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Arctic

Making up for lost time in Canada’s Far North

Government researchers have travelled to Canada’s High Arctic each year since 1959 to measure glacier activity. And since the early 1990s, they’ve also monitored the weather stations that have been installed on the ice. But that all changed in 2020, when travel plans were abruptly cancelled due to COVID-19.

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How do you do research in the Arctic? (To the Point)

Canada’s North, while it’s beautiful, is known for extreme weather and vast areas of rock, ice and snow, covering five million square kilometres including a mind-blowing 36,000 islands. Just getting there can seem daunting! If scientists wanted to conduct scientific research in Canada’s Arctic, how would they get there? They’d call Natural Resources Canada’s Polar Continental Shelf Program, as they provide logistics to support research in the North.

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Hope for Climate Change From Canada's Arctic Ocean

After an impressive career spanning five decades, four countries, three continents, several oceans and countless adventures, you might expect Peta Mudie ready to take a rest. You would be wrong. Now an emeritus scientist at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia — a Government of Canada ocean research facility and the largest ocean research station in Canada — she speaks with a measured urgency: “We’re at a tipping point where we’ve passed the ability to have great certainty in forecasting what’s come for the future.”

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Working the Line: Maintaining the border in Canada’s wilderness (photo gallery)

As a surveyor for the International Boundary Commission, Joe Harrietha “works the line” in locating and maintaining the vast Canada–United States border. The Canadian section of the Commission is part of Natural Resources Canada, and he’s worked in some of the most remote and scenic areas in Canada for more than 25 years. These photos are from some of his expeditions.

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