Articles

Articles

Feeding the forest… with leftovers

Scientists at Natural Resources Canada are exploring the potential of using wood ash as a forest fertilizer.

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Seeds that Succeed

When a researcher in Northern Ontario was exploring options for trees that might thrive in her community’s changing climate, she zeroed in on the hardy jack pine.

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Wetland fire research improves air quality forecasts and carbon accounting

Wildfires — we usually think of them in terms of forests. But in Canada’s boreal forest, up to one-third of the area burned in wildfires can affect wetlands, which include bogs — also known as muskeg — and swamps.

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Eat, Prey, Love – Stopping the Spruce Budworm

The spruce budworm is the most serious pest affecting forests in eastern North America. Today, an outbreak is under way in Quebec, and budworm populations are on the rise in New Brunswick.

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Climate change: Arctic coastlines eroding up to 40 m yearly

Talk of climate change impact often focuses on the future — 10, 20 or 50 years ahead. But in the Arctic, the erosion of coastline can sometimes be measured from one day to another.

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Footprint meets hoofprint: measuring a mine’s effects on caribou

Both traditional knowledge and scientific studies have observed that barren-ground caribou are very sensitive to changes in their environment.

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Slowing the march of the mountain pine beetle

From biology to modelling and beyond, Natural Resources Canada scientist is helping to build a big-picture understanding of this beetle. Thumbnail attached

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How in the world does Canada get oil from sand?

Get a taste of the Canada Science and Technology museum by taking this little quiz and learning what its oil sands exhibit has to teach us!

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Tsunami layers on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

The Mystery of the Missing Village

John Cassidy explains how Traditional knowledge, science and history align on big west coast earthquakes.

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When the earth whispers …

On the day that Simply Science caught up with seismologist Dr. John Cassidy in Victoria, there was, by coincidence, a small earthquake in that city.

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