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Clean Energy

1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Program Activity 2.1 – Clean Energy   /  Sub Activity 2.1.3 – Clean Energy Science and Technology

3a)  Program Description

The ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (ecoEII) received funding in Budget 2011, the Next Phase of Canada’s Economic Action Plan, for a comprehensive suite of research and development (R&D) and demonstration projects. The program’s objective is to support energy technology innovation to produce and use energy in a cleaner and more efficient way. This Initiative is a key component of the Government of Canada’s actions to achieve real emissions reductions, while maintaining Canada’s economic advantage and its ability to create jobs for Canadians. The ecoEII will also help in the search for long-term solutions to reducing and eliminating air pollutants from energy production and use.

Activities funded under ecoEII are in five strategic priority areas:

  • Energy Efficiency
  • Clean Electricity and Renewables
  • Bioenergy
  • Electrification of Transportation
  • Unconventional Oil and Gas

The Initiative consists of two separate funding streams: one for R&D projects, and one for demonstration projects (Clean Electricity and Renewables only).

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected achievements for 2011-12:

  1. Establish and launch program with calls for proposals;
  2. Establish rigorous proposal review process;
  3. Complete project selection (both R&D and Demo components, including Quick start R&D)

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Achievements for 2011-2012:

The following achievements support key outcomes for Canada’s approach to clean energy technology, including academia, industry and public sector collaborations for the advancement of clean energy technologies and increased availability of scientific and technical knowledge to advance the development of technology.

1. Program established and launched with calls for proposals;
In 2011-12, NRCan led a competitive interdepartmental and external request for project proposals for funding from the ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (ecoEII), building on the past success of processes used for the ecoENERGY Technology Initiative and the Clean Energy Fund.

2. Establish rigorous proposal review process;
NRCan was responsible for defining the scope of Letters of Interest and Requests for Project Proposals (RFPs), following the initial engagement with key leaders, for issuing and communicating RFPs, for defining project evaluation criteria and establishing expert review committees, and for managing the evaluation process. NRCan provided secretariat support to the interdepartmental technical, DG and ADM project selection committees. The ecoEII Program put in place service standards during the RFP solicitation and the forthcoming project delivery stages.

3. Completed project selection (both R&D and Demo components);
Overall 1,114 letters of interest were received and processed in a timely fashion. This resulted in 111 projects from 159 proposals being selected for R&D by Federal departments in the first year of ecoEII. For the subsequent years of the program, 139 projects were selected from 460 proposals for federal R&D (including quick start R&D), external R&D and demonstration projects. These will proceed to the due diligence phase.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

A number of minor process improvements were noted, but overall the launch, which was planned and executed based on experience gained with previous, similar programs, was very successful - the response was at an unprecedented level, with 1,114 proposals received and the Initiative being over 12 times oversubscribed financially. The feedback on rejected proposals was appreciated by those proponents who took advantage of it.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA: $279.51
Program's planned spending in 2011-2012:  $24.23
Program's actual spending in 2011-2012:   $19.07


1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY Efficiency

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Sub Activity 2.1.4 - Energy Efficiency and Alternative Transportation Fuels

Sub-Sub Activities:
2.1.4.1 – Equipment
2.1.4.2 – Housing
2.1.4.3 – Buildings
2.1.4.4 – Industry
2.1.4.5 – Transportation

3a)  Program Description

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program is investing $195 million between 2011 and 2016 to maintain the Government of Canada’s momentum to improve energy efficiency in Canada - at home, at work and on the road. These efforts will make the housing, building, and equipment stock more energy efficient, energy performance more visible, and industry and vehicle operations more efficient. Improving energy efficiency will contribute to a cleaner environment, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while saving Canadians money and making the most of our natural resources.

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program features the following components:

ecoENERGY Efficiency for Buildings supports the development and implementation of energy codes, benchmarking tools, training and information materials to improve the energy efficiency of commercial and institutional buildings in Canada.

ecoENERGY Efficiency for Housing encourages the construction and retrofit of low-rise residential housing, making the stock more energy efficient.

ecoENERGY Efficiency for Equipment Standards and Labelling introduces or raises energy efficiency standards for a wide range of products, and promotes energy efficient products through the ENERGY STAR program.

ecoENERGY Efficiency for Industry aids the implementation of an Energy Management Standard in industrial facilities, and accelerates energy-saving investments and the exchange of best-practices information within Canada’s industrial sector.

ecoENERGY Efficiency for Vehicles provides both individual Canadians and Canada’s commercial/institutional fleet sector with decision-making tools for buying and operating their vehicles to reduce fuel consumption. It also promotes vehicle efficiency by introducing improved vehicle fuel consumption labels and a light-duty tire information system.

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected Achievements – 2011/12

4.9 – 5.8 petajoules of energy is saved through ecoENERGY Efficiency in 2011/12.

Training sessions on energy efficiency products and practices for 169 000 individuals in the transportation sector, 400 in the buildings sector, 500 in the housing sector, and 750 (including conferences and webinars) in the industrial sector, for a total of 170 650 individuals trained.

National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 published by March 31, 2012.

Expected Achievement - Key to program delivery

Increased energy efficiency resulting in energy savings of 36 - 44 petajoules by March 31, 2016.

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

The renewed ecoENERGY Efficiency program achieved energy savings of over 5 petajoules in 2011/12.

  •  This achievement contributes to the following Clean Energy outcome:
        Reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector.
  •  Methods for measuring results: The energy savings resulting from the program’s activities are tracked.

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program exceeded its targets for the number of individuals trained on energy efficiency products and practices. In total, over 218 300 individuals were trained.  By sector: transportation sector over 210 000 new drivers and 4300 fleet drivers; buildings sector over 1250 individuals; housing sector over 800 builders, energy professionals, and tradespersons; industrial sector over 1950 individuals were trained. 

  •  This achievement contributes to the following Clean Energy outcome: An increase
       in clean energy scientific and technical knowledge and stakeholder awareness of related clean energy production, energy efficient and alternative energy technologies, resources, products, services, and practices.
  •  Methods for measuring results: The number of training participants is tracked by each sector’s training initiatives.

The National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 was published in November 2011, thereby meeting the target. The National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 is available for adoption or adaptation by provinces and territories for implementation in their jurisdiction.

  • This achievement contributes to the following Clean Energy outcome:
      Stakeholders have increased capacity to adopt cleaner energy production and energy efficiency and alternative energy technologies, products, services, and practices.
  •  Methods for tracking results: The National Energy Code for Buildings 2011 is available from the National Research Council.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

The ecoENERGY Efficiency program was launched in September 2011. This provided a significant challenge to achieving the overall and sector specific targets. Effective program delivery ensured that this risk was mitigated, and the program’s targets were achieved in 8 months.  Launching any future programs earlier in the fiscal year than the September date of ecoENERGY Efficiency would make it easier for the program to achieve its objectives.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA (2011-2016): $190.11

Program's planned spending in 2011-2012: $38.04

Program's actual spending in 2011-2012:  $34.44


1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Sub Activity 2.1.4 - Energy Efficiency and Alternative Transportation Fuels

Sub-Sub Activity 2.1.4.2 – Housing

3a)  Program Description

Initiated on April 1, 2007, the four-year, $745-million ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes program provided federal grants to property owners for improving the energy efficiency of their homes and reducing their homes' impacts on the environment. Budget 2011 allocated an additional one-year investment of $400 million to the program.

ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes used the EnerGuide Rating System to help homeowners make smart energy retrofit decisions for their home. With this system, a certified energy advisor performs a professional evaluation of the energy efficiency characteristics of the house, including a diagnostic test to determine air leakage. The energy advisor prepares a detailed personalized checklist of recommended upgrades for the property owner, including the EnerGuide pre-retrofit energy rating of the house. The checklist shows the recommended, most effective upgrades. The property owner then chooses which upgrades to have done.

Under ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes, after the retrofit work was completed, the advisor performed a post-retrofit energy evaluation and assigned a new energy-rating label, and the property owner was then entitled to a grant.

Along with ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes, 12 of 13 provinces and territories offered complementary incentive programs. Five of these continue to offer incentive programs, making ongoing use of NRCan’s EnerGuide Rating System and its national infrastructure (file processing, quality assurance, technical support, software, etc.), as do emerging programs from utilities and municipalities

3b) Expected Achievements

Up to between 250,000 and 280,000 incentive grants paid directly to property owners who implement home energy retrofits.

Up to 11 petajoules of energy is saved through ecoENERGY Retrofit - Homes.

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

The 2011/12 renewal of the ecoENERGY Retrofit – Homes program reached its target of 250,000 registrants, and provided incentives to eligible homeowners to make their homes more energy efficient and reduce their energy related expenses.

  • This achievement contributes to the following outcome: Energy producers and users adopt clean energy and energy efficiency technologies, products, services, and practices.
  • Method for measuring results:  Participants are tracked as homeowners registered directly with the program by using an online web form or by phoning Service Canada.

The renewed program achieved energy savings of over 4 petajoules per year.

  • This achievement contributes to the following outcome: Reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector
  • Method for measuring results: Program participants were required to have both a pre- and post-retrofit evaluation. Using the data collected during these on-site evaluations, the program could calculate energy savings.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

Allowing registration with no financial commitment permitted households to sign up for the program even if they had little intent to proceed. Any future program should require investment as part of registration or participation.

The program renewal allowed a maximum of nine months in total for households to have energy evaluations and do their retrofit work whereas nine months was the average time required to do the work during the 2007/11 program phase. For any future program, providing more time would result in fewer households trying to complete all stages over a short period.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA (2011-2016): $400.00

Program's planned spending in 2011-2012: $400.00

Program's actual spending in 2011-2012:  $211.43


1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Sub Activity 2.1.4 - Energy Efficiency and Alternative Transportation Fuels

Sub-Sub Activity 2.1.4.6 – Alternative Transportation Fuels

3a)  Program Description

The ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels Program funds education and outreach efforts as well as codes and standards work for natural gas vehicles. Building on recommendations included in The Natural Gas Use in the Canadian Transportation Sector Deployment Roadmap, ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels is facilitating the creation of an alternative transportation fuels website as well as two local support networks that will deliver education and outreach materials to fleets and other key stakeholders. This program is also facilitating updates to codes and standards that are needed for compressed natural gas vehicles. In the case of liquefied natural gas vehicles, entirely new standards will be established.

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected Achievements - 2011/12

Establish and support two codes and standards committees actively working on developing and updating codes and standards related to alternative fuels. 

Expected Achievements - Key to program delivery

Establishing a committee dedicated to the development of a Canadian Code for liquefied
natural gas fuelling stations.

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Two non-active codes and standards committees were revitalised and one new committee was created and are actively working on developing and updating the codes and standards for liquid and compressed natural gas vehicles and refueling stations. The codes and standards being developed under the guidance of these technical committees will be harmonized with those already developed in other key jurisdictions, such as the United States, to the extent possible.

  •  This achievement contributes to the following outcome: An increase in clean energy scientific and technical knowledge and stakeholder awareness of related clean energy   production, energy efficient and alternative energy technologies, resources, products, services, and practices
  • Methods for measuring results: Supported by the Natural Gas Technical Advisory Group (TAG), the two key committees leverage the experience found in government and in the private sector to look at the number of existing codes
    and standards and draft new ones.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

Formalizing the relationship between OEE as the program manager and CanmetENERGY as the technical lead through a Memorandum of Understanding has enabled a very effective use of the department’s resources and expertise. By establishing regular progress meetings between the various NRCan teams, the program management team was kept well aware of progress while each of the partnering groups was able to manage their own resource needs to meet objectives.

By establishing the Natural Gas Technical Advisory Group (TAG), whose role is to provide oversight and guidance and create a process of project champions tasked with defining issues and proposing solution mechanisms, the engagement of stakeholders was maintained and the proper skill sets were applied to each specific issue.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA (2011-2016): $2.87

Program's planned spending in 2011-2012: $0.77

Program's actual spending in 2011-2012:  $0.48


1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy Theme

1b) Program Name

Marine Renewable Energy Enabling Measures

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

The objective is linked to NRCan’s Strategic Outcome 2: Environmental Responsibility – “Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.”  The MREEM program falls under Program Activity Architecture Sub-Activity 2.1.2: Renewable Energy Deployment.

3a)  Program Description

The MREEM program will examine legislation and regulations and develop a policy framework for administering marine renewable energy development (offshore wind, wave, tidal) in the federal offshore. The program will address critical knowledge gaps by determining the requirements for and stakeholder's views of a federal policy framework for administering marine renewable energy in the federal offshore.  Following the advancement of knowledge on administering marine renewable energy, program officials will prepare a policy framework for administering marine renewable energy in the federal offshore.

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected Achievements – 2011/12

In 2011-2012, expected achievements for this program included:

  • Identify and assess federal policy instruments relevant to the administration of marine renewable energy development in the federal offshore;
  • Consult with stakeholders
  • Examine international marine renewable energy management regimes

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

In fiscal year 2011-12, once the program was established and staffed, research and analysis was conducted on the current situation in Canada regarding the regulation of marine renewable energy, at the federal level and at the provincial level. In particular, information on the various regulatory requirements that may be applicable for marine renewable energy installations was assembled and analyzed.

Preliminary consultations with other federal departments, including the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Transport Canada and the National Energy Board, were held in order to hear their perspectives relating to the regulation of marine renewable energy, and to inform and engage these departments on the activities planned under this program. Provincial governments were also consulted informally, with a primary goal of informing them of the program and its objectives and activities.

Extensive discussions were held with legal services to better understand and scope the legal issues surrounding marine renewable energy regulation, and a series of legal opinions were sought to explore the suite of options for the federal oversight, governance and regulation of marine renewable energy projects.

In addition, a literature review examining marine regulatory regimes in eight different countries was conducted. This review will assist in ensuring that program officials learn from the past experiences of these countries’ forays into the regulation of marine activities.

It is foreseen that these achievements will contribute to increasing the knowledge of policy framework options by NRCan, the industry and other stakeholders.1

5.  Program Lessons Learned

N/A

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding approved under the CAA (2011-2016): $3.83

Planned spending in 2011-2012: $0.57

Actual spending in 2011-12: $0.42


1 This sentence refers to an immediate outcome at the program level, which is aligned with the Clean Energy Theme Logic Model.

1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY for Renewable Power

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Sub Activity 2.1.2 - Renewable Energy Deployment

3a)  Program Description

The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program was introduced on 1st April, 2007 to increase Canada's supply of electricity from renewable sources. The program provides an incentive of 1 cent per kilowatt-hour (kWh) over ten years to new projects generating electricity from renewable sources, such as wind, biomass, and low-impact hydro and solar photovoltaic. The project’s authority to sign contribution agreements ended on 31st March, 2011. The program will continue to provide incentives up until March 31st, 2021.

3b) Expected Achievements

The program’s expected outcomes included annual production of 14.3 terawatt-hours of electricity or about 4000 MW of capacity depending on the mix of energy sources and greenhouse emission (GHG) reductions in the range of 6.0 to 6.7 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (Mt CO2) per year.

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

By March 31st, 2012, 104 contribution agreements had been signed representing 4,458 MW of renewable power capacity and commitments of $1.39 billion over 14 years resulting in approximately 6.0 Mt CO2 emission reductions per year. 

These achievements contribute to the Theme outcome of increased adoption of renewable energy, which results in reduced GHG emissions2.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Program has demonstrated federal leadership and has helped launch the renewable power industry, particularly wind power.
  • The regular follow-up with project proponents regarding the status of their projects enhanced the program’s ability to predict program’s annual achievements and allowed the program to manage its long-term funding profile.    

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding approved under the CAA (2007-2021): $1,454.72

Planned spending in 2011-2012: $139.51

Actual spending in 2011-12: $127.05


2 Based on the 2007-2011 Clean Energy Theme Logic Model.

1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

ecoENERGY Technology Initiative

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Program Activity 2.1 – Clean Energy   / Sub Activity 2.1.3 – Clean Energy Science and Technology

3a)  Program Description

The ecoETI is a component of ecoACTION, the Government of Canada’s actions toward clean air and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions. It is a $230-million investment in clean energy S&T. The funding helps in the search for long-term solutions to reducing and eliminating air pollutants from energy production and use. Part of the funding has been allocated to the demonstration of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Ten projects have been selected in this area.

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected achievements for 2011-12:

  1. Making significant progress in advancing eight carbon capture & storage (CCS) demonstration projects, which are expected to be completed on March 31 2012.
  2. Knowledge dissemination of science and technology using different tools (e.g. publications, reports, workshops).

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

Achievements for 2011-12:

  1. Made significant progress in advancing ten carbon capture & storage (CCS) pilot-scale and small demonstration projects. These projects are expected to be completed in the 2012-13 fiscal year. Some highlights include:
    1. Signature of a new contribution agreement with SaskPower for the Carbon Capture Test Facility. The SaskPower Carbon Capture Test Facility commenced detailed engineering and concluded a $60M partnership agreement with Hitachi, the first of three expected strategic partners.
    2. Signature of a new $9 million contribution agreement with the Petroleum Technology Research Centre to demonstrate that captured CO2 can be safely stored in deep saline formations in south eastern Saskatchewan.
    3. Signature of an amendment to the contribution agreements with Enhance. Enhance Energy Inc. has completed Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) studies and is moving ahead to implement the $1.2B Alberta Carbon Trunk Line (ACTL) project to enable the transportation of CO2 gathered in the Alberta Industrial Heartland to oil reservoirs in central Alberta.
    4. Signature of an amendment to the contribution agreements with TransAlta. Transalta Corporation has completed FEED studies for the project Pioneer, a proposed integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in the area of coal fired electricity. This project has informed the development of Environment Canada’s GHG regulations for the coal fired electricity sector. The FEED studies were used as a basis for a major decision not to proceed with the project in April 2012. Nevertheless, the FEED studies will add to the emerging knowledge base for CCS application for the coal fired electricity sector.
    5. The CCS project with Husky Oil Operations Ltd has started operation at the Lloydminster, Saskatchewan upgrading facility and has started capturing CO2 at the rate of 100,000 tonnes of CO2 /yr. The CO2 will be sequestered in depleted oil wells located in Lashburn and Tangleflags, SK.
    6. The $41M IEA GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project, funded by the program, will be completed by December 2012.  The key deliverable will be a Best Practices Manual, scheduled for publication in September 2012.  More results will be disseminated through various publications and conference presentations.
  2. Knowledge dissemination was achieved via publications and workshops including:
    1. The completion of the “North American Carbon Storage Atlas”, which identifies in Canada, Mexico and the United States all major emission sources of CO2 and potential geological reservoirs where these CO2 emissions can be stored, including estimates of the storage capacity of these reservoirs, was completed in 2011-12 and unveiled on May 1, 2012 at the 11th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture Utilization & Sequestration Conference in Pittsburgh, PA.\
    2. The final report for the FEED study demonstration project by Capital Power was released publicly in September 2011. http://www.capitalpower.com/MediaRoom/news/Pages/igccreport.aspx

These achievements support key outcomes for Canada’s approach to clean energy technology, including: 3

  • transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies and practices leading to lower emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air contaminants (CACs); and
  • awareness and understanding among stakeholders of the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs and CACs.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

Many lessons learned in the management of the ecoETI program are being implemented in the management of the Clean Energy Fund & ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative (improved calls for proposals, better communication with proponents, more structured due diligence and audit processes, information management system, implementation of clear service standards), also managed by the Office of Energy Research and Development.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA: $217.33 (2007-2012 – program approved for one extra year)

Program's planned spending in 2011-2012:  $48.71

Program's actual spending in 2011-2012:  $43.24


3 Based on the 2007-2011 Clean Energy Theme Logic Model.

1a) CAA Theme

Clean Energy

1b) Program Name

Clean Energy Policy

2.  Linkage to the 2011/12 departmental Program Activity Architecture

Sub activity 1.1.7 -  Domestic and International Energy Policy

3a)  Program Description

The Clean Energy Policy program supports Canada’s climate change mitigation and other environmental objectives by preparing policy analysis, recommendations, and coordination on clean energy, domestic climate change mitigation, clean energy technology, and unconventional energy. Throughout the second phase of the Clean Air Agenda (2011-2016), the program will seek to achieve an improved decision-making and understanding of the implications of changes to Canada’s energy mix, the opportunities for efficiency and technology innovation gains impacts on energy productivity, and the overall environmental footprint of energy. It is also expected that the analysis and advice provided by the program on new and existing reduction measures will contribute to the development of policy options, which are more effective and cost efficient.

3b) Expected Achievements

Expected achievements for 2011-2012 included:

  • Provision of advice and information products (such as briefing material and research and analysis) to senior management clean energy policy and environment issues in support of policy and program development and decision making;
  • Continued collaboration with Environment Canada on approach on a regulatory framework for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions;
  • Coordination of planning and reporting for Clean Energy Theme programs;
  • Provision of technical expertise and policy advice on domestic carbon capture and storage (CCS) policy activities; and
  • Provision of fact-based information regarding unconventional energy sources, such as the oil sands and shale gas, to Canadians, key stakeholders and foreign governments.

4.  Program Achievements / Performance Summary

The expected achievements for 2011-2012 for the Clean Energy Policy program were realised.

  • The program provided timely and strategic advice on clean energy to senior management, as well as to other governmental departments and external policy fora. In consultation with NRCan and federal colleagues, substantive advice was prepared on topics, such as energy-related GHG emissions, clean energy technology, the US approach to regulating GHG emissions, Canada's approach to and provincial/territorial action on GHG regulation, domestic air quality regulation and the Species at Risk Act. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was also undertaken to investigate the impacts of clean energy policy and market forces on the energy sector.
  • Collaboration with Environment Canada (EC) on the approach to a regulatory framework for GHG emissions continued in 2011-2012. For example, NRCan collaborated with EC on the proposed performance standard for coal-fired electricity generation regulations by providing advice on technical issues such as CCS and the potential impacts on electricity prices.
  • The program coordinated the development, NRCan approval and submission to EC of the Clean Energy Theme 2010-11 Horizontal Performance Report and the 2012-13 Horizontal Report on Plans and Priorities.
  • In 2011-12, the program formulated significant policy analysis and advice for senior management and the Minister on CCS trends, opportunities, costs benefits, and challenges in Canada. Also, NRCan led the Government of Canada's engagement in a comprehensive, multi-stakeholder Regulatory Framework Assessment (RFA) for CCS in Alberta, being undertaken by Alberta's Department of Energy. Several key issues were addressed and some draft recommendations were formulated in 2011-12. The Steering Committee for the RFA expects to complete its report by the end of 2012.
  • Fact-based information and analysis of the oil sands was provided. This information was deployed through, for example, fact sheets, assessments and website content for the use of government stakeholders, NGOs, and the general public both domestic and internationally. Numerous studies released by foreign governments, NGOs and other organizations were assessed for accuracy and correction, where required. Significant effort was directed in 2011-12 to providing factual information on the oil sands to the European Commission and European Union members for the development of the European Union's Fuel Quality Directive and to the California Air Resources Board for the development of the California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. This work will continue in 2012-13.

These achievements contribute to an increase in clean energy scientific and technological knowledge and stakeholder awareness of related clean energy production, energy efficient and alternative energy technologies, resources, products, services and practices. While this program does not by itself contribute to emission reductions, it will improve the overall effectiveness of Canada’s clean energy actions in response to climate change, clean air and other environmental challenges.

5.  Program Lessons Learned

In order to be able to respond to time sensitive requests on clean energy, climate change and environment issues, NRCan increased its clean energy policy capacity in 2011-2012 through proactive recruitment of analysts in this field.

NRCan also worked collaboratively with EC and other key partners to maintain communication and capitalize on respective areas of expertise.

To better support the Government of Canada’s regulatory development process to address climate change, NRCan moved to harmonize elements of departmental modelling activities with EC and the National Energy Board. NRCan adopted the Energy 2020 model used by these other organizations to forecast future energy and associated GHG emissions.

6.  Financial Information (excluding PWGSC accommodation costs) ($ million)

Total funding for the program approved under the CAA (2011-2016): $11.64

Program's planned spending in 2011-2012: $2.33

Program's actual spending in 2011-2012: $1.54

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