Language selection

Search

Natural Resources Canada Quarterly Financial Report (Unaudited) for the Quarter Ended June 30, 2016

Statement outlining results, risks and significant changes in operations, personnel and programs

1. Introduction

This quarterly financial report should be read in conjunction with the Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A), as well as Canada’s Budget 2016. It has been prepared by management as required by section 65.1 of the Financial Administration Act and in the form and manner prescribed by Treasury Board. This quarterly financial report has not been subject to an external audit or review.

1.1 Authority, Mandate and Programs

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) seeks to enhance the responsible development and use of Canada’s natural resources and the competitiveness of Canada’s natural resource sectors. The department is an established leader in science and technology in the fields of energy, forests, and minerals and metals, and applies its expertise in earth sciences to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of Canada’s landmass. NRCan develops policies and programs that enhance the contribution of the natural resource sectors to the economy and improve the quality of life of Canadians.Footnote 1

Further details on NRCan’s authority, mandate and programs can be found in Part II of the Main Estimates.

1.2 Basis of Presentation

This quarterly financial report has been prepared by management using an expenditure basis of accounting. The accompanying Statement of Authorities includes NRCan’s spending authorities granted by Parliament, and those used by NRCan are consistent with the Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A) for the 2016-17 fiscal year. This quarterly report has been prepared using a special purpose financial reporting framework.

The authority of Parliament is required before monies can be spent by the Government. Approvals are given in the form of annually approved limits through appropriation acts or through legislation in the form of statutory spending authority for specific purposes.

As part of the Parliamentary business of supply, the Main Estimates must be tabled in Parliament on or before March 1 preceding the new fiscal year. As the Federal Budget is typically tabled around the same time as Main Estimates, measures announced in the Budget are not included in Main Estimates for either 2015-16 or 2016-17.

In fiscal year 2016-17, frozen allotments will be established by Treasury Board authority in departmental votes to prohibit the spending of funds identified as savings measures in Budget 2016. The changes to departmental authorities for future years will be implemented through the Annual Reference Level Update, as approved by Treasury Board, and reflected in the subsequent Main Estimates tabled in Parliament. The same approach was taken in 2015-16 for savings measures in Budget 2015.

NRCan uses the full accrual method of accounting to prepare and present its annual unaudited departmental financial statements, which are part of the Departmental Performance Report. However, the expenditure authorities voted by Parliament remain on an expenditure basis.

2. Highlights of Fiscal Quarter and Fiscal Year-to-Date Results

This Departmental Quarterly Financial Report reflects the results as at June 30, 2016, including Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A) for which full supply was released. The details presented in this report focus on and compare the first quarter results of 2016-17 with those of 2015-16.

Authorities

As per Table 1, presented at the end of this document, and on Graph 1 below, as at June 30, 2016, NRCan has authorities available for use of $1,686.4 million in 2016-17 compared to $2,492.3 million as of June 30, 2015, for a net decrease of $805.9 million or 32.3%.

Graph 1

Text version
Graph 1 Variances in Authorities as at June 30, 2016
(in millions of dollars) Fiscal year 2015-16
total available for use for the year ending
31-Mar-16
Fiscal year 2016-17
total available for use for the year ending
31-Mar-17
Vote 1 - Operating 893 517
Vote 5 - Capital 54 83
Vote 10 - Grants and contributions 307 284
Statutory  1,239 803
Total budgetary authorities 2,492 1,686

The decrease of $805.9 million in authorities in 2016-17 compared to 2015-16 is explained by the net effect of both increases and decreases within Vote 1 operating expenditures, Vote 5 capital expenditures, Vote 10 grants and contributions, and statutory authorities, as per the following:

For Vote 1 operating expenditures, a net decrease of $375.3 million between the authorities available for use at the end of the first quarters of 2016-17 ($517.4 million) and 2015-16 ($892.7 million) is explained mainly by the following year-over-year changes:

Decreases:

  • $395.2 million for the transfer of responsibility for the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program and Port Hope Area Initiative to Atomic Energy Canada Limited.

Increases:

  • $7.0 million for the transfers between Operating and Capital, as part of an alignment exercise; and
  • $5.0 million for the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) - Mapping of the North Pole, due to a planned adjustment to the program financial profile.

For Vote 5 capital expenditures, a net increase of $28.3 million between the authorities available for use at the end of the first quarters of 2016-17 ($82.6 million) and 2015-16 ($54.3 million) is explained mainly by the following year-over-year changes:

Increases:

  • $29.2 million for the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, as this program received additional funds via Budget 2016; and
  • $6.1 million for the Enhancing National Earthquake Monitoring initiative, due to a planned adjustment to the program financial profile.

Decreases:

  • $7.0 million for the transfers between Operating and Capital, as part of an alignment exercise.

For Vote 10 grants and contributions, a net decrease of $22.9 million between the authorities available for use at the end of the first quarters of 2016-17 ($283.7 million) and 2015-16 ($306.6 million) is explained mainly by the following year-over-year changes:

Decreases:

  • $25.7 million for the Climate Change Renewal, as the envelope - announced in Budget 2016 was at a lower level than that of 2015-16;
  • $22.0 million for ecoENERGY for Biofuels, due to a planned adjustment to the program financial profile; and
  • $13.6 million for the Wind Power Production Incentive Program, due to a planned adjustment in the program financial profile.

Increases:

  • $13.8 million for the Investments in Forest Industry Transformation Program, due to a planned adjustment to the program financial profile;
  • $11.3 million for the Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) Sustainable Development Technology Fund, due to a planned adjustment to the program financial profile, offset by a decrease for the transfer of responsibility for SDTC to the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development via the 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates (A); and
  • $12.9 million for the Green Infrastructure, a group of new initiatives announced in Budget 2016.

For statutory items, a net decrease of $435.9 million between the first quarters of 2016-17 ($802.8 million) and 2015-16 ($1,238.7 million) is explained mainly by:

Decreases:

  • $368.1 million in the Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Resource Revenue Fund, as forecasts at the time of Main Estimates were that less revenue would be collected in 2016-17 than in 2015-16, due to lower oil pricesFootnote 2;
  • $59.9 million in the Nova Scotia Offshore Revenue Account, as forecasts at the time of Main Estimates were that less revenue would be collected in 2016-17 than in 2015-16 due to decreased production and lower natural gas pricesFootnote 3; and
  • $10.6 million pertaining to the Crown Share Adjustment Payments for Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources, due to a planned adjustment to the financial profile.

Increases:

  • $2.7 million in Employee Benefit Plan adjustment, as the rate increased in 2016-17 compared to 2015-16.

In addition to the above detail, other minor increases and decreases occurred within the appropriated funding and in other statutory departmental programs.

Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object

The spending for the quarter ending June 30, 2016 amounts to $195.4 million or 11.6% of total funding available for the fiscal year, compared to $209.2 million or 8.4% for the same quarter last year. This decrease is mainly related to a decrease in expenditures for professional and special services in 2016-17 compared to the same type of expenditures in 2015-16. Further analysis has been done on standard objects with significant expenses, which is represented on Graph 2 below, and Table 2 at the end of this document presents the spending for all standard objects.

Graph 2

Text version
Graph 2 Variance in Expenditures for Significant Standard Objects at at June 30, 2016
(in thousands of dollars) Fiscal year 2015-2016
Expended during the quarter ended
30-Jun-15
Fiscal year 2016-2017
Expended during the quarter ended
30-Jun-16
Personnel 104,936 102,120
Professional and special services 32,002 18,665
Transfer payments 63,674 65,837
All Other Standard Objects 8,585 8,811
Total net budgetary expenditures 209,197 195,433

The net decrease of $2.8 million in personnel expenditures between the first quarters of 2016-17 ($102.1 million) and 2015-16 ($104.9 million) is largely due to reduced salary expenditures due to the completion of the ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative in 2015-16. 

The net decrease of $13.3 million in expenditures for professional and special services between the first quarters of 2016-17 ($18.7 million) and 2015-16 ($32 million) is mainly explained by the following:

Decreases:

  • $16.0 million for the transfer of responsibility for the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program and Port Hope Area Initiative to Atomic Energy Canada Limited; and  
  • $1.5 million due to the completion of the ecoENERGY Innovation Initiative in 2015-16. 

Increases:

  • $4.7 million due to the timing of expenditures to other government departments from one year to the next related to realty management services; and
  • $2.3 million for payments to the department of Justice Canada in accordance with the new funding model; wherein 50% of NRCan's estimated annual legal service costs are advanced to the department of Justice Canada in the first quarter in 2016-17, as opposed to receiving and paying monthly invoices in 2015-16.

The net increase of $2.1 million in expenditures for transfer payments between the first quarters of 2016-17 ($65.8 million) and 2015-16 ($63.7 million) primarily consists of:

Increases:

  • $19.6 million for payments made in the first quarter of 2016-17 to SDTC, however, the program responsibility was subsequently transferred to the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.

Decreases:

  • $15.4 million for statutory Atlantic offshore transfers resulting from the reduction in oil and natural gas prices; and,
  • $1.6 million for the ecoENERGY Biofuels program due to a planned adjustment in the financial profile of the program.

In addition to the above details, other minor increases and decreases were observed within different standards objects.

3. Risks and Uncertainties

NRCan recognizes that a solid understanding of its risk environment is fundamental to achieving its strategic outcomes and maintaining operational efficiency and effectiveness. NRCan sees risk management as an essential element in developing and implementing efficient, effective and relevant policies, programs, science and technology and internal services. NRCan’s approach to risk management is codified in the Integrated Risk Management Policy Framework, which is aligned with the Treasury Board Framework for the Management of Risk.

Natural resources are at the nexus of Canada’s economic and environmental agendas. They bring large economic benefits, accounting for about 20% of Canada’s nominal gross domestic product and 1.8 million jobs. Furthermore, they are a contributing factor in Canada’s environmental performance.

Our collective challenge, which is also an opportunity, is to set and implement a plan that will ensure the growth of the resource sectors and the achievement of our goals in terms of the reduction of our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. At the Paris Climate Change Convention, Canada agreed that by 2030, it will reduce GHG emissions by 30 percent from 2005 levels. This challenge is significant and will be influenced by a variety of factors including market forces.

NRCan is closely monitoring the impacts of these and other developments and taking actions to ensure that our resource sectors remain a source of jobs, prosperity and opportunity in a world that values sustainable practices. In particular, NRCan is supporting the Minister in delivering on his mandate letter commitments. To this end, it has introduced new structures such as a stakeholder engagement unit and a delivery & results unit to help execute the department’s policy agenda.

In addition to being responsive to its external context, NRCan also manages uncertainties regarding its future funding level and spending. The Department continues to manage the costs related to unfunded collective bargaining and salary increases. In response, it tracks its financial risks through scenario planning, monthly analysis of trends and forecasting in both salary and non-salary expenditures, and comprehensive quarterly reviews.

NRCan will continue to integrate risk information into strategic and operational decision making.

4. Significant Changes in Relation to Operations, Personnel, Programs

During the first quarter of 2016-17, Prime Minister Trudeau announced that effective August 1, 2016 Christyne Tremblay would become Deputy Minister for Natural Resources Canada and effective July 11, 2016 Philip Jennings would become Associate Deputy Minister for Natural Resources Canada.

The Appointment of an Acting Chief Financial Officer and Assistant Deputy Minister for the Corporate Management and Services Sector occurred in the first quarter of 2016-17.

No other significant changes in relation to operations, personnel or programs occurred during the first quarter of 2016-17.

Original signed by:

Christyne Tremblay
Deputy Minister

August 29, 2016
Ottawa, Canada

Cheri Crosby, CPA
Acting Chief Financial Officer

August 15, 2016
Ottawa, Canada

Table 1: Statement of Authorities (unaudited)

(in thousands of dollars)
Fiscal year 2016-17 Fiscal year 2015-16
Total available for use for the year ending March 31, 2017* Used during the quarter ended June 30, 2016 Used year-to-date at quarter-end Total available
for use for the year ending March 31, 2016**
Used during
the quarter
ended June 30, 2015
Used year-
to-date at quarter-end
Vote 1 - Net Operating Expenditures 517,355 111,733 111,733 892,703 130,424 130,424
Vote 5 - Capital Expenditures 82,589 4,532 4,532 54,287 995 995
Vote 10 - Grants and Contributions 283,665 39,663 39,663 306,609 24,316 24,316
Statutory Payments
Minister of Natural Resources – Salary
and motor car allowance
84 7 7 82 21 21
Contributions to employee benefit plans 59,384 13,324 13,324 56,645 14,083 14,083
Canada Foundation for Sustainable
Development Technology Grant
- 2,290 2,290 - - -
Contribution to the Canada/
Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board
8,835 - - 8,835 2,209 2,209
Contribution to the Canada/Nova Scotia
Offshore Petroleum Board
4,013 2,178 2,178 3,965 1,003 1,003
Payments to the Nova Scotia Offshore
Revenue Account
14,828 622 622 74,752 1,649 1,649
Payments to the Newfoundland Offshore
Petroleum Resource Revenue Fund
713,253 21,084 21,084 1,081,331 34,497 34,497
Crown Share Adjustment Payments for Nova
Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources
2,408 - - 13,055 - -
Total Statutory Payments 802,805 39,505 39,505 1,238,666 53,462 53,462
Total Budgetary Authorities 1,686,414 195,433 195,433 2,492,265 209,197 209,197

* Total available for use includes only authorities available for use and granted by Parliament at quarter-end through the Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A) which reflects some measures announced in Budget 2016.
** Total available for use includes only authorities available for use and granted by Parliament at quarter-end through the Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates (A) which reflects some measures announced in Budget 2015.

Table 2: Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object (unaudited)
(in thousands of dollars) Fiscal year 2016-17 Fiscal year 2015-16
Planned expenditures for the year ending March 31, 2017* Expended during the quarter ended June 30, 2016 Year-to-date used at Quarter-end Planned expenditures for the year ending March 31, 2016** Expended during the quarter ended June 30, 2015 Year-to-date used at Quarter-end
Budgetary Expenditures:
Personnel 401,370 102,120 102,120 394,827 104,936 104,936
Transportation and communication 13,660 2,427 2,427 15,926 2,686 2,686
Information 9,126 554 554 12,915 494 494
Professional and special services 113,436 18,665 18,665 492,621 32,002 32,002
Rentals 32,969 4,115 4,115 15,276 4,052 4,052
Repair and maintenance 4,059 1,993 1,993 9,832 421 421
Utilities, materials and supplies 33,374 2,460 2,460 33,329 2,106 2,106
Acquisition of land, buildings and works 38,058 - - 7,071 - -
Acquisition of machinery and equipment 46,532 1,131 1,131 51,468 885 885
Transfer payments 1,027,002 65,837 65,837 1,488,547 63,674 63,674
Other subsidies and payments 5,698 412 412 5,532 2,655 2,655
Total Budgetary Expenditures 1,725,284 199,714 199,714 2,527,344 213,911 213,911
Less:
Total Revenues Netted Against Expenditures 38,870 4,281 4,281 35,079 4,714 4,714
Total Net Budgetary Expenditures 1,686,414 195,433 195,433 2,492,265 209,197 209,197

* Planned expenditures reflect some measures announced in Budget 2016.
** Planned expenditures reflect some measures announced in Budget 2015.

Report a problem or mistake on this page
Please select all that apply:

Thank you for your help!

You will not receive a reply. For enquiries, contact us.

Date modified: