities for mining companies, technology developers and consultants. NRCan identifies business needs, technology gaps and priorities with input from the Canada Mining Innovation Council and an advisory committee. Applied research aims to reduce land disturbance; water, energy and hazardous chemical use; waste volumes; and releases to the environment; and to accelerate site restoration. In addition, findings contribute to the scientific, technological and socioeconomic basis for updating federal, provincial and territorial mining and environmental regulations and policies, and inform policy priorities in other countries that drive demand for technologies and services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

7,367,535

10,864,256

3,496,721

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

87

75

(12)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Technology developers increase demonstration of environmental technologies

Number of demonstration projects

2 over 5 years

Results: On-track

NRCan finalized one demonstration project that maps recoverable waste energy in the grinding circuit of rocks.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Clean Energy Science and Technology

Description

New technologies help improve the environmental impacts of energy production and use. Through this Sub-program, NRCan collaborates with academia, industry and the public sector to research, develop and demonstrate innovative solutions to environmental challenges in the energy sector. The objective is for academia, industry, and the public sector to lay the foundation for the next generation of clean energy technologies and practices to reduce impacts on Canada's air, land and water. Through this Sub-program, NRCan funds, creates and advances new energy knowledge and technologies. This Sub-program includes the following programs: Clean Energy Fund, ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative, Sustainable Development Canada’s (SDTC) Sustainable Development Tech Fund, SDTC's NextGen Biofuels Fund, Science and Technology Internship Program and Isotope Technology Acceleration Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

115,236,975

122,102,305

6,865,330

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

444

526

82

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Academia, industry and the public sector pursue clean energy S&T that reduces environmental impacts

Ratio of NRCan program investments in clean energy S&T to leveraged funding from partners

1:1 ratio

Results: 1:1.1

In 2015-16, for every dollar spent by NRCan on investments in clean energy S&T, $1.10 was leveraged from partners.

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Forest Ecosystems Science and Application

Description

Forests are susceptible to climate-related changes, natural (disease) and man-made influences (harvesting, land-use changes). Sustainable development of Canada’s forests requires the understanding, monitoring and assessment of forest ecosystems and their health. Science and knowledge of changing forest dynamics influence decision-making, professional practice, Canada's international reputation and market access to forest-related products. The objective of this Sub-program is to increase the overall scientific knowledge of forest ecosystems and to support knowledge-based sustainable forest management policies and practices. Through this Sub-program, NRCan conducts research, national assessments and monitoring to develop scientific knowledge of Canada's forest ecosystems. This knowledge is used by governments, industry, and non-governmental organizations for multiple purposes, including in developing forest management practices and policies, meet reporting obligations, form negotiating positions, and counter misconceptions of Canada's forest practices.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

15,180,840

21,975,572

6,794,732

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

129

143

14

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Governments, industry, non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders are provided with scientific knowledge on forest ecosystems to support knowledge-based sustainable forest management policies and practices

Representation of the Canadian Forest Service on advisory boards or committees involving governments, industry and non-governmental organizations in order to provide scientific knowledge on forest ecosystems

Representation on advisory boards and committees stays within 10% of baseline of 100 advisory boards and committees

Results: 100

CFS representatives participated on 100 committees and boards during 2015-16.

Scientific knowledge was provided on forest ecosystems to support knowledge-based sustainable forest management policies and practices.

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Groundwater Geoscience

Description

Groundwater provides up to 80% of rural Canada's drinking water and is an essential component of ecosystem health. In the face of growing pressures on water resources, Canada needs a consistent and coordinated approach to groundwater management. NRCan conducts groundwater mapping and assessment activities on key aquifers to better understand the extent of groundwater systems, their dynamics and vulnerability. NRCan also collaborates with its provincial partners to ensure data and approaches in different jurisdictions are harmonized. This information is disseminated through a web portal used by other departments and levels of government, planners and land-use professionals for decision making. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides comprehensive groundwater information and expertise, which contributes to sustainable land-use decision making and groundwater management.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

3,753,180

3,622,557

(130,623)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

28

28

0

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Public and private sectors involved in groundwater management practices incorporate NRCan information into their products

Number of citations from public and/or private sector organizations incorporating NRCan's groundwater maps and assessments into their products (e.g., aquifer maps, plans and reports)

5 annually

Results: 9

Nine citations from public and/or private sector organizations incorporated NRCan's groundwater maps and assessments into their products (including international organizations such as UNESCO, United States Geological Survey and Mauritania government)

Sub-Program 2.3.3: Environmental Studies and Assessments

Description

Government departments, regulatory bodies and industry require science-based information to inform environmental assessment and regulatory decisions, guide the planning of natural resource developments and minimize related environmental impacts. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides scientific and technical information and advice necessary for environmental assessments conducted under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012 and northern legislation, to inform regulatory decisions and to address the environmental risks of major resource projects like the oil sands. It also informs the process of designating new federal parks and protected areas on federal lands.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

5,994,693

6,510,099

515,406

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

44

49

5

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Governments, regulatory bodies, industry and the public access sound environmental geoscience information

Number of citations from public and/or private sector organizations incorporating NRCan's environmental geoscience information into their products

5 per year

Results: 9 citations

Environmental geoscience information generated by NRCan was cited in nine publications representing a wide range of products, such as provincial publications (e.g., 2015 Water Act for Prince Edward Island, Évaluations environnementales stratégiques sur les hydrocarbures (Qc)), mass media (e.g., les Années-lumières at Radio-Canada) or local stakeholders forum (e.g., Forum régional sur l’eau 2015).

Informed environmental assessments

The number of major projects where NRCan scientific and technical experts were engaged over the number of projects where NRCan expertise was requested for environmental assessments, expressed as a percentage (Major projects is defined as those tracked by the MPMO/Northern Projects Management Office)

90%

Results: 99%

36 major projects where NRCan scientific and technical experts were engaged over the number of projects where NRCan expertise was requested for environmental assessments

Sub-Program 2.3.4: Radioactive Waste Management

Description

Requirements to protect the environment or human health when managing radioactive waste were less stringent in the past than they are today. In some cases, historic nuclear or uranium mining activities resulted in a legacy of radioactive waste or contaminated lands that pose risks to the environment and/or the health of Canadians. Through this Sub-program, NRCan develops policy and programs to establish long-term management solutions for radioactive waste in areas where federal intervention is required. Specifically, NRCan is involved in clean-up operations in cases where the wastes were either produced by a Crown corporation, or the original private sector producer no longer exists or cannot be held responsible. NRCan also develops knowledge and innovative technologies in support of responsible radioactive waste management and clean up. This Sub-program includes the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program and the following programs: the Property Value Protection Program, the Municipal Tax Revenue Loss Protection Program, the Historic Waste Program, including the Port Hope Area Initiative and the Gunnar mine site rehabilitation Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

167,079,668

88,563,942

(78,515,726)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

27

16

(11)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

The federal government manages (develops and implements) long-term management solutions to clean up radioactive waste

Percentage implementer compliance with applicable Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission institutional controls and/or licences to carry-out management practices

100%

Results: 100%

 

Ongoing waste inventories and reviews of compliancy with CNSC regulations were successfully delivered to ensure that programs were meeting regulatory requirements. As a result, 100% of the target was met for implementer compliancy with CNSC licensing and controls.

Percentage of decommissioning and radioactive waste management milestones completed under the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program

80%

Results: 100%

 

The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program ended on September 13, 2015 with the completion of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) restructuring process and the full implementation of the new management model for Canadian Nuclear Laboratories. At the program end date, 80% of the decommissioning and radioactive waste management milestones due for completion had been achieved.

Percentage of waste management obligations achieved under the Port Hope Area Initiative Legal Agreement for each project

100%

Results: 100%

 

NRCan’s responsibilities related to the Port Hope Area Initiative ended on September 13, 2015, with the completion of AECL restructuring.

Sub-Program 2.3.5: Earth Observation for Responsible Resource Development

Description

Effective regulatory frameworks depend on environmental monitoring information and tools. Through this Sub-program, NRCan provides Earth observation and geospatial data and tools on oil and gas-concentrated regions in Canada, such as the North and the Alberta oil sands. It informs the identity of baseline conditions for various environmental components (land, water, vegetation) and the cumulative effect of natural resource development, and can guide decision-making on proposed mitigation options. This increases the capacity for regulation that could help prevent and reduce impacts to the environment in these key areas.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,109,600

926,457

(183,143)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

5

8

3

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Target

Actual Results

Governments, regulatory compliance monitoring bodies and industry use Earth observation scientific information (i.e., value-added datasets and publications) to support responsible resource development practices

Number of methods, value-added products and/or demonstration products used by government regulatory bodies and/or industry

5

Results: 5 +

Stakeholders used NRCan’s earth observation information and services to improve environmental performance of energy development, to better understand the impacts of oil sands bitumen extraction, to better identify fire risk and wetland health, to operationalize new satellite-based tools to measure changes in energy infrastructure, and to measure the cumulative impacts of resource development and climate change.

Two new environmental indicators were identified for changes in shrub cover and changes in permafrost-related terrain subsidence. The impact of wildfires and climate change on the arctic permafrost was assessed and new maps were created to better understand risks to northern infrastructure (e.g. roads, pipelines).

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Explosives Safety and Security

Description

Explosives are essential for many economic activities but are inherently dangerous. Strict controls are needed to protect Canadians from incidents that could result in death or serious injury, and economic and environmental harm. Through this Sub-program, NRCan administers and enforces the Explosives Act and associated regulations, which govern the manufacture, importation, transportation, sale, distribution and storage of explosives. This includes fireworks and pyrotechnics, and the sale of materials that can be used to produce explosives. Through this Sub-program, NRCan conducts compliance promotion, outreach, inspections, investigations and enforcement of the Act and regulations. It also tests and develops policies, procedures, guidelines, rules and standards, and supplies expertise to other federal government organizations and law enforcement agencies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

5,101,103

7,233,135

2,132,032

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

62

52

(10)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Regulated establishments' compliance with regulatory requirements is monitored and enforced to protect Canadians from the dangers of explosives

Number of explosives inspections completed

600

Results: 699

NRCan exceeded the target by 99 inspections. The National Inspection Plan, which was introduced to reduce inspector travel time, allowed more time to conduct inspections and continues to increase the efficiency of inspections and supports NRCan in meeting its targets.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Materials and Certification for Safety and Security

Description

Materials are engineered and fabricated for specific applications and environments. Defects in equipment or structures can cause failures that result in death, serious injury, and economic and environmental damage. Non-destructive testing helps to ensure the integrity of safety-critical components in aircraft, boilers and pressure vessels, bridges, buildings, cranes, heavy equipment, nuclear reactors, pipelines and other applications. Several federal regulators and other authorities require non-destructive testing to be performed by inspectors certified according to a national standard. Through this Sub-program, NRCan certifies individuals to this national standard, which is aligned with international standards. NRCan also develops materials solutions to provide increased protection to Canadian Forces personnel and assets, specifically protecting light military vehicles and occupants from the effects of improvised explosive devices, and dismounted soldiers and law enforcement personnel against projectiles and fragmentation devices.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

1,222,498

1,099,518

(122,980)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

15

19

4

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Individuals are certified to perform non-destructive testing to a national standard

Number of valid and active certifications maintained by NRCan (certifications are currently offered in multiple methods and individuals are typically certified in more than one method and/or sector)

12,000

Results: 17,533

Strong market conditions for Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) personnel in Canada contributed to the increased demand for NDT certifications resulting in 17,533 active certifications being maintained by NRCan.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Forest Disturbances Science and Application

Description

Increased scientific knowledge is required in Canada to understand, forecast, mitigate and adapt to natural and human-induced impacts on forest ecosystems. Through this Sub-program, NRCan conducts research and analysis to develop scientific knowledge of forest disturbances (e.g., pests, fire). This scientific knowledge is used by federal, provincial and territorial governments and agencies (both policy makers and regulators) as well as the forest industry to assess risks, forecast impacts and develop mitigation and adaptation strategies related to pests, fire, and climate change. This Sub-program includes the following programs: Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada, and Climate Change Adaptation program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

28,352,881

37,797,563

9,444,682

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

233

251

18

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Governments, agencies and industry are provided with scientific knowledge on forest disturbances to assess risks, and develop mitigation and adaptation strategies

Representation of the Canadian Forest Service on advisory boards or committees involving governments, industry, and non-governmental organizations in order to provide scientific knowledge on forest disturbances

Representation on advisory boards and committees stays within 10% of baseline.

Baseline is 73 advisory boards and committees.

Results: NRCan representatives sat on 133 committees and boards in 2015-16.

Scientific knowledge was provided on forest disturbances to assess risks, and develop mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Climate Change Adaptation

Description

Developing and sharing of information, as well as cooperation among multiple decision makers, are required to successfully plan for and manage the risks and opportunities resulting from a changing climate. Through this Sub-program, NRCan delivers an Adaptation Platform, which brings together national industry and professional organizations, federal, provincial and territorial governments, and other organizations to collaborate on shared adaptation priorities. It also delivers scientific analysis on climate change geoscience issues affecting Canada's North (North of 60 latitude) such as resource development and infrastructure. This facilitates the production and exchange of knowledge and tools that help decision makers understand the implications of a changing climate on their operations, and equips them with the tools and information needed to effectively adapt. This Sub-program includes the Enhancing Competitiveness in a Changing Climate program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

7,820,495

7,641,198

(179,297)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

37

39

2

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Key stakeholders across Canada have access to new knowledge on risks and opportunities resulting from a changing climate for decision-making

Number of new knowledge products released

10 per year

Results: 74 new knowledge products released

74 new knowledge products were released, including: reports, peer reviewed journal papers, open files, maps, informational videos, guidelines, and open science public engagement products.

Sub-Program 3.1.5: Geohazards and Public Safety

Description

To enhance the protection of Canadians from natural hazards, constant monitoring of, and effective planning for, adverse natural events are required. Such events include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, geomagnetic storms, radiological and nuclear incidents, and tsunamis. Through the provision of hazard information and products, NRCan helps other levels of government, including international government bodies, as well as the private sector and professional organizations such as the Canadian Institute of Planners to prepare for and mitigate natural disasters. This work also meets NRCan’s obligation for ongoing nuclear test monitoring under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This Sub-program comprises a research component, which disseminates risk-related information to support the response, recovery and preparedness phases of emergency management.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16 Planned Spending

2015–16 Actual Spending

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

16,175,662

19,938,533

3,762,871

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16 Planned

2015–16 Actual

2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)

109

113

4

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Target

Actual Results

Governments, private sector and regulatory bodies access NRCan's hazard information, products and services

Number of requests for NRCan geohazard information, knowledge products or services by government, private sector, including media, and professional organizations in Canada

50 per year

Results: Over 400 requests

NRCan responded to more than 400 requests from government, private sector, media and professional organizations in Canada for NRCan geohazard information, knowledge products or services.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Essential Geographic Information

Description

Many socio-economic and environmental decisions made by the public, academia and private sector (e.g., emergency preparedness and response, land-use, elections planning, transportation and real estate) rely on up-to-date, comprehensive and accessible landmass information. Through this Sub-program, NRCan ensures open access to Canada’s fundamental geomatics framework and information system, including accurate three-dimensional positioning, high-resolution satellite imagery and other remote sensing products, mapping and other analysis applications that are accurate, authoritative and assured. This essential geographic information enables sound socio-economic and environmental decisions, which support the effective management of Canada’s natural resources and lands.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

29,124,913

29,836,244

711,331

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

273

224

(49)

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Public, private sector and academia access authoritative, reliable and accurate geodetic, geographic and geospatial information for the management of natural resources and lands

Number of times geodetic, geographic and geospatial information (geo-information), tools and services are accessed (e.g., pages viewed, total visits, downloads)

5% annual increase from 2014-15

Combined results : 5.4% increase

Results: 7.0% decrease in user downloads of geographic and geospatial information from 5.6 million (2014) to 5.2 million (2015).

Data is now provided by data collection versus data set, and users employ the "Clip-Zip-Ship" function without accessing entire collections or datasets. With Shared Services Canada, statistics are collected and provided in a new manner.

Results: 12.4% increase in users accessing geodetic information, tools and services

Percentage of NRCan's total dataset repository updated annually

15%

Results: 15%

Updates to NRCan's dataset repository were made to the National Road Network, the National Railway Network, the National Hydrographic Network and the Canadian Geographical Names Data Base. The next generation of CanVec, NRCan’s digital cartographic reference product, was launched.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Canada’s Legal Boundaries

Description

Boundary uncertainty undermines public confidence in the property rights system and is a barrier to exercising property and sovereign rights, as well as responsible social and economic development. For the benefit of all Canadians, NRCan ensures boundary certainty through the proper maintenance of the Canada-US international boundary for law enforcement, land administration, customs and immigration, and transboundary resource management; effective boundary surveys of Indigenous settlement lands to meet Canada's obligations under land claim settlement legislation and treaties; and statutory registration of legal surveys on Canada Lands (the North, Canada's offshore area, Indigenous Lands and National Parks), essential to the creation of legal property boundaries. The boundary certainty provided by NRCan through this Sub-program enables effective management of Canada lands and collaboration across jurisdictions, which advance the interests of Canada's natural resource sectors, both domestically and internationally.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

13,116,615

12,946,744

(169,871)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

104

116

12

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Statutory obligations, including interdepartmental commitments, are achieved in support of boundary certainty for Canada (including the Canada-US boundary) and First Nation Lands

Percentage completion of Canadian obligations for Canada-US boundary maintenance requirements established in the semi-annual Commissioners' Meeting Records of Decision

100%

Results: 90%

International boundary maintenance work (vista clearing, boundary marker upkeep or surveys) was carried out along portions of the Yukon - Alaska, BC - Washington and Quebec - New York/Vermont/Maine boundaries. Specific work along the BC - Washington boundary was not fully completed because it was more significant than expected. The outstanding work is planned for 2016-17.

Percentage of statutory obligations and interdepartmental commitments achieved as defined in the legislation and agreements for Canada and First Nation lands

100%

Results: 98%

Commitments for Canada Lands Surveys related work set out in 40 Interdepartmental Agreements with other government departments were achieved. Results included 4,445 cadastral parcels created in the cadastral database. Completion of an Atlas (compilation of all the field note surveys) related to the Tlicho agreement was delayed until March 2017 to ensure adequate time for consultation with the parties (Tlicho, the Government of Northwest Territories and INAC) regarding the final product.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Polar Continental Shelf Logistics Support

Description

Researchers in Canada's Arctic and Sub-arctic regions need safe, efficient and cost-effective field logistics support because of the remoteness, harsh weather, and high cost of working in those regions. Through its Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP), NRCan coordinates logistics for Canadian government agencies, provincial, territorial and northern organizations, universities and independent groups conducting research, particularly in Canada's North. Through this work, NRCan supports science and government priorities and contributes to the exercise of Canadian Arctic sovereignty. PCSP services include air transportation to and from remote field camps throughout the Canadian Arctic, field equipment and vehicles across Canada, and fuel for aircraft, equipment and camps. They also include meals, accommodations and working space (including a multi-purpose laboratory) at the PCSP facility in Resolute, NU, and a communications network that links the PCSP with science teams in field camps dispersed throughout the Canadian Arctic.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

8,973,148

13,110,027

4,136,879

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

32

32

0

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Canadian Arctic researchers and federal government departments and agencies receive the requested PCSP field logistics support

Percentage of valid requests for logistics support received and supported by PCSP

95%

Results: 99%

In 2015-16, the PCSP provided logistics support to 168 science and operations projects, 8 Canadian Armed Forces Arctic Training Centre projects and 12 Search and Rescue activities. Through its field equipment service, PCSP fulfilled 355 field equipment requests to projects working across the Canadian landmass and provided more than 10,500 person nights of accommodation at its facility in Resolute.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea

Description

Ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea requires Canada to submit the case for extending the outer limits of its offshore beyond 200 nautical miles to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. Through this Sub-program, NRCan conducts seabed and seismic surveys to compile accurate coordinates on the limits of the continental shelf area, as well as to support Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada with the presentation, interpretation and defence of the scientific evidence included in the formal submission. If successful in defending the case, Canada will secure international recognition for this precisely determined extended area over which it may exercise sovereign rights over the natural resources of the seabed and subsoil.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2015–16
Planned Spending

2015–16
Actual Spending

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

19,940,467

18,217,655

(1,722,812)

Human Resources (FTEs)

2015–16
Planned

2015–16
Actual

2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)

11

11

0

Performance Results

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Global Affairs Canada (GAC) presents a comprehensive, scientifically sound report for Canada's claim to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles

Percentage of necessary scientific and technical data and analysis delivered to GAC for the presentation of Canada's claim to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles

100%

Results: On track to achieve 100%

In 2015-16, a 42-day scientific survey was conducted in the eastern Arctic Ocean to acquire geological and geophysical data of the seafloor and subsoil. To date, approximately 15,000 km of geophysical data has been collected in the Arctic Ocean. A final survey will take place in summer 2016. Canada expects to file a full submission for the Arctic Ocean in late 2018, early 2019.

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